How Is IoT Driving Growth In Equipment-as-a-Service Options?

Dietmar Bohn

The Internet of Things (IoT) is poised to deliver significant growth to many industries over the next few years. Within three years, it’s expected that companies selling IoT solutions will see revenues of over $450 billion. By 2025, it’s expected that there will be 75.4 billion connected devices worldwide. This provides a strong market for growth in many industries. The manufacturing industry is no different, with opportunities to improve uptime for customers and reduce high-dollar repairs.

At the same time, digitalization and disruption are providing the opportunity for companies with revolutionary new business models to enter the market. One new business model that shows great promise is integrating IoT technology and equipment with aspects of software-as-a-service models. But how will this model work in real life, what impact will it have on the companies that use it, and what benefits will it offer across a wide range of industries? Here’s a quick look.

How is the IoT driving growth in equipment-as-a-service options?

With the advent of cloud computing, software-as-a-service became popular. Essentially, it provided users with software access for a subscription fee, with the software-providing company handling maintenance, upgrades, and security issues. This concept has grown into a wide range of IT and other areas. As an example, from another industry, Netflix provides video services as a service through a monthly subscription fee.

Now the as-a-service model is being applied to a wide range of other industries. Equipment for many industries has often used the service contract or lease model. However, these models have had their own problems. Clients often don’t catch early warning signs that the equipment is having issues. The maintenance schedule may not be appropriate to the client’s site conditions. The equipment may be more than the end user needs. For whatever reason, service contracts can be expensive on both sides.

Equipment-as-a-service that implements IoT technology benefits both sides. Let’s take a look at how it might work in a business. ABC Manufacturing is an electronics manufacturing firm that uses automated MIG welders (metal inert gas welders) to produce part of its electronics components. It has service contracts for these welders, but it is not happy with the downtime and unexpected machine failures, which cost the company money. They’re also not quite sure that the equipment is right for their needs, with the limited-axis welders making somewhat sloppy welds when they reach particular angles.

XYZ  Equipment provides the welding machines but is not happy with the number of failures that could be prevented. These failures cost a lot of time and parts to fix. The unpredictable nature of the failures means sometimes they’re paying repair technicians to sit around while paying overtime when a machine breaks down at odd hours. At the same time, they’re also losing profitability from refunds to ABC Manufacturing for downtime on their lines. They know the customer isn’t quite sure about the machinery, but they’re not quite sure what they want to be changed.

After attending an equipment conference, XYZ’s CTO comes back to the office very excited about new IoT technology and business models. He convinces XYZ’s CEO to try an experiment with ABC’s service contract. XYZ’s CTO sets up an appointment with ABC’s production director and CEO to discuss options.

At the meeting, they talk about the issues with the welders. ABC doesn’t want to invest in any significant money in machinery it isn’t sure will work for their issues, so XYZ offers to set them up with a few 7-axis welders on an equipment-as-a-service option. ABC will pay a monthly fee for the use of the machinery, based on the outcome of the machinery. If they’re not happy with the equipment, ABC can end the subscription at the end of that subscription period without any penalty. XYZ will install sensors that use IoT technology to allow them to remotely monitor the equipment. This allows XYZ to determine when preventative maintenance is needed. The advanced notice lets XYZ schedule maintenance when it makes sense for both companies. XYZ makes fewer repairs and saves money. ABC avoids risk on the equipment. Everyone is happy.

Equipment-as-a-service provides great options for both equipment manufacturers and businesses. By integrating IoT technology with equipment contracts, many companies are gaining better uptime without the heavy investment. Equipment companies are also profiting from the lower failure rate as equipment is being serviced before problems get out of control. IoT technology is expected to add between $10 and $15 trillion to the worldwide GDP by 2030. Where does your company fall with these new possibilities?

Learn how to innovate at scale by incorporating individual innovations back to the core business to drive tangible business value: Accelerating Digital Transformation in Industrial Machinery and Components. Explore how to bring Industry 4.0 insights into your business today: Industry 4.0: What’s Next?


Dietmar Bohn

About Dietmar Bohn

Dietmar Bohn is the Vice President of Industry Cloud at SAP. He brings more than 15 years of CRM experience from both outside and inside SAP and more than 25 years of industry experience. Bohn has held different executive roles spanning CRM strategy projects, CRM implementation projects, CRM development and CRM product management. He holds degrees in Electrical Engineering and in Telecommunications.