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How CIOs Become Invaluable In The Age Of SaaS

Daniel Newman

With SaaS picking up speed, you may have heard whispers about the future of the CIO. Will the role remain necessary? Will it still serve a critical function in the running of a business, especially when you factor in the emergence of “Everything” as a Service (XaaS)?

The answers are yes, yes, and yes. CIOs are still the glue that holds together incumbent business technology, especially if you factor in external influences like Shadow IT, SaaS, and BYOD. What is it precisely that makes CIOs invaluable in this ever-changing environment? Let’s break it down.

Are CIOs on shaky ground?

SaaS and cloud—basically XaaS—surround how we work and how we consume in today’s world. All you have to do is swipe a credit card to use the latest and greatest application. That’s handy for consumers, but what about for those tasked with procuring IT for companies? Making tech purchasing decisions is no longer a highly centralized process; rather, it’s moving into the spokes of organizations. In fact, many are still feeling the sting of that 2012 Gartner prediction that CMOs will spend more on IT than CIOs by the year 2017. If you haven’t heard of that one, I’d be surprised. It’s been highly discussed, and even CIO Magazine has reported on a proposed “CIO-to-CMO transition of power” as the reverberations from Gartner’s report still rattle some industry leaders.

Whether you agree with the Gartner prediction or not, it’s fair to say it’s stirred up a debate about the viability of the CIO in the age of SaaS and XaaS. There just might be a plus side here: Maybe all this back and forth has started what is actually a healthy discussion about the role of CIOs in this evolving tech space. Longevity is possible, though, if CIOs can re-hone their focus on leveraging their skills to developing robust infrastructure to support company scale, securing complex networks and creating a tech environment where company employees can thrive in productivity; hardly an easy task.

Keys to CIO longevity

It is critical that CIOs are masters of the domain of security, compliance, and—perhaps—a new role: education.

Security. We talk a lot about internal and external security, and for good reason. All that Big Data rolling in and out of IT departments can mean big risks for CIOs, so their security efforts must be on-point at all times. Are data scientists getting to the right information quickly and safely? Is proprietary information gated appropriately? What’s the disaster recovery plan for on-premise data center failures? All these questions and more are important to ask, and there’s no room for error.

Compliance. While using a variety of cloud services for day-to-day company operations can bring versatility to overall operations, it can also bring more compliance issues. CIOs can benefit from reinventing their roles to focus on staying ahead of compliance requirements from a big-picture perspective. That way, there will be no aggravating (and costly) downtime due to noncompliance, and everyone in the C-Suite can breathe easily knowing all those compliance boxes remain checked at all times.

Education. With tools and technology changing at breakneck pace, it is nearly impossible for CIOs to keep up with every new tool out there. No matter how big their team, CIO’s can’t validate every application. On top of that, it isn’t exactly in their best interests to become a bottleneck of productivity. Teaching employees about security and compliance risks is a great way to get them to see the difference between innocently downloading the latest consumer-level app, and inadvertently putting company data at risk.

Plus, focusing on inter-company IT education provides job security for CIOs—the tech landscape is evolving into a more do-it-yourself, BYOD space, but there will always be a need for experts to provide guidance, advice, policy, and oversight.

A role revised

If CIOs can lock down internal and external security risks, help the company stay ahead of compliance requirements that can bog down a company, and become a center of excellence for helping employees maximize the adoption of resources, they will put themselves on a much stronger footing. This is especially important in a world where many have tried to provocatively stir the pot, inferring that CIOs are a fleeting trend.

How do you see the role of the CIO evolving as SaaS and “XaaS” continue to dominate boardrooms and budgets? What’s the C-Suite of the future look like for your company? It’s certainly not a black and white issue—there’s lots of gray area and many components to discuss. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

This post was brought to you by IBM Global Technology Services. For more content like this, visit Point B and Beyond 

The post How CIOs Become Invaluable In the Age of SaaS appeared first on Millennial CEO.

Image credit: StockSnap.io

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About Daniel Newman

Daniel Newman serves as the Co-Founder and CEO of EC3, a quickly growing hosted IT and Communication service provider. Prior to this role Daniel has held several prominent leadership roles including serving as CEO of United Visual. Parent company to United Visual Systems, United Visual Productions, and United GlobalComm; a family of companies focused on Visual Communications and Audio Visual Technologies. Daniel is also widely published and active in the Social Media Community. He is the Author of Amazon Best Selling Business Book "The Millennial CEO." Daniel also Co-Founded the Global online Community 12 Most and was recognized by the Huffington Post as one of the 100 Business and Leadership Accounts to Follow on Twitter. Newman is an Adjunct Professor of Management at North Central College. He attained his undergraduate degree in Marketing at Northern Illinois University and an Executive MBA from North Central College in Naperville, IL. Newman currently resides in Aurora, Illinois with his wife (Lisa) and his two daughters (Hailey 9, Avery 5). A Chicago native all of his life, Newman is an avid golfer, a fitness fan, and a classically trained pianist

More Resources, More Problems

Danielle Beurteaux

This is the second of a two-part series on resource volatility. As noted in the first post, globalization has created an environment of resource volatility. This post, with numbers 11 through 20 on the list, describes resources that are more stable than the previous 10. However, that doesn’t mean there isn’t turmoil, whether that’s environmental concerns in Indonesia’s palm oil production industry, or community organization for water rights in Chile. And, of course, whatever China does, the markets follow.

Top resources and trends

11. Natural Gas

According to the International Energy Agency, most natural gas comes from Russia, the United States, Canada, Qatar, and Iran, and the countries that use the most are the U.S., Russia, China, and Iran. There are sufficient reserves of natural gas, again according to the IEA’s projections, that should last past the year 2040. Liquefied natural gas, which is produced mostly by Qatar, with Australia set to overtake Malaysia for second place, has had a flat market recently. There isn’t the demand to keep up with increased production, so liquefied natural gas producers are looking for new markets, like cruise lines, to grow demand.

12. Tin

Most of the world’s tin comes from China and Indonesia. The tin market tanked last year because of less demand and lots of tin, although it did rally in July and then improve earlier this year, mostly because Indonesia is exporting less and easing the flood of tin on the market.

13. Gold

It seems like everyone’s crazy for gold right now. The precious metal is often perceived as a safer investment than other asset classes, and it’s up 20% this year. Famed investor George Soros just bought $264 million worth of shares in Barrick Gold. The Toronto-based gold-mining company is the world’s largest. Gold prices bumped down a bit while the market waited on the Federal Reserve’s meeting minutes, but some are saying gold will soon recover – and then some.

14. Nickel

Russia, Canada, and New Caledonia are the largest producers of nickel. Most is used to make stainless steel. Like several other commodities we’ve examined, there is more production than demand of nickel at the moment, which has led to depressed prices. China is a big consumer of nickel for stainless steel, and the country is using less because of a slowing real estate market.

15. Beef

The global demand for beef is up, but production is down due to a variety of factors. One is Australia’s decreased production due to drought conditions, which will mean 300,000 tons less beef for export this year. As Australia is a favored trading partner of the U.S., that will affect the American beef market. A recent study from Radobank predicts that China will increase live cattle imports for domestic processing, and Brazil will enter the U.S. market as well.

16. Wheat

It’s a good year for wheat. North American wheat production is doing well, although levels are down from the previous year, with five percent less planted in the U.S. and six percent less in Canada. According to the most recent USDA World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report, total U.S. wheat supplies and use are up six percent and seven percent, respectively. Globally, the report projects a two percent increase in wheat supplies, and consumption will increase, too.

17. Iron Ore

Earlier this year, the iron ore market jumped, reportedly because of the Chinese government’s moves to help along the country’s economy. Things have settled down since then, with recent trading sending the per ton price downwards 22.9% from its high in April, which seems to be due to China’s increased crude steel production and also the government’s stopping speculative trading. They’ve also committed to transportation infrastructure projects, but there is still too much iron ore compared to demand.

18. Copper

As with iron ore, China’s announcement that it would be investing in transportation infrastructure affected the price of copper recently. This is likely a welcome piece of news, as copper had been trading at the lowest levels since March 2009. Output and demand are both projected for small increases this year. Chile has the largest open pit mine and the largest global reserves of copper, but it’s been facing difficulties in recent years including lack of water, which is essential for mining, and local community resistance.

19. Palm oil

Palm oil is a global big business to the tune of $50 billion, which is projected to increase to $88 billion by 2020. It’s in almost everything these days because it’s inexpensive, stable, and can be used for many applications. (It’s not always listed on ingredient labels as palm oil).  Most is produced in Malaysia. It’s also a bête noire of environmentalists – it’s linked to deforestation, the recent massive forest fires in Indonesia which were set, it’s thought, to clear land for plantations, and lost habitat for orangutans and increased worries about their extinction.

20. Aluminum

Aluminum rose overall in 2015, but took a dive in the last few months of the year. Market-watchers are hoping that China’s announcement that it will reduce aluminum output will help energize the market once oversupply is balanced. But one of the world’s biggest producers, Alcoa, is reorganizing, which could be an indication that the company is preparing for an era of depressed prices, despite continued healthy demand.

Digital transformation is affecting different industries at different speeds and on different scales. IDC reveals how in The Internet of Things and Digital Transformation: A Tale of Four Industries.

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How Does Globalization Affect Resources?

Danielle Beurteaux

How do our global and very interconnected markets effect resource volatility?

The evidence points to increasing resource volatility as globalization grows, including in agricultural products. “The globalized world increases the pressure on resources, making even basic food volatile, and especially increasing the pressure on energy and metals,” says Kai Goerlich, SAP’s Idea Director, who led the research.

This research is based on World Bank data and converted into 2010 U.S. dollars for consistency. This is part one of a two-part series.

Top 10 resources and trends

1. Cotton

The top cotton-producing countries are India, China, and the U.S.

The cotton world had a bit of a shock last year when news came out that China was about to unload its massive cotton reserves, which sent prices down. But China didn’t actually flood the cotton market, and cotton production has also decreased somewhat, both of which reversed the price decrease.

The USDA also reports that production levels have recently decreased, particularly in West Africa. Demand from Pakistan increased because its own crop was damaged by pests – good news for India, which increased exports to Pakistan to make up the shortfall.

2. Maize

Maize, aka corn, makes up about a third of global cereal production, according to the World Bank. Maize production has increased over the past 20-odd years, mostly due to its increase as a crop in Asia. The Asian, Canadian, and Australian markets have had an effect on the U.S. Notwithstanding that areas of America’s Midwest are still known as the “breadbasket,” U.S. maize production is actually on a downward trend. It will be interesting to see if the Trans-Pacific Partnership, once (or if) signed will change that development.

3. Platinum

Platinum might be known to consumers mostly for jewelry, but the primary market for this metal is automotive. The majority of platinum comes from South Africa; Russia is the second largest producer. The World Platinum Investment Council is predicting that the metal’s market deficit will decrease this year because of the increased availability of recycled metals and less demand. However, others think the deficit is permanent and predict that platinum will return to its historical price above gold. Much of this depends on demand from global industry, particularly in China.

Here’s an example of the global nature of resources: South African mine workers’ union contracts expire in June. Labor disruptions would, obviously, affect the availability and price of platinum worldwide.

4. Crude oil

It was only recently that the price for crude oil fell yet again due to high inventories, global output, and less demand. What a difference a raging fire can make. The fire in Fort McMurray, Alberta, which began on May 1, has forced the evacuation of the town and the major oil producers have halted or shut down production. This sent crude oil prices back up to almost $50 a barrel, from $26 earlier in the year. Canada is the U.S.’s major supplier of oil.

5. Sawnwood

As with other wood products, there has been an increase in sawnwood production and demand recently, the biggest since the economic downturn post-2008, according to the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization. There has been an increase in production in some European countries, in part because of recent wind storms that knocked down trees. Also, Europe is slowly reforesting, most dramatically in Ireland with a 52% increase in forested lands.

6. Lead

Lead is a valuable ore that is relatively simple to mine and has a high value, with a global market of approximately $15 billion. While production has slowed somewhat, it’s interesting to note that what’s referred to as the “secondary production,” which includes recyclables, is now almost at par with mined lead. In the U.S., most lead production comes from secondary production, and most of it is used for lead-acid batteries. And even though global stocks and production are decreasing, the price per ton is, too. One reason for that is the search and adoption of alternatives that are more environmentally friendly.

7. Sorghum

Sorghum is grain used mostly for livestock feed and ethanol products. The U.S. is the biggest sorghum producer, followed by Mexico and Nigeria.  Its benefits are that it’s relatively drought- and disease-resistant. But that hasn’t stopped the global sorghum market from experiencing a downturn in demand, driven mostly by China for animal feed. China was responsible for almost 80% of U.S. sorghum exports in 2014-2015. But now it looks like China’s government wants to import less and is using up some of its own stockpiles instead.

8. Sugar

A sweet tooth is about to get more expensive. There’s more sugar demand than supply for the first time in five years. This is good news for sugar producers; the price of sugar recently fell to below production cost. Weather conditions, particularly El Niño, have been a problem in decreasing sugar supply. The EU recently surveyed member states’ opinions on raising sugar supplies because the stockpile is heading to dangerous lows, with potential shortages as soon as this summer.

9. Meat and chicken

The world’s appetite for meat continues to grow. Again, China is driving consumption of chicken, sheep, and pigs, and Brazil takes the top slot for beef. Here’s some interesting data from the OECD about global meat consumption: yet again, China’s economic outlook and tastes are shaping global markets. A Chinese company recently purchased Brazil’s largest soybean producer – soybean is used as animal feed. The Australian government recently blocked the sale of a cattle station conglomerate to Dahang Australia, which is mostly controlled by the Shanghai Pengxin Group. The sale was for 2.5% of Australia’s agriculture land and 185,000 cattle.

10. Tea

It’s been a tough year for some tea producers. Assam, the state in India famed for its teas, has been affected by heavy rains and cool temperatures, which will have an negative effect on the “second flush” (second growth) teas. India is the world’s second largest tea producer (China is the largest; Kenya is third), and most of it is grown on Assam’s tea plantations. Heavy rainfalls, dry periods, and pests are all making tea growing a challenge. Tea is actually the second most popular drink worldwide – the first is water. As noted in this U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization report, tea is pretty picky about growing conditions, and there are only a few areas in the world where it grows well. Overall, tea production, exports, and consumption all grew, and the FAO predicts this trend will continue. However, climate change is a top concern of tea producers and could be the biggest challenge to established producing regions.

Industries are realizing the advantages of the Internet of Things and digital transformation at different speeds and on different scales. IDC reveals how in The Internet of Things and Digital Transformation: A Tale of Four Industries.

For more insight on digital transformation, join us at SAPPHIRE NOW and attend the session “Build Resilience into Digital Supply Networks by Using Live Business.”

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How Much Will Digital Cannibalization Eat into Your Business?

Fawn Fitter

Former Cisco CEO John Chambers predicts that 40% of companies will crumble when they fail to complete a successful digital transformation.

These legacy companies may be trying to keep up with insurgent companies that are introducing disruptive technologies, but they’re being held back by the ease of doing business the way they always have – or by how vehemently their customers object to change.

Most organizations today know that they have to embrace innovation. The question is whether they can put a digital business model in place without damaging their existing business so badly that they don’t survive the transition. We gathered a panel of experts to discuss the fine line between disruption and destruction.

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qa_qIn 2011, when Netflix hiked prices and tried to split its streaming and DVD-bymail services, it lost 3.25% of its customer base and 75% of its market capitalization.²︐³ What can we learn from that?

Scott Anthony: That debacle shows that sometimes you can get ahead of your customers. The key is to manage things at the pace of the market, not at your internal speed. You need to know what your customers are looking for and what they’re willing to tolerate. Sometimes companies forget what their customers want and care about, and they try to push things on them before they’re ready.

R. “Ray” Wang: You need to be able to split your traditional business and your growth business so that you can focus on big shifts instead of moving the needle 2%. Netflix was responding to its customers – by deciding not to define its brand too narrowly.

qa_qDoes disruption always involve cannibalizing your own business?

Wang: You can’t design new experiences in existing systems. But you have to make sure you manage the revenue stream on the way down in the old business model while managing the growth of the new one.

Merijn Helle: Traditional brick-and-mortar stores are putting a lot of capital into digital initiatives that aren’t paying enough back yet in the form of online sales, and they’re cannibalizing their profits so they can deliver a single authentic experience. Customers don’t see channels, they see brands; and they want to interact with brands seamlessly in real time, regardless of channel or format.

Lars Bastian: In manufacturing, new technologies aren’t about disrupting your business model as much as they are about expanding it. Think about predictive maintenance, the ability to warn customers when the product they’ve purchased will need service. You’re not going to lose customers by introducing new processes. You have to add these digitized services to remain competitive.

qa_qIs cannibalizing your own business better or worse than losing market share to a more innovative competitor?

Michael Liebhold: You have to create that digital business and mandate it to grow. If you cannibalize the existing business, that’s just the price you have to pay.

Wang: Companies that cannibalize their own businesses are the ones that survive. If you don’t do it, someone else will. What we’re really talking about is “Why do you exist? Why does anyone want to buy from you?”

Anthony: I’m not sure that’s the right question. The fundamental question is what you’re using disruption to do. How do you use it to strengthen what you’re doing today, and what new things does it enable? I think you can get so consumed with all the changes that reconfigure what you’re doing today that you do only that. And if you do only that, your business becomes smaller, less significant, and less interesting.

qa_qSo how should companies think about smart disruption?

Anthony: Leaders have to reconfigure today and imagine tomorrow at the same time. It’s not either/or. Every disruptive threat has an equal, if not greater, opportunity. When disruption strikes, it’s a mistake only to feel the threat to your legacy business. It’s an opportunity to expand into a different marke.

SAP_Disruption_QA_images2400x1600_4Liebhold: It starts at the top. You can’t ask a CEO for an eight-figure budget to upgrade a cloud analytics system if the C-suite doesn’t understand the power of integrating data from across all the legacy systems. So the first task is to educate the senior team so it can approve the budgets.

Scott Underwood: Some of the most interesting questions are internal organizational questions, keeping people from feeling that their livelihoods are in danger or introducing ways to keep them engaged.

Leon Segal: Absolutely. If you want to enter a new market or introduce a new product, there’s a whole chain of stakeholders – including your own employees and the distribution chain. Their experiences are also new. Once you start looking for things that affect their experience, you can’t help doing it. You walk around the office and say, “That doesn’t look right, they don’t look happy. Maybe we should change that around.”

Fawn Fitter is a freelance writer specializing in business and technology. 

To learn more about how to disrupt your business without destroying it, read the in-depth report Digital Disruption: When to Cook the Golden Goose.

Download the PDF (1.2MB)

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3 Ways To Convince Your Workforce To Stop Fearing Digital Transformation

Paul Kurchina

Change of any kind – especially when it’s foisted on you without your commitment – can be dreadful. It may even resemble the return home from a disappointing doctor’s appointment. After shocking the doctor with high numbers across the board, your spouse replaces all of your most-loved foods (the leftover pizza from last night!) and beverages (the after-work beer and soda!) with kale, quinoa, and juice that looks like algae purged by a blender. Immediately, you resist: “How dare my loved one change my diet without my consent! I have no control! Why eat if I can’t be happy with what’s on my plate?”

That’s exactly how most employees view digital transformation initiatives. During the Americas’ SAP User Group (ASUG) webcast “The Only Thing to Fear Is Fear Itself: Embracing Change and Seizing the Opportunity of the Digital Transformation,” Keith R. Sturgill, CIO of Eastman Chemical Company and ASUG Board Chair, said, “in times of transformative change, great opportunities are invaluable. But, it also comes at a great cost because it’s not easy.” Sometimes the process is so daunting that we stop it, ignore it, and resume using our ingrained habits.

While technology-enabled, the real change behind digital transformation is all about people: how they work, collaborate, and make decisions. And changing people is always harder than implementing new technology. But, it’s not impossible once everyone – including leadership, employees, and partners – accepts these three realities of our digital world.

Reality check #1: Digital disruption is not just evolving. It’s already here!

Hearing from customers directly, reacting to what they want, and correcting what they don’t like at hard-to-imagine speeds is raising the bar high for every business. “Connecting people worldwide isn’t just allowing them to self-organize ideas and share opinions; it’s creating a new environment [in which] new business models can emerge. Just ask any growing business,” says Sturgill.

Just think:

  • Amazon is changing the face of retail without a single brick-and-mortar store
  • Airbnb is surpassing traditional hotels and motels without building a physical resort
  • Uber is upending the whole notion of taxi service without a single cab

However, it’s not as easy as setting up a website and creating a network of people, assets, and capital to support it. According to Sturgill, “it’s impossible to know the impact of what’s going to occur [in the future.] We can’t even begin to imagine how this is going to change the world. But without a doubt, it will be huge.”

Reality check #2: Decision making will never – and cannot – be the same

In the past, computers were set up with rules to inject automation and efficiency into business processes. Yet, they failed to support more difficult, complex problem solving such as predictions and forecasting that went beyond the scope of a predefined set of algorithms.

Our digital era is bringing about a new approach to decision making. Not just improving or accelerating decisions, but ultimately changing how they are made. Without the confines of codified decision flows, machine learning will soon consume and process an incredible amount of data to “understand” patterns and correlations. And as more data enters the systems, decisions on complex issues will likely become more improved and accurate.

“Machine learning algorithms will augment human insights, not replace them. Let people do what they do best – create, design, establish relationships and capabilities, and knit together insights to innovate with better judgment and unimaginable ideas,” advises Sturgill. “Think of your business as a decision machine.”

Reality check #3: The user experience (not technology) matters most

Like I said earlier in this blog, digital transformation is not about the technology you implement; it’s about your people. This is why the user experience will always eclipse corporate standards. From your customer to your workforce, consumer-grade technology is increasingly expected to become the norm – and it’s even happening to business-to-business (B2B) companies quicker than anyone realizes.

Most digital transformation strategies place a bright spotlight on the customer experience. By understanding what customers value and their unique preferences, B2B companies are using technology as a differentiator that gives customers a reason to engage and purchase from the business.

However, digital transformation does not end with the customer experience. “It is about people in your organization – talented, empowered, and passionate people. Employees should expect the work environment to be at least as good as their home computing environment. It should be as easy to order a new laptop at work as it is at home,” remarks Sturgill. “You need to commit to improving the work experience of your employees.”

Get your workforce engaged and passionate about digital transformation. Watch the webcast replay The Only Thing to Fear Is Fear Itself: Embracing Change and Seizing the Opportunity of the Digital Transformationin a series hosted by ASUG.

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