Why Manufacturers Must Run Live

Harry Blunt

Whether you label it digitization or digitalization, the digital economy is rewriting the rules of business. In this new environment, companies of all sizes must operate their businesses differently while freeing themselves from the constraints of the past.

It’s a time in business where the consumer is king, and access to information and product choice is everywhere. Manufacturers will only survive and thrive if they can Run Live.

As a manufacturer, what can you achieve by running live?

When manufacturers Run Live, they can operate without boundaries, in the moment at speed, with unique and actionable business insights. Running a live manufacturing business restores the balance of sales influence between the manufacturer (seller) and the consumers (buyers) they service. Manufacturers that Run Live do so with more customer insight and less business complexity. They operate with far greater innovation, speed, and predictability, all of which is required to successfully compete in today’s highly disruptive digital economy.

While a digital business is filled with possibilities, it can be equally unsettling and chaotic. It is important that companies Run Live if for no other reason than to bring added order and control to a business environment that is largely characterized by business disruption.

When companies are able to run their operations live with predictable recurring revenues and costs, they are far more profitable and less susceptible to being victimized by market changes. Successful companies have historically always balanced the need to generate more recurring revenue with reduced operating costs. What is new is the demand for improved live business agility and an enhanced level of customer insight and business ecosystem interaction, which are now required to ensure companies can continue to run with predictable results at optimal operating costs.

A company’s focus toward innovation and improving operating efficiencies must become increasingly outwardly focused, starting first with the customer and then extending into the manufacturer’s business ecosystem. Trying to manage corporate innovation and operating efficiencies within department silos, or even within a company’s four walls, is a dated business operating model that won’t work to service an outwardly driven and customer-centric digital economy.

Put customers at the core of your live business

To meet the demands of innovating and operating cost-efficiently in the digital economy, manufacturers must begin with an external view of the world, and that view must always begin with the customer.

Manufacturers must service their customers and run their operations as live, digitized extended supply chains, because while the world has become more connected, it is also far more interdependent. How well a company manages its risks and opportunities around these live, digital interdependencies has a direct impact on the company’s ability to service its clients and on its potential recurring revenues and operating costs.

To achieve differentiated customer value and true operating efficiencies in managing these digital interdependencies, manufacturers must deliver superior customer experiences and operational excellence in four key areas:

  1. Customer-centricity: Mastering “end-to-end” omnichannel commerce from initial order engagement through demand response and same-day product delivery
  1. Individualized products: Having the flexibility to design and manufacture to a lot size of one at mass-production cost efficiencies
  1. Resource scarcity: Developing and safeguarding people talent and assets while ensuring sustainable and compliant products and operations
  1. Sharing economy: Leveraging business networks and digital connectivity to further empower innovation and operating efficiencies throughout the extended business ecosystem

Continue your education on live business and the extended supply chain

On June 14–15, over 500 attendees from small and large manufacturers gathered in Lombard, Illinois, to discuss how leading manufacturers are driving transformational change by leveraging a live and digitized extended supply chain.

To learn how other leading SAP companies are meeting the challenges of competing in a hyper-competitive digital economy, by running Live, please visit our Manufacturing Industries Resource Center.


Harry Blunt

About Harry Blunt

Harry Blunt is the NA Marketing Director for the SAP Extended Supply Chain solution portfolio. The SAP extended supply chain portfolio helps companies run as "Live" digitized businesses while managing critical interdependent business processes from initial product ideas up through product deliveries and services. Incorporating innovations like the Internet of Things, Cloud Computing, and the SAP S/4HANA operating platform, coupled with tightly integrated mobile applications and business networks, we help our customers leverage the capabilities of their entire business ecosystem to obtain greater innovation, stakeholder collaboration, and improved business performance.