Telecommunications Companies: Here's How To Use End-To-End Enterprise Offers To Boost Revenue

Julie Stoughton

Telecommunications companies are not new to the Internet of Things (IoT). Many have long used these tools as a way to gather data and implement change. These organizations, called communication service providers (CSPs), also tend to be willing to adopt technology that enhances operations. Organizations have routinely used IoT to automate processes and ensure networks remain stable. Yet, further investment in this area can also boost revenue. With the IoT market expected to be a $267 billion industry by 2020, according to BCG Perspectives, organizations cannot overlook this opportunity.

End-to-end enterprise adoption could mean new revenue streams

The industry continues to face fierce competition. Finding ways to reduce costs is one thing. Looking for ways to boost revenue streams continues to be critical. However, one of the largest opportunities available to CSPs has yet to be tapped by these organizations.

Within the telecommunications industry, a key area for IoT adoption is in providing platforms for end-to-end enterprise offerings, as well as for connected consumer services. Entry into these markets could provide an incredible new source of revenue. Some experts believe it could represent as much as a quarter of all CSPs’ total revenue within a matter of years.

Another key area for CSPs is in the thriving market of connected homes. Telecommunications organizations will see significant revenue by successfully launching connected home applications for consumers.

Finally, working with commercial entities to create methods for regulatory compliance can also be important. Many entities are struggling in this area due to stringent guidelines. This can be improved with IoT applications through telecommunications companies.

Why telecommunications networks matter

Consider the data from the IoT application. In IoT, there are numerous networks of networks. All are capable of pulling in massive amounts of data that can be used, in a variety of ways, to provide information. However, this type of network requires very specific elements. It must be incredibly reliable, provide ample reach, and have the resilience necessary to manage some of the most challenging circumstances. Other industries, including the semiconductor industry, are finding opportunities to use the tools they have to enhance IoT adoption.

These are the types of services that CSPs can offer beyond what other organizations can. CSPs are now a central point of integration where the digital world connects. Some organizations (generally the largest CSPs in major areas) are already aligning their networks to meet this important, developing need. And, as a result, they are seeing profitable margins.

Where is the endpoint and profit potentials for today’s smaller CSPs? The biggest opportunity lies with enterprise customers. These are end users who are looking for platforms and connectivity that will allow their own transformation into the digital world. CSPs can significantly play a role in this area.

Why CSPs should focus here

The telecommunications industry is still not immune to digital change. In fact, many organizations are struggling financially with the services they offer. High-margin profit centers are being eroded by low-margin network connectivity. Consumers and other end users are finding more affordable ways to get the services they need. New technology, including 5G, is coming as well. That will further increase competition in this sector. As a result, it has become necessary for CSPs to find alternative streams of revenue that can tap into their massive, secure networks to facilitate IoT.

This is also a very significant new opportunity for CSPs. Right now, less than 10% of the overall IoT market comes from connectivity and network managed services, like those CSPs can offer. Implementing these services will enhance profitability. For example, digital applications enabled by IoT, a key service that CSPs can provide, is likely to represent more than 30% of large CSPs’ enterprise-based revenue.

How to take advantage of the opportunities

Putting in place enterprise end-to-end offerings like this can seem overwhelming, but it offers profit potential and fits the framework that CSPs already have. To facilitate this, organizations need to first focus on connectivity. The well-developed networks of CSP management services, as well as their IoT-enabled applications, provide an access point. These organizations already have the ability to scale the number of things connected within any enterprise. They have the tools available to move data across the cloud in a reliable manner. And, they have the means to distribute intelligence to further points.

Creating the digital platform to launch it all

To transform from a typical connectivity service provider into one that meets the newer service demands, a telecom organization needs a versatile IoT platform. The platform must provide the support necessary for large-application development. It must be able to integrate its customers’ backend systems into the new platform. Additionally, it must provide the services that help CSPs manage the cost of their operations as their organization grows.

With 8.4 billion “things” in use and connected in 2017, according to Gartner, it’s time to find a way to tap into this industry. Transforming CSPs’ services through end-to-end offerings can create a new revenue source in one of the fastest growing and in-demand industries today.

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Julie Stoughton

About Julie Stoughton

Julie Stoughton is the Head of Telecommunications Marketing & Communications at SAP. She is a seasoned professional with 16 years of marketing and product marketing experience in software and media technologies. Julie's specialties include strategic market development, positioning and messaging, customer segmentation, product launches, ROI analysis, and go-to-market execution.