How Artificial Intelligence Will Transform Tomorrow’s Digital Supply Chain

Alina Gross

Artificial intelligence (AI) may sound futuristic, but it’s a real-life breakthrough that exists in the present. Anyone who interacts with an online search engine, shops on Amazon, owns a self-parking car, or talks to voice-powered personal assistants like Siri or Alexa is using AI.

AI is a field of computer science in which a machine is equipped with the ability to mimic the cognitive functions of a human. An AI machine can make decisions or predictions based on its past experiences, or it can respond to entirely new scenarios. When given a goal, not only does it attempt to achieve its objective, it continuously tries to improve upon its past performance.

Revolutionizing the digital supply chain

Within five years, 50% of manufacturing supply chains will be robotically and digitally controlled and able to provide direct-to-consumer and home shipments, according to IDC Manufacturing Insights. Additionally, 47% of supply chain leaders believe AI is disruptive and important with respect to supply chain strategies, per a 2016 SCM World survey. With that in mind, 85% of organizations have already adopted or will adopt AI technology into their supply chains within one year, according to a 2016 Accenture report.

Supply chains need AI to aggregate their mass amounts of data. In the supply chain, AI can analyze large data sets and recommend customer service and operations improvements while supporting better working capital management. As corporate systems become more interconnected, providing access to a wider breadth of supply chain data, the opportunity to leverage AI increases.

Let’s look at the potential benefits of using AI to link transportation data with order data:

A logistics enterprise ensures the delivery of a product within two days. With AI, the carrier can view past performances from shipping a similar product on a specific day, using a particular route, which reveals there’s a 25% chance the order will arrive in four days, not two. This information supplies customer service and supply chain professionals with proactive alerts of potential fulfillment challenges.

To take this a step further, AI could also compare historical shipping data to the customer’s requested delivery date to provide recommendations on whether this particular carrier’s performance meets requirements, or if you need to consider a different logistics enterprise that is 15% more expensive, but 25% more likely to deliver the product on time.

Step by step to a more efficient supply chain with AI

There are many opportunities to use AI throughout the supply chain, from buying raw materials/components and converting them into finished products to selling and delivering items to customers. Supply chains can also use AI to end repetitive manual tasks and begin automating processes. This can enable companies to reallocate time and resources to their core business, and other high-value, judgment-based jobs, by using AI for low-value, high-frequency activities.

In an AI-driven selling platform, chatbots can manage many of the sales, customer service, and operations tasks traditionally handled by humans, including interacting with buyers, taking orders, and passing those orders through the supply chain. In warehouse operations, AI-capable robotics and sensors can enable organizations to enhance stacking and retrieval, order picking, stock-level management, and re-ordering processes.

Amazon is currently combining automation with human labor to increase productivity by using robots that can glide quickly across the floor to rearrange items on shelves into neatly organized rows, or alert human workers when they need to stack the shelves with new products or retrieve goods for packaging. And Logistics company DHL is using AI and automation to create self-sufficient forklifts that understand what products need to be moved, where they need to be moved, and when they need to be moved.

Supply chain companies see a path forward with AI

Leveraging AI is an important next step for supply chain companies looking to lower costs and improve productivity. It can enable your organization to spend less time on repetitive processes, such as planning, monitoring, and coordinating, and focus more on innovation and growth.

AI still needs careful monitoring, however, as well as experienced and knowledgeable logistics and operations professionals to ensure it’s being used to its maximum potential.

For more on how AI and advanced tech can help boost your business, see Next-Gen Technology Separates Digital Leaders From The Rest.


Alina Gross

About Alina Gross

Alina Gross is currently pursuing her BA in international business at Heilbronn University. She plans on deepening her knowledge by adding an MA in international marketing. As a working student at SAP, she focuses on marketing and project management topics within the field of supply chain, especially around content marketing, event management and social media.