The New Digital Healthcare Patient Experience

Martin Kopp

Digitized healthcare has arrived. And it is only going to get better. Since the 1950s, information technology has had a growing influence on the healthcare industry. And today, more than three-quarters of all patients expect to use digital services in the future. That is, if they are not using them already. Healthcare consumers have become more informed and proactive.

Today, a pregnant woman can schedule a gynecology appointment electronically. Her insurance company probably offers a smartphone app to monitor her health. She can download the app and self-register. The app documents her ongoing health as she updates the profile data. And because her data is stored in the cloud, her gynecologist has immediate access to it.

These are a few examples of the important trends shaping the patient experience with digital innovation. The latest digital solutions are bringing the patient and the healthcare industry closer together. And this digital connectivity means more personalized patient care.

Digital technology is changing the role of the patient. Patients are better informed and more involved in their own health decisions. With greater access to information, they can sometimes self-diagnose certain health issues. Due to digitization, they have better communication with healthcare providers and easier access to their own test results.

Monitoring illness

Healthcare providers are better equipped to gather and analyze data. So, healthcare outcomes are faster and easier to realize. Providers can react earlier to conditions. And they can even sometimes predict medical conditions before any symptoms appear. Therapies are transforming to a more user-centric design. This is all possible because digital networking of data informs caregivers earlier and keeps them informed. We have moved past the patient’s chart as the most important source of information.

Improving wellness

The ability to predict medical conditions gives providers a tool to promote wellness. This is changing the healthcare value chain. Remote monitoring is possible, making trips to the clinic or doctor’s office less necessary. Wearable monitoring devices have changed the medial landscape. And the use of wearable devices is expected to grow. According to the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI), 1.3 billion people will be using fitness trackers by the year 2025. In some regions, this will account for up to 56% of the population. The millennial generation sums up the benefits in a word: convenience.

The blending of physical and digital realms into a common reality is referred to as the Internet of Things (IoT). The IoT makes many things possible that were only dreamed of a few years ago. It extends the reach of information technology. From remote locations, we can electronically monitor and control things in the physical world. Basically, it is the digitizing of the physical world.

With the IoT, MGI predicts a savings in healthcare treatment costs of up to $470 billion per year by 2025. But even more important is the improvement in healthcare. In addition to driving down treatment costs, this will extend healthy life spans and improve the quality of life for millions of people. And it will improve access to healthcare for those who are underserved in the present system. Plus, this extensive use of fitness tracking devices will create a multi-billion dollar industry.

Re-shaping the patient experience

The patients of today and tomorrow have more information and more options than ever before. Patients are already seeing increased value from the Big Data that healthcare professionals now have access to. Patients are more engaged in their own care. We are entering an age of personalized healthcare based on far-reaching knowledge bases.

Because of digital innovation, healthcare consumers can more easily seek relief when they are sick. They can be more involved in disease prevention and self-supported care. With patient-owned medical devices, they are connected to the Big Data of cloud computing. This cloud-based information provides proven treatments and outcomes for specific conditions.

Value chain improvements

The digital value network connects all aspects of the healthcare ecosystem in real time. This connectivity drives better healthcare outcomes that are specifically relevant to the patient. Digital innovation in healthcare improves interactions to provide personalized care based on Big Data. In that respect, you can think of it as Big Medicine for the little guy. A massive database gives healthcare providers a 360-degree view of the patient. Data is stored in the cloud and processed in the core platform.

Services and functions that this efficient system provides include medication reminders for patients. It tracks your health for you, your family, and friends. Remote home monitoring and emergency detection offer an increased level of safety and protection. Remote diagnostics can mean you stay at home instead of being hospitalized. Prediction of organ or other physical failures before they happen can save lives.

SAP software provides a single platform that brings together healthcare providers, patients, and value-added services. It offers a seamless digitization of the entire patient experience. And it provides results in real time, available to all parts of the healthcare ecosystem. This broad connectivity creates an omni-channel, end-to-end patient experience.

To learn more about Digital Transformation for Healthcare, click here.


Martin Kopp

About Martin Kopp

Martin Kopp is the global general manager for Healthcare at SAP. He is responsible for setting the strategy and articulating the vision and direction of SAP's healthcare-provider industry solutions, influencing product development, and fostering executive level relationships key customers, IT influencers, partners, analysts, and media.