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#BigData Terms You Need to Know

Jen Cohen Crompton

Understanding the world of Big Data sounds like a big challenge – and it can be if you aren’t “in the know” about some key terms used in the industry. Below are some top terms that will help you understand the big data conversation and come to a better understanding of how the terms contribute to the big [data] picture.

Top Big Data Terms to Understand the Concept

1. MapReduceA programming paradigm that supports distributed computing on large datasets.
MapReduce is a programming model that was created (and is used) by Google in the early 2000s to process massive amounts of data. It’s name comes from the common functions in programming known as map and reduce, but they serve different functions than the traditional definitions. It is important to understand the concept because MapReduce technologies are responsible for decentralizing data storage and processing to increase the speed and reliability of dealing with large data sets. A popular free implementation is Apache Hadoop.

2. NoSQL DatabasesDocument-oriented databases using a key/value interface rather than SQL (does not use the relational database management system – RDBMS) to classify and organize; created to manage volumes of data that do not have a fixed schema.
NoSQL gained popularity as major companies adopted the system due to an overload of data, which could not use the traditional RDBMS solutions. NoSQL databases  provide quick, efficient performance because captured data is quickly stored using a single identifying key and therefore, can quickly store a lot of transactions.

3. StorageThe technologies that hold the distributed data.
Data can be stored using data centers, which could include any number of various cloud technologies.

4. ServersTechnologies available for renting computing power on remote machines; a program to “serve” the requests of programs.
In big data, servers offer support for data storage and management.

5. ProcessingThe action of extracting valuable information from large datasets.
Processing allows the user to sort through the massive amounts of data and produce information for analysis. While processing, data can be sorted and grouped based on algorithms, but it’s important to understand the limitations and constraints without applying human thought evaluation.

6. Natural Language ProcessingExtracting information from human-created text.
This type of processing requires sorting through data that is created from humans and not necessarily from their “actions.For instance, if you are analyzing Twitter data from the previous six month, you might be looking for keywords and sentiment, which would require National Language Processing.

7. VisualizationViewing graphically represented meaningful data.
As data is collected, stored and then analyzed, it needs to be presented in a way that it can be understood and digested. Programs able to analyze big data can sometimes interpret the data and represent it in a visual display for easier consumption and/or to show results.

8. AcquisitionTechniques for cleaning up messy public data sources.
As data is collected, it is not always in its purest form and/or usable. There are various sources that help take this data and turn it into something that can be processed. 

9. SerializationConverting data structure or object state into a format able to be stored.
Serialization occurs after the data is collected and when it is being processed. As the data gets sorted and pushed around between systems, it may need to be stored. During these steps, the data will require serialization and it will be based on the different languages and APIs.

10. CPUCentralized processing unit; the hardware within a computer, which performs the basic operations of the system (comparable to the “brain”).
CPUs are mentioned in reference to crunching the data.

11. HadoopOpen source implementation (Apache software product).
Hadoop was developed to enable applications to work with thousands of computational independent computers and petabytes of data.

12. Petabytes, exabytes, zettabytesUnits of information used to measure data amounts.
Petabytes = one quadrillion (short scale) bytes, or 1024 terabytes
Exabytes = one quintillion bytes (short scale)
Zettabytes = one sextillion (one long scale trilliard) bytes

source: wikipedia.org

 

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About Jen Cohen Crompton

Jen Cohen Crompton is a SAP Blogging Correspondent reporting on big data, cloud computing, enterprise mobility, analytics, sports and tech, and anything else innovation-related. When she's not blogging, she can be caught marketing, using social media and/or presenting at conferences around the world. Disclosure: Jen is being compensated by SAP to produce a series of articles on the innovation topics covered on this site. The opinions reflected here are her own.

The Right Data At The Right Time, For The Right Kind Of Care

Drew Schiller

I recently had an enlightening discussion with a senior executive at a three-million-patient health system. This health system has developed remote monitoring programs for patients with managed conditions such as hypertension and Type 2 diabetes. Surprisingly, their motivation for investing in preventative technology was not driven by reimbursement incentives, which many argue will be the stimulant of a value-based care shift. Instead, this health system was driven by a single, stark reality: Over the next three to five years, many physicians are retiring and even fewer are entering the workforce, while the number of patients is rising.

Addressing the imminent physician shortage will be a challenge for health systems that are already facing escalating regulatory pressures, an increasing number of patients in need of healthcare, and a growing elderly population being treated for one or more chronic conditions.

The only way to service an increasing patient population with a decreasing workforce is by implementing strategies that yield a magnitude of productivity. I can state confidently, as a technologist, that the only way to create ten times more output without ten times more human capital is with technology.

The burden of chronic disease

It’s important to understand and recognize the burden of chronic diseases on patients’ lives. These diseases impact their day-to-day or even minute-to-minute decision-making. They are expensive and cumbersome to treat for both patients and providers. Our systems are crippling under the financial implications associated with chronic diseases and the poor self-management of patients. Though financial models are not yet in place to cover the full spectrum of remote care, there are financial incentives, which health systems can help drive, that enable physicians to better manage, treat, and empower patients remotely.

Patient-generated health data is key to helping patients self-manage their condition, but the context around that data is essential. People who suffer from diabetes must learn how their dietary habits – when, what, and how much they eat – impact their a1c, blood sugar levels, weight, and insulin dosage. Similarly, this data provides physicians with insight into a patient’s lifestyle and health. Care teams can view sleep data, blood sugar data, fitness data, blood pressure data, and other values critical to better managing patients. Creating a dynamic in which patients receive their data back, contextualized, and in which physicians have an opportunity to treat patients holistically, creates a value-based system.

Patient-generated health data

Disease management programs are commonplace, but extant services are often comprised of regular in-person visits, weekly or monthly phone calls, and manually reported patient data. Challenges to this time- and resource-intensive, hands-on model are introduced within rural populations, where a patient’s medical institution may be two or more hours away, making routine face-to-face visits cumbersome and unrealistic. Also, when a patient is pre-chronic, full reimbursement is not available for the followup visits needed to help prevent the complete onset of a condition.

Technology solutions that produce and integrate patient-generated health data (PGHD) can be leveraged to address many of the challenges faced by patients and physicians today.

Brockton Hospital, part of the Signature Health System in Massachusetts, in partnership with iGetBetter, has started to leverage PGHD to reduce readmissions for patients with heart failure and COPD. These efforts have led to remarkably improved patient care and outcomes as well as a substantial cost savings.

A 2014 pilot involving 31 heart-failure patients aimed to reduce readmissions by utilizing connected blood pressure monitors and weight scales. Data from the devices fed directly into iGetBetter’s care management portal. Without this intervention strategy leveraging PGHD, Brockton typically sees a 28% readmission rate; however, in this study, no patients were readmitted, leading to an immediate savings of $216,000. Programs like this demonstrate the immediate value of PGHD and provide a useful incentive for helping clinicians and IT staff understand how to effectively capture and utilize patient data generated outside of the clinical setting.

Another example is the Validic and SAP partnership, in which patient-generated health data from more than 400 personal and in-home medical devices is pulled into the HANA Cloud Platform. Together, this joining of platforms enables data to be turned into actionable insights, allowing patients to improve their health and quality of life.

Engaging with patients in preventive care measures, whether through mobile or other means, and obtaining access to real-time status data is essential to improving clinical outcomes and controlling costs amidst the impending physician shortage. By capturing and integrating reliable PGHD with other EHR data to guide clinical interventions and care decisions, health systems will have an advantage that will pay off in care quality and financial returns.

To learn more about turning real-time data into actionable insights, visit SAP Booth #543 at #HIMSS17, February 19-23 and join the conversation with Drew Schiller at 2pm (ET) on Wednesday, February 22.

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Drew Schiller

About Drew Schiller

Drew Schiller co-founded and serves as the Chief Executive Officer of Validic, the leading digital health platform for connecting patient-generated data from apps, wearables, and in-home medical devices to the healthcare system. At Validic, Drew leads the corporate strategy, drives key day-to-day initiatives, and works closely with senior executives at partner organizations to stay ahead of the innovation curve.

What’s The Future Of IoT And Mobility?

Rick Knowles and Michael Rander

Digital transformation is clearly essential to companies’ future success, as businesses that manage the digital transformation process well are already seeing higher growth, profit, and employee engagement rates than their peers, according to the Leaders 2020 Research Brief. Digital transformation, however, is not merely about the implementation of new technology but, just as important, about the usage of this technology.

As we go about our private lives, we are increasingly relying on the Internet of Things (IoT) to connect us to myriad applications, services, service providers, and vendors. We are connected to the IoT through everything from our smartphones, wearable fitness devices, and personal virtual assistants, to connected cars, connected homes, GPS locators, and a wide variety of sensors. All of this happens in an increasingly seamless fashion, and our usage of these technologies is affecting virtually every aspect of our daily routines and tasks.

200 billion connected devices = Death by data if you don’t get it right

From a corporate perspective, the massive amounts of data generated – through these devices and the billions of enterprise devices and sensors that are already connected (15 billion devices in 2015 based on an Intel infographic) – is creating the potential for an entirely new level of integration and usage of data into our business decisions. Oftentimes though, the pure scale and inherent complexity are underestimated when it comes to making efficient and user-friendly enterprise applications, which can be leveraged across all functions of the company as needed. As projected in the infographic, exponential growth of IoT will reach 200 billion devices in 2020, so the task of making real-time sense of the incoming information is not likely to get any less daunting.

Combine this endless inflow of unstructured data with the move towards the state of a “Live Business,” where information is available in real time and where organizational structures, business decision-making processes, and resource allocations are in essence liquid and able to shift in the moment, depending on the needs of customers. The need for having actionable data on hand at all times becomes clear.

Combining IoT and mobility for real competitive advantage and new business models

So, what really makes the difference when companies are developing use cases and real-world applications to gain this competitive edge using the available data and technology in preparation for the future?

For MAPAL, a leading provider of precision tools and machining solutions, the real leap forward came through the combination of IoT and mobility, which moved the company from selling tools to also being a service provider. Taking a two-pronged approach, MAPAL first created a mobile app with scanning, photo, and voice recognition capabilities, enabling both their own people as well as their customers’ employees to react instantly to broken parts where identified. This initiates the replacement process within seconds instead of using a manual-reporting process, which previously took several days.

The second step was building an IoT platform that can combine and manage all of the data related to specific tools in a secure, central, cloud-based platform that can be maintained and accessed throughout the lifecycle of the tools. This collaborative Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) model works like a data highway, where customers and suppliers jointly maintain and use tool-related data, based on defined guidelines and access rights. The mobile app and the cloud-based platform work together to gather input from the app, sensor data to track stock movements from warehouses, and customer data. Over time, this will enable machine learning and predictive forecasting to further reduce downtime and enable a much more productive workforce. Ultimately, autonomous workflows could be created that could order new parts without human interaction.

For MAPAL, the procurement of tools can now be done seamlessly across multiple locations, resulting in optimized stock levels and a more cost-effective purchasing process. This, in turn, allows suppliers to offer new services to customers because they can document test results and make those results available to multiple clients via the platform. The application programming interface (API) technology also ensures that the open platform connection to the backend system is always fast and reliable. This is driving digital transformation of the business model and sets up new ways to interact with partners and customers alike.

Enabling innovation for your company

Recently, companies such as Apple, Amazon, Facebook, Microsoft, and Google have all opened up to enable third-party developers to access their artificial intelligence (AI) bots (Siri, Alexa, Cortana, etc.), and according to a recent Forbes article, a new generation of AI-based apps will take the current evolution even further. In addition, recent technology agreements like the Apple and SAP partnership are taking innovation to the next level with advances in AI, IoT, and a new software development kit (SDK) by SAP for iOS mobility to drive even greater innovation for enterprise employees and customers. Bringing together AI, IoT, and mobility into a common platform to build new contextual native enterprise apps will not only create new applications and usages for AI and mobility, but will create the next level of potential innovation.

No innovation, no growth

Without innovation, there is limited opportunity for growth, according to a recent Fortune interview that addressed the importance of mobile innovation in the enterprise. As we connect everything from nano-robots to portable healthcare monitoring devices, from massive industrial machinery to your home vacuum, the possibilities for increased employee engagement, process optimization, customer satisfaction, and new Live Business models are opening up. It is, however, up to us to harness the data we are working with to make it mobile, easily accessible, and real-time actionable at the moment that it’s needed by our partners, our customers, or us. The mobile revolution is just beginning – and the possibilities are endless.

Discover how the Apple and SAP partnership is revolutionizing mobile apps for the enterprise.

Learn how to cut through complexity with enterprise mobile apps.

Find out why going mobile is all about empathy.

Learn how to forget the backend and focus on the user.

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Rick Knowles

About Rick Knowles

Rick Knowles is senior vice president (SVP) and general manager (GM) of the partnership between SAP SE and Apple, Inc. In this role, he oversees the strategic roadmap in building state-of-the-art applications for some of the most complex business systems in the world. Rick has been with SAP for close to 20 years, where he has held executive positions such as SVP and chief of staff, GM of One Customer Experience, and SVP and chief operating officer for SAP Americas, the company’s largest geographic market. You can follow him on Twitter @RickKnowlesSAP.

About Michael Rander

Michael Rander is the Global Research Director for Future Of Work at SAP. He is an experienced project manager, strategic and competitive market researcher, operations manager as well as an avid photographer, athlete, traveler and entrepreneur. Share your thoughts with Michael on Twitter @michaelrander.

3 Ways Robots Will Co-Evolve with Humans

Christopher Koch

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About Christopher Koch

Christopher Koch is the Editorial Director of the SAP Center for Business Insight. He is an experienced publishing professional, researcher, editor, and writer in business, technology, and B2B marketing. Share your thoughts with Chris on Twitter @Ckochster.

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Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Drew Schiller

About Drew Schiller

Drew Schiller co-founded and serves as the Chief Executive Officer of Validic, the leading digital health platform for connecting patient-generated data from apps, wearables, and in-home medical devices to the healthcare system. At Validic, Drew leads the corporate strategy, drives key day-to-day initiatives, and works closely with senior executives at partner organizations to stay ahead of the innovation curve.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Carolyn Beal

About Carolyn Beal

Carolyn Beal is senior director of Solution Marketing for Social Software at SAP. Her specialties include product marketing, marketing communications, CRM, and demand generation.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Jayne Landry

About Jayne Landry

Jayne Landry is the global vice president and general manager for Business Intelligence at SAP. Ms. Landry joined Crystal Decisions in 2002 and came into SAP through the Business Objects acquisition in 2007. A seasoned executive with 20+ years of experience in the technology sector, Jayne has held leadership roles in high-tech companies in the CRM, mobility, and cloud applications space. Ms. Landry holds a Bachelor of Commerce degree from the University of Auckland, and has continued executive development with Queen’s University, Ontario, and through work with the Sauder School of Business at the University of British Columbia.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim and Michael Rander

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Rick Knowles

About Rick Knowles

Rick Knowles is senior vice president (SVP) and general manager (GM) of the partnership between SAP SE and Apple, Inc. In this role, he oversees the strategic roadmap in building state-of-the-art applications for some of the most complex business systems in the world. Rick has been with SAP for close to 20 years, where he has held executive positions such as SVP and chief of staff, GM of One Customer Experience, and SVP and chief operating officer for SAP Americas, the company’s largest geographic market. You can follow him on Twitter @RickKnowlesSAP.

About Michael Rander

Michael Rander is the Global Research Director for Future Of Work at SAP. He is an experienced project manager, strategic and competitive market researcher, operations manager as well as an avid photographer, athlete, traveler and entrepreneur. Share your thoughts with Michael on Twitter @michaelrander.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Florian Wagner

About Florian Wagner

Florian Wagner is marketing director for IT audience messaging at SAP. Together with his team, he is responsible to address the IT audience and to drive relevant thought leadership topics. He writes about technology trends on digital transformation, cloud and platform strategies with a focus on customer experiences.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

About Michael Brenner

Michael Brenner is a globally-recognized keynote speaker, author of  The Content Formula and the CEO of Marketing Insider GroupHe has worked in leadership positions in sales and marketing for global brands like SAP and Nielsen, as well as for thriving startups. Today, Michael shares his passion on leadership and marketing strategies that deliver customer value and business impact. He is recognized by the Huffington Post as a Top Business Keynote Speaker and   a top  CMO influencer by Forbes.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Verena Wiszinski

About Verena Wiszinski

Verena Wiszinski is a Senior Integrated Marketing Specialist within the Global IT Audience Marketing team at SAP. She enjoys staying connected with customers and thought leaders and talking first hand with them about their experiences, thoughts, and needs within business transformation.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness