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IT Trends That Matter For 2016

Hu Yoshida

Each year, analysts predict some of the upcoming trends in the technology industry. Here is a look at some of the IT trends that matter for 2016, according to Hu Yoshida, chief technology officer at Hitachi Data Systems (HDS).

A greater focus on application and analytics

1. IT skills undergo transformation

To meet the challenges of IT transformation, IT must offload the grunt work that ties its staff to infrastructure management and operations and start to develop specialist skills in areas such as cloud enablement, analytics, DevOps, mobile, and business solutions. This transformation of IT skills will involve a change in culture and will require the commitment of both business and IT leaders.

2. DevOps adoption accelerates application delivery

DevOps is a software development methodology where operations and development engineers work together throughout the application cycle, resulting in high IT performance. Companies with high IT performance are twice as likely to exceed their profitability, market share, and productivity goals.

3. Data warehouses transition into data lakes

Big Data analytics involves the processing of large amounts of heterogeneous data derived from multiple sources and across multiple knowledge domains. Data lakes enable this by bringing together data sources in their original state which can then be analyzed by applications that are brought to the data. They must also be able to incorporate existing data warehouses to leverage the investments that have already been made.

4. IT takes control of provisioning analytics platforms

Business leaders will look to IT to make investments in analytics platforms, acknowledging the fact that IT has a better understanding of security, data privacy, integration, and the service level requirements of the business. This will reverse the shadow IT trend of business units acquiring their own analytics platforms and tools and creating their own data silos.

Infrastructure technologies drive efficiencies

5. Converged solutions replace reference architectures

Instead of providing reference architectures detailing best practices for application enablement, vendors will begin to deliver these best practices as templates implemented through converged solutions. The converged infrastructure offers a more evolved platform for deriving greater cost efficiencies and time savings by allowing IT resources to be managed more cohesively.

6. In-memory databases gain traction

The move to in-memory databases will gather momentum as faster reporting and analysis deliver a clear competitive advantage in today’s real-time business environment. Developments such as the consolidation of SAP’s business suite onto the HANA in-memory database with S/4 HANA, and the emergence of converged solutions and cloud service providers, will help simplify IT and facilitate this migration.

7. Flash devices begin to replace high-performance disks

The availability of multi-terabyte flash devices will enable flash to compete with high-performance 15K RPM disk drives on a capacity-cost basis. As a result, the majority of storage systems delivered in 2016 will contain a percentage of flash to boost response times and reduce the cost of managing storage performance.

IT leadership drives innovation

8. Businesses prepare for next-gen cloud

According to a study by The Economist, some of the best practices that will help business leaders make the most of their cloud opportunities include improving supplier selection; choosing the right cloud service for the right task; making better use of integrators to connect cloud services to existing IT infrastructure; and considering factors such as cloud’s potential to improve business operations and boost employee efficiency.

9. IT infrastructure companies will be disrupted

As IT begins to focus more on application delivery, analytics, and the Internet of Things, pure-play infrastructure companies will try to cope with declining revenues by splitting off some parts of their business, acquiring new infrastructure companies, or merging with other infrastructure companies to drive economies of scale. However, in the longer term, they will have to be able to integrate IT with operational technology to deliver solutions around the Internet of Things that matter, in areas such as public safety, transportation, health, and life sciences.

10. IT plays leadership role in the 3rd Platform

IT will play a more proactive role in leading businesses through the transformation driven by social, mobile, analytics, and cloud, collectively known as the 3rd Platform. Contrary to the view that IT no longer plays a dominant role in driving enterprise technology spending, we believe that the compelling value of IT lies in its ability to implement 3rd Platform technologies in accordance with corporate requirements for security, data protection, availability, and collaboration. If IT does not step up to this leadership role, the result will be silos of information and duplication of processes that will inhibit business growth.

Please view the webinar discussing the top 10 IT trends that I see for 2016. This piece features insights from Greg Knieriemen, our technical evangelist, and Adrian Deluca, our Asia Pacific CTO. Greg and Adrian added their own perspectives on these trends. I would also like to hear your views. As you will see, I am expecting a major transformation to happen in IT and in the vendor community.

For an in-depth look at the multiple factors driving digital transformation, download the SAP eBook, Digital Disruption: How Digital Technology is Transforming Our World.

For more information on how the digital age is affecting business, download the SAP eBook, The Digital Economy: Reinventing the Business World.

The article originally appeared on Hitachi Data Systems Community and is republished with the author’s permission.

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Hu Yoshida

About Hu Yoshida

Hu Yoshida is responsible for defining the technical direction of Hitachi Data Systems. Currently, he leads the company's effort to help customers address data life cycle requirements and resolve compliance, governance and operational risk issues. He was instrumental in evangelizing the unique Hitachi approach to storage virtualization, which leveraged existing storage services within Hitachi Universal Storage Platform® and extended it to externally-attached, heterogeneous storage systems. Yoshida is well-known within the storage industry, and his blog has ranked among the "top 10 most influential" within the storage industry as evaluated by Network World. In October of 2006, Byte and Switch named him one of Storage Networking’s Heaviest Hitters and in 2013 he was named one of the "Ten Most Impactful Tech Leaders" by Information Week.

Real-Time Data Transforms Political Journalism, But Context Remains Vital

John Graham

The runup to the 2016 U.S. election is being covered in interesting new ways by the political media, with analysis of Big Data and real-time opinion polling offering journalists much deeper insight than ever before. The trend of “data journalism” is peaking as the media embraces advanced technologies that allow them to deliver a new breed of numbers-driven, fact-based journalism.

The tools being used for data journalism open up possibilities for fresh perspectives, more in-depth reporting, and new stories behind the numbers that have never been seen before. Traditional journalists are beginning to see how data journalism can complement their reporting, and the U.S. election is serving as an ideal testing ground. Political reporters are lapping up the improved data literacy and access to objective analysis, which is helping to make their reports more thorough and informative.

Consequently, American voters are becoming digital voters. They have access to real-time, data-driven information and public sentiment, which is empowering them with broader insight. They’re relying on this to help them make up their minds before they cast their vote, and it’s given many voters a renewed interest in becoming informed citizens able to make an educated choice.

However, the rise of data-driven journalism brings with it a potential pitfall for media organizations and readers alike. Digital information overload will bring about a fatigue around numbers if reporting quantity becomes more highly valued than quality. Having access to mountains of data is a huge benefit, but a reporter still has to be a journalist first to ensure they’re not getting buried under the numbers and missing the stories.

In other words, a political journalist still needs to be a politico, not just a statistician. They could fall into the trap of placing too much importance on meaningless correlations as indicators of voter sentiment, losing their grasp on what made them a great political reporter in the first place. As data gets bigger, this will become harder to resist. So they need to become experts in making Big Data small—rather than obsessing over the numbers, obsessing over figuring out what they really mean. In doing that, they have an unprecedented opportunity to make people more informed rather than simply overwhelming with them a series of conflicting data sets.

Some media organizations are already tackling the challenge of remaining relevant in a world of information overload. Using big data and visualizations, they are making great strides in making data journalism more accessible to reporters, politicos, and voters, which is proving its worth in giving political reporting a new lease of life.

Reuters’ Polling Explorer tool is an example of how this is being done, offering up customizable data visualizations focusing on the biggest talking points in the U.S. leading up to the election. It’s an entirely new scale of public opinion measurement, presented in a way anyone can understand and use, while enabling Reuters to usher in its own improved brand of accurate, fact-based, and timely journalism.

We can see the true potential of using real-time data analysis to measure up-to-the-minute public opinion in one poll on the most important problem facing the US today. Immediately after the Paris attacks in November, terrorism skyrocketed way above the economy as the number-one issue, rising sharply again straight after the December San Bernardino attack. For Reuters, this is just one of many examples of their greatly increased ability to find outliers in the data.

Reuters Polling Explorer runs on SAP HANA, an in-memory data platform that allows Reuters to access and analyze 100 million survey responses for quicker and more efficient reporting of public opinion.

For more on data analytics in today’s media environment, see How Big Data Is Changing The News Industry.

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John Graham

About John Graham

John Graham is president of SAP Canada. Driving growth across SAP’s industry-leading cloud, mobile, and database solutions, he is helping more than 9,500 Canadian customers in 25 industries become best-run businesses.

Smart Machines Create Markets For Cyber-Physical Advances

Marion Heindenreich

Today, industrial machines are more intelligent than ever before. These intelligent machines are changing companies in many ways.

Why smart machines?

Mobile networked computers were a key breakthrough for making smart machines. Big Data allows machines and computers to store information and analyze complex patterns. Cloud computing offers broad access to information and more storage.

These computerized machines are both physical and virtual. Some call them “cyber-physical” machines. Technology lets them be self-aware and connected to each other and larger systems.

Businesses change their approaches

Intelligent machines allow companies to innovate in many areas. For one, the value proposition for customers is evolving. Businesses now model and plan in different ways in many industries.

Makers of industrial machines and parts work in new ways within the organization. Engineering now partners with mechanical, electronic, and software staff to develop new products. Manufacturing now seamlessly ties what happens on the shop floor to the customer.

Service models are changing too. Scheduled and reactionary servicing of machines is fading. Now intelligent machines track themselves. Machines detect problems and report them automatically. Major problems or failures are predicted and reported.

A data mining example

One good industrial example is mining, which can be dangerous and difficult. As ores become scarce, the costs of mining have increased.

“Smart machines” started in mining in the late 1990s. Software and hardware let remote users change settings. Operators moved hydraulic levers from a safe distance. Sensors observed performance and diagnosed issues.

Data cables connected machines to computers on the surface. Continuous and remote monitoring of the machines grew. Over time, embedded sensors helped improve monitoring, diagnostics, and data storage.

The technology means workers only go underground to fix specific issues. As a result, accident and injury risk is lower.

New wireless technology now lets mining companies connect data from many mine sites. Service centers access large amounts of data and can improve performance. Maintenance is prioritized and equipment downtime is reduced.

Opportunity abounds

For companies the time is now. Today, mobile “connected things” generate 17% of the digital universe. By 2020 that share grows to 27%.

You might not be investing in this so-called “Internet of Things” (devices that connect to each other). But it’s a good bet your competitors are. A December 2015 study reported 33% of industrial companies are investing in the Internet of Things. Another 25% are considering it.

There are risks

This new dawning era of manufacturing is exciting. But there are concerns. Cyber attacks on the Internet of Things are not new. But as the use of intelligent machines grows, the threat of cyber attacks in industry grows.

Data confidentiality and privacy are concerns. So too are software and hardware vulnerabilities. Exposure to attack lies not just in the virtual space but the physical too. Tampering with unattended machines and theft pose serious risk.

To address these threats, industries must invest in cybersecurity along with smart machines.

Conclusion

The potential advantages of smart machines are staggering. They can reshape industries and change how companies produce new products and create new markets.

For more information, please download the white paper Digital Manufacturing: Powering the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

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Marion Heindenreich

About Marion Heindenreich

Marion Heidenreich is a solution manager for the SAP Industrial Machinery and Components Business Unit who focuses on solution innovations like Product Costing on SAP HANA and cloud solutions, as well as providing financial and business analysis for industry business strategy definition and business planning.

The Robotics Race

Stephanie Overby

As robotic technologies continue to advance, along with related technologies such as speech and image recognition, memory and analytics, and virtual and augmented reality, better, faster, and cheaper robots will emerge. These machines – sophisticated, discerning, and increasingly autonomous – are certain to have an impact on business and society. But will they bring job displacement and danger or create new categories of employment and protect humankind?

We talked to SAP’s Kai Goerlich, along with Doug Stephen of the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition and Brett Kennedy from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, about the advances we can expect in robotics, robots’ limitations, and their likely impact on the world.

SAP_Robotics_QA_images2400x16002

qa_qWhat are the biggest drivers of the robot future?

Kai Goerlich: Several trends will come together to drive the robotics market in the next 15 to 20 years. The number of connected things and sensors will grow to the billions and the data universe will likewise explode. We think the speed of analytics will increase, with queries answered in milliseconds. Image and voice recognition – already quite good – will surpass human capabilities. And the virtual and augmented reality businesses will take off. These technologies are all building blocks for a new form of robotics that will vastly expand today’s capabilities in a diversity of forms and applications.

Brett Kennedy: When I was getting out of school, there weren’t that many people working in robotics. Now kids in grade school are exposed to a lot of things that I had to learn on the job, so they come into the workplace with a lot more knowledge and fewer preconceptions about what robots can or can’t do based on their experiences in different industries. That results in a much better-trained workforce in robotics, which I think is the most important thing.

In addition, many of the parts that we need for more sophisticated robots are coming out of other fields. We could never create enough critical mass to develop these technologies specifically for robotics. But we’re getting them from other places. Improvements in battery technology, which enable a robot to function without being plugged in, are being driven by industries such as mobile electronics and automotive, for example. Our RoboSimian has a battery drive originally designed for an electric motorcycle.

qa_qDo you anticipate a limit to the tasks robots will be able to master as these core technologies evolve?

Goerlich: Robots will take over more and more complex functions, but I think the ultimate result will be that new forms of human-machine interactions will emerge. Robots have advantages in crunching numbers, lifting heavy objects, working in dangerous environments, moving with precision, and performing repetitive tasks. However, humans still have advantages in areas such as abstraction, curiosity, creativity, dexterity, fast and multidimensional feedback, self-motivation, goal setting, and empathy. We’re also comparatively lightweight and efficient.

Doug Stephen: We’re moving toward a human-machine collaboration approach, which I think will become the norm for more complex tasks for a very long time. Even when we get to the point of creating more-complex and general-purpose robots, they won’t be autonomous. They’ll have a great deal of interaction with some sort of human teammate or operator.

qa_qHow about the Mars Rover? It’s relatively autonomous already.

Kennedy: The Mars Rover is autonomous to a certain degree. It is capable of supervised autonomy because there’s no way to control it at that distance with a joystick. But it’s really just executing the intent of the operator here on the ground.

In 2010, DARPA launched its four-year Autonomous Robotic Manipulator Challenge to create machines capable of carrying out complex tasks with only high-level human involvement. Some robots completed the challenge, but they were incredibly slow. We may get to a point where robots can do these sorts of things on their own. But they’re just not as good as people at this point. I don’t think we’re all going to be coming home to robot butlers anytime soon.

Stephen: It’s extremely difficult to program robots to behave as humans do. When we trip over something, we can recover quickly, but a robot will topple over and damage itself. The problem is that our understanding of our human abilities is limited. We have to figure out how to formally define the processes that human beings or any legged animals use to maintain balance or to walk and then tell a robot how to do it.

You have to be really explicit in the instructions that you give to these machines. Amazon has been working on these problems for a while with its “picking challenge”: How do you teach a robot to pick and pack boxes the way a human does? Right now, it’s a challenge for robots to identify what each item is.

qa_qSo if I’m not coming home to a robot butler in 20 years, what am I coming home to?

Goerlich: We naturally tend to imagine humanoid robots, but I think the emphasis will be on human-controlled robots, not necessarily humanshaped units. Independent robots will make sense in some niches, but they are more complex and expensive. The symbiosis of human and machine is more logical. It will be the most efficient way forward. Robotic suits, exoskeletons, and robotic limbs with all kinds of human support functions will be the norm. The future will be more Iron Man than Terminator.

qa_qWhat will be the impact on the job market as robots become more advanced?

SAP_Robotics_QA_images2400x16004Goerlich: The default fear is of a labor-light economy where robots do most of the work and humans take what’s left over. But that’s lastcentury thinking. Robots won’t simply replace workers on the assembly line. In fact, we may not have centralized factories anymore; 3D printing and the maker movement could change all that. And it is probably not the Terminator scenario either, where humanoid robots take over the world and threaten humankind. The indicators instead point to human-machine coevolution.

There’s no denying that advances in robotics and artificial intelligence will displace some jobs performed by humans today. But for every repetitive job that is lost to automation, it’s possible that a more interesting, creative job will take its place. This will require humans to focus on the skills that robots can’t replicate – and, of course, rethink how we do things and how the economy works.

qa_qWhat can businesses do today to embrace the projected benefits of advanced robotics?

Kennedy: Experiment. The very best things that we’ve been able to produce have come from people having the tools an d then figuring out how they can be used. I don’t think we understand the future well enough to be able to predict exactly how robots are going to be used, but I think we can say that they certainly will be used. Stephanie Overby is an independent writer and editor focused on the intersection of business and technology.

Stephanie Overby  is an independent writer and editor focused on the intersection of business and technology

To learn more about how humans and robots will co-evolve, read the in-depth report Bring Your Robot to Work.

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What Is The Key To Rapid Innovation In Healthcare?

Paul Clark

Healthcare technology has already made incredible advancements, but digital transformation of the healthcare industry is still considered in its infancy. According to the SAP eBook, Connected Care: The Digital Pulse of Global Healthcare, the possibilities and opportunities that lie ahead for the Internet of Healthcare Things (IoHT) are astounding.

Many health organizations recognize the importance of going digital and have already deployed programs involving IoT, cloud, Big Data, analytics, and mobile technologies. However, over the last decade, investments in many e-health programs have delivered only modest returns, so the progress of healthcare technology has been slow out of the gate.

What’s slowing the pace of healthcare innovation?

In the past, attempts at rapid innovation in healthcare have been bogged down by a slew of stakeholders, legacy systems, and regulations that are inherent to the industry. This presents some Big Data challenges with connected healthcare, such as gathering data from disparate silos of medical information. Secrecy is also an ongoing challenge, as healthcare providers, researchers, pharmaceutical companies, and academic institutions tend to protect personal and proprietary data. These issues have caused enormous complexity and have delayed or deterred attempts to build fully integrated digital healthcare systems.

So what is the key to rapid innovation?

According to the Connected Care eBook, healthcare organizations can overcome these challenges by using new technologies and collaborating with other players in the healthcare industry, as well as partners outside of the industry, to get the most benefit out of digital technology.

To move forward with digital transformation in healthcare, there is a need for digital architectures and platforms where a number of different technologies can work together from both a technical and a business perspective.

The secret to healthcare innovation: connected health platforms

New platforms are emerging that foster collaboration between different technologies and healthcare organizations to solve complex medical system challenges. These platforms can support a broad ecosystem of partners, including developers, researchers, and healthcare organizations. Healthcare networks that are connected through this type of technology will be able to accelerate the development and delivery of innovative, patient-centered solutions.

Platforms and other digital advancements present exciting new business opportunities for numerous healthcare stakeholders striving to meet the increasing expectations of tech-savvy patients.

The digital evolution of the healthcare industry may still be in its infancy, but it is growing up fast as new advancements in technology quickly develop. Are you ready for the next phase of digital transformation in the global healthcare industry?

For an in-depth look at how technology is changing the face of healthcare, download the SAP eBook Connected Care: The Digital Pulse of Global Healthcare.

See how the digital era is affecting the business environment in the SAP eBook The Digital Economy: Reinventing the Business World.

Discover the driving forces behind digital transformation in the SAP eBook Digital Disruption: How Digital Technology is Transforming Our World.

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Paul Clark

About Paul Clark

Paul Clark is the Senior Director of Technology Partner Marketing at SAP. He is responsible for developing and executing partner marketing strategies, activities, and programs in joint go-to-market plans with global technology partners. The goal is to increase opportunities, pipeline, and revenue through demand generation via SAP's global and local partner ecosystems.