Technology Trends Shaping The Way Utilities Work

Lloyd Adams

No one needs to tell you that the digital revolution is here to stay. Digital business is big business. This is especially true now that one-time novelties like the Internet and mass-scale analytics have exited their infancies. It’s safe to assume that while the digital transformation is not yet complete, it has extended to almost every corner of industry.

Chief among the ways in which technology is changing the world is in the realm of utilities. How we get our power matters, as does how it’s metered and distributed. Too little of it and the system isn’t working; too much and it becomes wasteful and inefficient. A happy middle ground both satisfies consumers and conserves resources. So how might the utility organizations use digital resources to make utilities more efficient?

How can we use technology to create a better world?

The wide array of digital resources makes it easier than ever before for utility companies to track their operations. This in turn enables them to respond to energy supply and demand more immediately. It also allows them to deliver electricity in a more responsive and less wasteful way.

The smart grid is a great example of how hyperconnectivity and supercomputing combine. Together they enable a much smarter means of energy distribution. The smart grid uses smart-meter technology in homes, renewable energy, and new data-driven systems to maintain efficient operations and save non-renewable resources.

The digital energy network is another cutting-edge idea. It enables a two-way flow of both power and information. Large stakeholders still help control the flow of electricity and energy. But now consumers can help as well. The result? Better efficiency, less waste.

Who showcases digital business models at their best?

Luckily, some utility front-runners are offering valuable insight into the future for all. Consider CenterPoint Energy. It integrates information technology and operational technology to emphasize streamlined results and conservation.

Or the Tokyo Electric Power Company. It aims to install 27 million residential smart meter devices by 2020. These meters track energy usage and relay it back to the central utility company. Such metering will help the company make better, greener decisions about energy usage.

Then there’s Tesla, which already has a reputation for cutting-edge environmentalism. Its Powerwall lithium ion battery enables homes to store solar energy. This historically tricky feat will allow residents to “go net zero.” That means keeping their home off the grid entirely.

Each digital business models showcases a different strategy. Together, these strategies can transform our current energy economy. The result? Environmental resource management on a scale never before seen.

Will you benefit from going digital?

Yes. Like any powerful technology, these digital business models reward utility companies who adopt them early. Using digital tools to monitor operations and output has many benefits. You can grow your company for stakeholders and shareholders. You can differentiate from competitors. And you can clean up power for the sake of your city and the world.

Of course, most likely you’ve already incorporated a fair bit of digital technology into your operations. If you’re like many utility companies, though, there’s much more you can do. Engage with customers more meaningfully by making them partners in the metering process. Digitize your business to streamline information gathering. Pair up with same or similar businesses to achieve economies of scale

These approaches enable energy portfolio management on scales never before seen. The result for your business goes well past innovation. You’ll also see differentiation, growth, and competitiveness on a whole new level.

For more information on Digital Transformation for Utilities, click here.


Lloyd Adams

About Lloyd Adams

Lloyd Adams is national vice president of Utilities for SAP North America. In this role, he is responsible for sales and customer relations in the SAP Utilities North America practice.