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How CIOs Become Invaluable In The Age Of SaaS

Daniel Newman

With SaaS picking up speed, you may have heard whispers about the future of the CIO. Will the role remain necessary? Will it still serve a critical function in the running of a business, especially when you factor in the emergence of “Everything” as a Service (XaaS)?

The answers are yes, yes, and yes. CIOs are still the glue that holds together incumbent business technology, especially if you factor in external influences like Shadow IT, SaaS, and BYOD. What is it precisely that makes CIOs invaluable in this ever-changing environment? Let’s break it down.

Are CIOs on shaky ground?

SaaS and cloud—basically XaaS—surround how we work and how we consume in today’s world. All you have to do is swipe a credit card to use the latest and greatest application. That’s handy for consumers, but what about for those tasked with procuring IT for companies? Making tech purchasing decisions is no longer a highly centralized process; rather, it’s moving into the spokes of organizations. In fact, many are still feeling the sting of that 2012 Gartner prediction that CMOs will spend more on IT than CIOs by the year 2017. If you haven’t heard of that one, I’d be surprised. It’s been highly discussed, and even CIO Magazine has reported on a proposed “CIO-to-CMO transition of power” as the reverberations from Gartner’s report still rattle some industry leaders.

Whether you agree with the Gartner prediction or not, it’s fair to say it’s stirred up a debate about the viability of the CIO in the age of SaaS and XaaS. There just might be a plus side here: Maybe all this back and forth has started what is actually a healthy discussion about the role of CIOs in this evolving tech space. Longevity is possible, though, if CIOs can re-hone their focus on leveraging their skills to developing robust infrastructure to support company scale, securing complex networks and creating a tech environment where company employees can thrive in productivity; hardly an easy task.

Keys to CIO longevity

It is critical that CIOs are masters of the domain of security, compliance, and—perhaps—a new role: education.

Security. We talk a lot about internal and external security, and for good reason. All that Big Data rolling in and out of IT departments can mean big risks for CIOs, so their security efforts must be on-point at all times. Are data scientists getting to the right information quickly and safely? Is proprietary information gated appropriately? What’s the disaster recovery plan for on-premise data center failures? All these questions and more are important to ask, and there’s no room for error.

Compliance. While using a variety of cloud services for day-to-day company operations can bring versatility to overall operations, it can also bring more compliance issues. CIOs can benefit from reinventing their roles to focus on staying ahead of compliance requirements from a big-picture perspective. That way, there will be no aggravating (and costly) downtime due to noncompliance, and everyone in the C-Suite can breathe easily knowing all those compliance boxes remain checked at all times.

Education. With tools and technology changing at breakneck pace, it is nearly impossible for CIOs to keep up with every new tool out there. No matter how big their team, CIO’s can’t validate every application. On top of that, it isn’t exactly in their best interests to become a bottleneck of productivity. Teaching employees about security and compliance risks is a great way to get them to see the difference between innocently downloading the latest consumer-level app, and inadvertently putting company data at risk.

Plus, focusing on inter-company IT education provides job security for CIOs—the tech landscape is evolving into a more do-it-yourself, BYOD space, but there will always be a need for experts to provide guidance, advice, policy, and oversight.

A role revised

If CIOs can lock down internal and external security risks, help the company stay ahead of compliance requirements that can bog down a company, and become a center of excellence for helping employees maximize the adoption of resources, they will put themselves on a much stronger footing. This is especially important in a world where many have tried to provocatively stir the pot, inferring that CIOs are a fleeting trend.

How do you see the role of the CIO evolving as SaaS and “XaaS” continue to dominate boardrooms and budgets? What’s the C-Suite of the future look like for your company? It’s certainly not a black and white issue—there’s lots of gray area and many components to discuss. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

This post was brought to you by IBM Global Technology Services. For more content like this, visit Point B and Beyond 

The post How CIOs Become Invaluable In the Age of SaaS appeared first on Millennial CEO.

Image credit: StockSnap.io

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About Daniel Newman

Daniel Newman serves as the Co-Founder and CEO of EC3, a quickly growing hosted IT and Communication service provider. Prior to this role Daniel has held several prominent leadership roles including serving as CEO of United Visual. Parent company to United Visual Systems, United Visual Productions, and United GlobalComm; a family of companies focused on Visual Communications and Audio Visual Technologies. Daniel is also widely published and active in the Social Media Community. He is the Author of Amazon Best Selling Business Book "The Millennial CEO." Daniel also Co-Founded the Global online Community 12 Most and was recognized by the Huffington Post as one of the 100 Business and Leadership Accounts to Follow on Twitter. Newman is an Adjunct Professor of Management at North Central College. He attained his undergraduate degree in Marketing at Northern Illinois University and an Executive MBA from North Central College in Naperville, IL. Newman currently resides in Aurora, Illinois with his wife (Lisa) and his two daughters (Hailey 9, Avery 5). A Chicago native all of his life, Newman is an avid golfer, a fitness fan, and a classically trained pianist

How To Be Effective With Digital Project Management

Andre Smith

Digital project management requires top-notch organizing skills and managerial abilities. In fact, the most effective digital project managers are actually well-versed in the combined arts of war, technology, and human psychology as well. To make sure that your work and the work of your subordinates come together neatly, you need to be on the ball. You also need to be able to communicate effectively and mentor others as needed. If you want to be an effective leader and a skillful digital project manager, here are a few tips to help you get there.

Set down expectations clearly

There are two parts to this. With one, you need to be able to communicate your expectations to your customers. Your customer is likely to have often unrealistic demands from you. You, as the expert, need to be able to say what can and should be expected, given the resources. The other part to this is being able to communicate your own expectations to your employees.

All parties need to be on the same page for your project to be satisfactory to everyone involved. Leave no room for miscommunication and always be upfront about what can and cannot be delivered. Otherwise, you could end up losing business. Brief your team thoroughly and encourage clarifications. Be there to help and mentor. If your team does not feel free to consult you, you could end up with subpar work.

Communicate regularly and clearly with your team members and your clients. You will be well aware of how projects can evolve and change quickly and unexpectedly. You have to be flexible enough for this, but your client may not always be. Be transparent and clear at all times.

Keep to deadlines

Ideally, you should be able to plan for unexpected delays. Aim to finish ahead of a deadline. Therefore, if something should go wrong, you have a contingency plan to be able to deliver the project on time. A great way to make sure that you and your team keep to deadlines is to break down the project tasks into smaller subtasks. Then give these subtasks their own deadlines. This kind of organization will help prevent delays as well. This is because many of the tasks required from different members of your team will depend on one another’s completion. So a delay with one minor task can have a domino effect and derail the entire project. Follow up on each task with each member of your team. Invest in the best project management software to make this easier.

Know when to ask for help

It may be that you and your team are dealing with a much more complicated problem with organization and management. If this is the case, or if you are just looking for ways to streamline your process and practices, you should hire a management consultant like Global Resources. They can gather data and perform detailed analyses to identify problem areas that might be affecting your work. They will then be able to create unique solutions. This will go a long way towards making your digital project management much more effective and easy to handle.

It will take time for new practices to take root, but it is important to be persistent in order to be highly effective and productive.

Digitalization is not going anywhere, but that doesn’t mean making the transition is without consequences. Learn 4 Ways to Digitally Disrupt Your Business Without Destroying It.

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About Andre Smith

An Internet, Marketing and E-Commerce specialist with several years of experience in the industry. He has watched as the world of online business has grown and adapted to new technologies, and he has made it his mission to help keep businesses informed and up to date.

3D Printed Food: See The Future Of Agriculture Today

Dr. Volker Keiner

“Tea, Earl Grey, hot.”

Any Star Trek fan will recognize this line, when Picard simply speaks his desire and it appears in a replicating machine. But how far is truth from fiction these days? Our world’s technological advancement is moving at an unprecedented rate. Every day, new ideas and collaborations are being turned into innovative new products and services.

Still a relatively new advancement, 3D printing is giving us capabilities we’d never before imagined. The day will come when virtually every store will be supplied by 3D printers. There is significant development for 3D printed food. In Germany, some nursing homes provide Smoothfoods, 3D-printed foods for residents who have problems chewing. Smoothfoods offer more appetizing options by providing the appearance of regular food with the consistency of pureed foods.

We’re already seeing this concept in use, with some fast-food restaurants offering customers the ability to individualize drinks. Instead of the usual eight to ten options, Coca-Cola’s Freestyle machine delivers over 100 different flavor options, from raspberry lemonade and vanilla ginger ale to cherry-vanilla Coke. As our society becomes more focused on personalization, the food we eat is the next target for market disruption, and 3D-printed foods may lead the charge.

The future of food is now

If this sounds like something out of science fiction, remember that it is progressing on a daily basis. 3D printers are being used experimentally for producing pizza, chocolate, pasta, and many more options. NASA is studying the feasibility of using 3D-printed foods for long space flights. This would help with the current short usable timeframe of space-friendly food. It would also provide variety during missions that are expected to exceed five years, such as potential asteroid rerouting and missions to Mars.

Most 3D printing devices are somewhat limited in their creations, but what has developed over the past few years has surprised many in the industry. 3D printers have been responsible for confectioneries beyond the ability of the best chefs. They’ve also brought fresh-brewed coffee to the International Space Station—no small feat in zero-G. But how will these advances change food production?

As the world becomes more connected, here’s a look at a potential scenario dealing with the future of food.

Farming for 21st-century needs

Today’s farmer is an entrepreneur. Rather than playing a passive role in the value chain and dealing only with intermediaries, the farmer can take advantage of hyperconnectivity to market directly to the consumer. A Missouri farmer raising winter wheat, for example, can directly contract with a fine bakery in St. Louis. Being able to connect to recent studies, the farmer knows adding sulfur to the growing crop increases gluten formation.

Precision farming allows the farmer to add just the right amount of fertilizer exactly where it’s needed, or use a drone to drop beneficial insects exactly where they’re needed to control an outbreak of harmful insects without losing organic certification. The final crop is of optimal quality for its exact needs, and costs less to produce due to minimal fertilizer waste and crop losses.

At a local bakery, a customer has remotely uploaded a 3D model to print a customized chocolate figure. As an early adopter of 3D printed food technology, the bakery receives several such orders every day. This one is a model of the Eiffel Tower. The customer has attached a note, explaining that the model is to announce a trip to Paris—an anniversary gift for his wife, who has always dreamed of going to France.

Down the street from the bakery, a nursing home resident isn’t eating enough to stay healthy, as the pureed foods she is served don’t appeal to her. After considering the options, the patient’s case worker decides to switch her diet to a 3D-printed variety that offers better flavor and slight texture.

Browsing the food company’s website, the case worker discovers macaroni and cheese, which her young son has requested for his upcoming birthday party. Recalling how much he enjoys a popular cartoon series, she orders pasta shaped like the cartoon characters for the event. She’s not worried about production or shipping delays, because the pasta will be produced through a 3D printer at a local grocery store within a day and will be ready for pickup shortly after.

She’s glad for the ease of planning the party, because she’s also a busy grad student with little time to grab dinner on her way to class. Fortunately, the university recently added 3D food printing vending machines to the campus. She makes her selection, being sure to choose a high-protein option and to select for a tomato allergy. She gets her food a few minutes later, prepared to her exact specifications.

The right digital strategy allows us to be prepared for market disruptions caused by technology such as 3D printing food. By watching trends in Big Data analysis, we can anticipate these disruptions and plan accordingly. This turns the average agribusiness into a flexible, agile enterprise.

Explore the options available to bring your company into the digital economy for agribusiness.

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Dr. Volker Keiner

About Dr. Volker Keiner

Volker Keiner is a solution manager for commodities in general and for the agribusiness at SAP. As part of the Industry Solutions team for agribusiness and commodity management, he is driving, supporting, and positioning new SAP solutions for commodity trading, commodity logistics, farm to fork, and digital farming. He is working with various customers and partners in these areas.

Customer Experience: OmniChannel. OmniNow. OmniWow.

Jamie Anderson, Volker Hildebrand, Lori Mitchell-Keller, and Stephanie Overby

The lines between the digital and physical customer experience today are largely artificial. Customers shop in retail stores with their devices at the ready. They expect online-like personalization and recommendations in the aisles. They’re looking for instant gratification and better sensory experiences from digital channels. It’s an omnichannel world and companies must figure out how to live in it: delivering a superior customer experience regardless of the entry point.

Luxury fashion brand Rebecca Minkoff, for example, opened its first three retail stores with the intent of taking customers’ best online experiences and bringing them to life. “In the past, you had this brick-and-mortar experience, and you had the online experience,” says company president Uri Minkoff. “There were such great advantages and efficiencies that emerged with shopping online. You could get recommendations, see how something should be styled, create wish lists, access user-generated content. In the store, it was still just you and the product, and maybe a sales associate. But [unlike online] you had all five of your senses.”

Rebecca Minkoff’s new stores still stimulate those senses while incorporating some of the intelligence that online channels typically bring to bear. Each store features a large interactive screen at the entrance, where customers can browse products or order a beverage. Shoppers can interact with salespeople or they can make purchases on a mobile app without ever talking to a soul. Inside a fitting room, RFID-tagged merchandise is displayed on an interactive mirror, where customers can request new sizes or the designer’s recommended coordinates (a real-life recommendation engine).

The company has found that 30% of women ask for additional items based on the recommendations. It has also sold three times more of its new ready-to-wear line than it anticipated. “We were an accessories-dominant brand,” says Minkoff. “But we’ve been able to build this direct relationship with our customers, helping them with outfit completers and also getting a better sense of what they want based on what’s actually happening in our fitting rooms.”

Each piece of technology adds to the experience while capturing the details. Rebecca Minkoff’s integrated systems can remember a customer’s previous visits and preferred colors and sizes, and can enable associates to set up a fitting room with appropriate garments. On the back end, the company gets the kind of visibility into in-store conversions once possible only in digital transactions. “The technology gives us the ability to create the kind of experience each customer wants. She can shop anonymously or be treated like a VIP,” says Minkoff.

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Build Around a Big Idea

Rebecca Minkoff’s approach is a bellwether. It’s not enough simply to provide continuity or consistency from one channel to another. Customers don’t think in terms of channels, and neither should companies. Rather, it’s about defining the overarching experience you want to deliver to customers and then building the appropriate offline and online elements to achieve that intended outcome.

As more goods and even services are commoditized, companies must compete on the experiences they create (see The ROI of Customer Experience). That means coming up with a big idea that drives the design of the customer experience. “Every great experience needs to have a theme,” says Joe Pine, consultant and coauthor of The Experience Economy and Infinite Possibility: Creating Customer Value on the Digital Frontier. “That’s the organizing principle of the experience. It’s how you decide what’s in and what’s out.”

For example, Rebecca Minkoff serves as an image consultant to its Millennial customers, who expect personalization, recognition, and tech innovation, using a mix of online and offline techniques. To stand apart, companies must come up with their own unifying idea and then integrate data and systems, rework organizational models, and rethink key strategic metrics and employee incentives in order to integrate the physical and digital worlds around that idea.

Here are some examples of companies that have created a theme-driven experience using online and offline elements.

Nespresso: Imparting a Sense of Luxury

At the most basic level, Nespresso is a manufacturer of coffee and coffee machines. But the company has successfully turned what it sells and how it sells it into a very specific type of experience. Nespresso strives to impart a feeling of quality, exclusivity, even luxury in a host of ways.

sap_Q316_digital_double_feature3_images2The company has created the Nespresso Club, which maintains direct relationships with thousands of customers. Its customer service centers are staffed by 1,000 highly trained coffee experts who don’t just push products but offer advice and guidance as a sommelier might do with wine. Its 450 retail stores (up from just one Parisian in 2000) are called boutiques; the largely inventory-free showrooms are built around tasting and learning.

Online, the focus is on efficiency and service. Customers who prefer digital interactions can order through the web site or mobile app, which offers the option of courier delivery within a two-hour window. The company also recently introduced a Bluetooth-enabled coffee machine, which when paired with a smartphone app, can track a customer’s usage, simplify machine maintenance, and as Wired pointed out, enable remote brewing.

Success didn’t happen overnight, but today Nespresso is one of Nestlé’s fastest growing and most profitable brands, according to Bloomberg.

QVC: Using Online to Complement the Experience

The theme that has driven television-shopping giant QVC’s customer experience for decades has been “inspiration and entertainment.” Traditionally that was delivered through the joy of spontaneous discovery while watching the channel.

Matching that experience online has been difficult, however. At a digital retail conference in 2015, QVC’s CEO explained that in the past the company had failed to deliver the same rich interactions online that it had developed with its TV audiences, according to Total Retail. So the company decided to rethink its use of digital tools to focus on complementing the experience it delivers through TV screens, according to RetailWire.

For example, after enticing TV viewers with products, QVC introduces the next step in the buying journey—“impulse to buy”—in which viewers are spurred on with televised countdown clocks or limited merchandise availability. Online, the company has been experimenting with second-screen content (for instance, recipes that compliment a cooking product being sold on TV) to further propel purchases. The QVC app features the same item that is on-air along with a prompt that reveals all the items featured on TV in recent hours. On Apple devices equipped with Touch ID, customers can check out in less than 10 seconds with the fingerprint-enabled “speed buy” button. The third phase—“purchase and receive”—is complemented by a simple and reliable online browsing and purchasing platform. The last stage—“own and enjoy”—is accompanied by follow-on e-mail communication with tips on how to use products.

Last year, the company reported that 44% of total QVC sales came from online channels (up from 40% in 2014), and nearly half of those were completed on a mobile device. In fact, QVC is currently the tenth largest mobile commerce retailer in the United States, according to Internet Retailer.

Domino’s: Focusing on Speed and Convenience

sap_Q316_digital_double_feature3_images3Domino’s Pizza built a fast-food empire not necessarily on the quality of its pies but instead on the experience of getting hot food delivered quickly. What started out as a promise to deliver a pizza within 30 minutes to customers who phoned in their order is now a themed experience of efficient food delivery that can be fulfilled a number of ways. Domino’s AnyWare project enables customers to order pizzas from their TV, their Twitter account, their smartwatch, or their connected car, for starters. The Domino’s app features zero-click ordering functionality: Domino’s will start fulfilling the usual order for customers who opt in 10 seconds after opening the app.

Domino’s Australian stores are piloting GPS tracking whereby employees begin working on an order only when the customer enters the “cook zone”—a dynamically updated area around a given store that results in the customer arriving to a just-prepared order. The tool builds upon previously developed GPS-based technology for tracking delivery drivers, according to ZDNet. And the company that came up with the corrugated pizza box and the Heatwave Bag to keep pies warm is now building the DXP—a delivery car with a built-in warming oven. All in the name of the fast- and hot-food delivery experience.

Mohawk Industries: Using Social to Streamline Customer Interactions

Mohawk Industries grew to become a US$8 billion flooring manufacturer by relying on customers to visit its dealers’ retail locations to see, touch, and feel the carpet, hardwood, laminate, or tile they planned to purchase.

sap_Q316_digital_double_feature3_images4Today, instead of waiting for customers to find Mohawk, it has redesigned its experience to find them. It has adopted new technology and reworked its sales processes to reflect that new focus. The company’s 1,200 sales representatives have access to a 360-degree view of each customer, complete with analytics and sales tools on their tablets, enabling them to capture and follow through on leads generated through social media engagement.

By analyzing online discussions in real time, representatives can jump into the conversation and help customers find the product they may be searching for and direct the consumer to a retailer to finish the sale. In one episode, a woman was posting about her interest in a particular leopard rug on Twitter. Mohawk’s team surfaced the tweet, passed it on to a channel partner who contacted the woman and closed the sale within two minutes. Today, the company boasts an 80% close rate on sales started and guided in social media and has made $8 million on 14,000 such social leads. Mohawk Industries expects an increase of $25 million in sales year-over-year, thanks to its new customer-centric approach.

Customer Experience Design: Where to Begin

Developing a unique, valuable, and relevant customer experience that combines the best of offline and online capabilities is a huge undertaking. All corporate functions, including marketing, customer service, sales, operations, finance, and HR as well as product or business lines—all of which typically have competing metrics and agendas—must buy into the experience and collaborate to make it happen. And the ideal mix of digital and physical components will vary by company. But there are some best practices to get companies started on their own journeys.

Start at the Top

Without leadership buy-in, changes will not happen. “Customer experience is not a feature, it’s not a shiny button. It’s a concept that sometimes is tough to grasp. But we believe that if done right, it will keep customers loyal. And so we put a lot of effort into it,” says Kevin Scanlon, director of total customer experience at tech company EMC. “That’s why having that top-down support is paramount. If you don’t have it, you’re spinning your wheels. It’s going to give you the resources, the focus, and the attention that you need to design that consistent experience.”

To demonstrate its commitment, every VP and above at EMC has a customer experience metric as part of their quarterly goal.

Begin with the End in Mind

Companies can take a page from the design-thinking approach to product development, starting with the experience they want customers to have with their company and then putting in place the people, processes, and systems to make that happen across various touchpoints. Uber didn’t start by buying 1,000 cars. It started with a completely new customer experience it wanted to deliver—straddling the digital and physical—and then built the organization around that. Uber ultimately leveraged people, process, and technology to bring that to life, but it started with a unique customer journey.

Design for the Customer, Not the Company

sap_Q316_digital_double_feature3_images5To date, most corporate processes have been designed for internal efficiency or cost savings with little consideration for the impact on the customer. Companies that want to design for consistent experiences have to reexamine those business processes from the customer perspective. In order to deliver a standout and consistent experience, enterprises must bring together an assortment of data from a variety of systems—including POS transactions, mobile purchases, call center activity, notes from sales calls, and social media.

The average retailer has customer data in more than a dozen different systems. But it’s not just the front-end customer-facing systems that need orchestrating; back office systems and processes, from your supply chain to fulfillment to customer service, must be designed to deliver the intended experience. For example, Nespresso has to orchestrate a number of back-end and front-end systems to offer customers premium courier delivery within two-hour windows.

Put Someone in Charge

Companies that are truly invested in creating integrated, standout customer experiences often create a centralized function that can bring together the people, processes, and technology to bring them to life. Sometimes there is a chief customer officer or head of customer experience. But unless these people are really empowered, they’re toothless.

EMC’s Scanlon is empowered. He heads up a function that has been transformed from focusing on product quality into a centralized customer experience center of excellence staffed with 60 full-time professionals. The center has translated into “more focus, more energy, more insight to our customers,” says Scanlon. “And we can deliver that insight to our internal stakeholders, which trickles down to our account teams and lets them have more meaningful conversations that benefit our customers—and benefit the company over time.”

Centralize Customer Data

Even if there is no central customer experience function, there needs to be a central data repository and analytics system: a digital foundation that everyone can use to improve their piece of that experience. EMC’s customer experience group has a data governance function that maintains a single source of customer truth. “They’re able to pull all relevant data sources into one location and get past the typical customer data challenges,” says Scanlon.

Invest in People

Companies that care about the customer experience invest in the people who deliver it. Human beings are the clearest signposts on the customer journey. Companies must hire the best, train for desired outcomes, and reward based on experience metrics: for being brand ambassadors and for going above and beyond on behalf of the customer.

sap_Q316_digital_double_feature3_images6Rethink Metrics and Incentives

One major bank was having trouble driving adoption of its online banking tools. The customers that used the tools loved them, but the tools weren’t getting traction. The problem? The branch managers had no interest in promoting digital banking. They wanted to drive as much traffic as possible to their physical branches because this was one of their key performance metrics.

The solution was to change the compensation approach in order to reward employees for the entire customer experience, including online banking adoption. Branch managers were measured on online and offline customer behavior in their regions. That became a single and critical KPI, and it boosted the desired behaviors and improved overall customer satisfaction.

Create a Single View of the Company

For years, companies have talked about the importance of understanding the customer. And that remains true, particularly when it comes to delivering a valuable customer experience online and off. But successful customer experience design is just as much about giving customers a clear understanding of the company through coordinated experiences that deliver on the brand’s theme and bring it to life in various ways in bricks and mortar, through devices, in online interactions, and everywhere in between. D!

Read more thought provoking articles in the latest issue of the Digitalist Magazine, Executive Quarterly.

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New Leaders: The Rise Of Millennials In Leadership Roles [INFOGRAPHIC]

Switch & Shift

Millennials have been entering the workforce in droves over the past decade. They have been gaining experience, learning to succeed, and rising steadily through the corporate ranks. Every day for the next 19 years, 10,000 baby boomers will reach retirement age, leaving opportunities for new leaders to take the reins of the global economy. Many of those new leaders will be millennials.

It’s an exciting time for the business community as millennials bring new perspectives and changing priorities to leadership roles. New methodologies, innovative practices, and cultural change are poised to remake the landscape of modern business.

Are you ready?

What skills do millennial leaders value and what experience do they need? Review the infographic below to determine what characteristics the new leader will need as industries shift and new talent rises to the top.

 

new leaders

Will your workplace be prepared for a new generation of leaders? See Global Study: Barely 16% Of Companies Ready For Digital Leadership.

This post appeared in Switch&Shift and was brought to you courtesy of The College of Professional and Continuing Studies at The University of Denver.

 

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