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2016 Brings Three Opportunities To Rethink Resource Optimization

Shelly Dutton

Digital. Disruptive. Deep in data. 2015 certainly kept many executives awake at night. In one short year, we witnessed the arrival of new businesses that own nothing and earn millions. Another crop of iconic brands disappeared, succumbing to the effects of mergers and acquisitions or the competitive muscle and creativity of digital darlings. And as the need for natural resources escalates, climate change and drought conditions continue to widen the gap between supply and demand.

No business can afford to continue down this path. In fact, a study from the John M. Olin School of Business at Washington University estimates that 40% of today’s FORTUNE 500 companies on the S&P 500 will no longer exist in less than 10 years.

What’s needed is a meaningful focus on resource optimization – and 2016 may be the year to do just that.

New trends that will change your resource optimization strategies 

According to the recent report IDC FutureScape: Worldwide Digital Transformation 2016 Predictions, IDC foresees three trends that may change how businesses look at their resource optimization strategies:

  1. 22 billion Internet of Things (IoT) devices installed by 2018, driving the development of over 200,000 new IoT apps and services.
  1. More than 50% of developer teams will embed cognitive services in their apps (vs. one percent today), saving U.S. enterprises over $60 billion annually by 2020.
  1. Over 50% of enterprises will create and/or partner with industry cloud platforms to distribute their innovations and source others’.

When I read these predictions, three things came to mind: continuous intelligence, continuous innovation, and continuous optimization. By linking digital technology to analytics-driven decision making in every area of the business, companies have an opportunity to evolve and better understand and serve their customers.

Why wait and see whether IDC’s predictions hold true? Take a look at five areas that you can impact now with digital technology.

  1. Asset management: Fixed assets can take up as much as one-third of all operating costs. As the use of IoT sensors and devices continues to grow, continuous monitoring will become the norm. As a result, companies can adjust the routing of its fleet and logistics process, drive down production downtime, and forecast production and operational demand more accurately. Once the data generated from these devices is shared across the entire business network, companies can help their external partners, suppliers, and other third-parties create a relationship that value continuous performance improvement and innovation.
  1. Teamwork and collaboration: Through digital intelligence, machine automation, and robotics, workers can expand their ability to increase efficiency and make real-time decisions that can directly impact business outcomes.
  1. Customer experience: There’s no debate that the proliferation of the digital channel is radically changing how companies engage with customers. Brands can directly impact the entire customer experience; from the first Google search to product and service delivery, businesses can transform passive customers into loyal advocates.
  1. User adoption: The beauty of Big Data is that there is no longer an excuse for creating goods and services that customers do not want. The rise of social media and lowering inhibitions in providing personal information are empowering businesses to improve offerings and innovate in step with customer needs and wants. By using this digital intelligence, brands can proactively impact the mass-market appeal adoption of their products and services.
  1. Environmental impact: Customers are more conscious about the environmental effects of the goods and services they use. More important, brand perception is directly tied to this criteria. In his blog “The Meaning – And Opportunity – Behind the Internet of Things,” Kai Goerlich states, “As decision makers receive information from direct and indirect environments, they can scan for precise navigation, logistics, weather prediction, agricultural planning, and pollution management, for example. By combining this streaming information with existing data, companies can create new insights and develop new products and services.”

As the next chapter of the digital economy unfolds this year, the business world finds itself at an inflection point. Some will rapidly scale their digital transformation to thrive in this new world. Others will operate “business as usual” and hope for the best. Which way will your business go?

For more thoughts on the impact of digital transformation, check out Kai Goerlich’s blog “The Meaning – And Opportunity – Behind the Internet of Things.”

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How IoT Is Poised To Change Retail

Megan Ray Nichols

The Internet of Things (IoT) has been causing quite a stir, and now it seems poised to cause a positive disruption in the world of retail. Here are some specific ways IoT-related technologies may be utilized to boost both in-store and online retail transactions.

Smoother, more connected experiences for in-store consumers

Analysts predict the Internet of Things will revolutionize the ways we shop at our favorite stores. Some technological advancements likely to soon become mainstream include intelligent barcodes customers can scan to get more details about products, in-store advertising that works via facial recognition and can give personalized insights, and the ability for shoppers to sign up for text messages that offer special deals on products as they move around stores.

The overarching goal of all these high-tech hopes is to create fun, exciting shopping experiences that integrate numerous promotional tactics. IoT can also help store employees learn up-to-the-minute details about shelf inventory and make real-time price updates, eliminating the need for workers to manually apply new price tags.

IoT-enabled robots could streamline supply chains and emphasize safety

It’s also expected that before long, robots that are linked to the Internet of Things could shorten the distance between warehouses and store shelves. Lowe’s, the home improvement retailer, has already begun experimenting with a robot to help customers learn whether desired items are in stock.

The IoT-connected technology, nicknamed the LoweBot, can scan items and capture real-time inventory about product availability. It’s easy to see how such technology could make the customer experience more efficient by promoting better connectivity between the stockroom and the sales floor.

Robots linked to the Internet of Things could also theoretically take on some of the characteristically unsafe conditions many warehouse workers must endure, such as temperature extremes and risks from use of heavy equipment. Common occupational hazards for employees include carpal tunnel syndrome and back pain.

In the near future, we may see a shift away from humans handling repetitive and potentially dangerous warehouse duties as IoT robots fill the void. Considering the massive scale of some online retailers’ distribution centers, it’s easy to see how warehouse robotics could have a positive impact in this area as well as in sales at both brick-and-mortar and online stores.

Major brands clearly see how the IoT could reshape retail

Clearly, the IoT is set to dramatically change how we shop for the things we love, regardless of whether we buy them on websites or in traditional stores. If the examples cited above make you feel excited about future possibilities, you’re not alone.

Intel is an example of a major brand that’s pledged to make investments into IoT-related retail ventures. Over the next five years, the company will invest more than $100 million into IoT retail technologies. Already, Intel has unveiled an IoT platform called the Intel Responsive Retail Platform, which will help employees figure out the best placement for different products, help them track sales, monitor inventory levels, and more.

Target is reportedly ready to reopen the Target Open Store, a concept house in San Francisco where customers can interact with IoT devices to explore how they could improve their lives prior to purchasing them.

The Open Store also includes “The Garage,” a section that features IoT products still in development, leading customers to wonder more about what’s in store for the IoT. In total, the Open Store can display up to 70 items simultaneously.

Theorizing about what’s ahead

Only time will tell what’s to come in the months and years ahead, but if headlines are any indication, we can look forward to an enhanced shopping experience that gives employees more flexibility to meet customers’ needs via high-tech platforms that manage formerly human-driven tasks like inventory management and price changes.

It’s also likely we’ll be less dependent on employees to provide details such as whether clothing in a certain color is in stock, or if a nearby store has the specific product we want. As for the giant warehouses that are a necessity for most large online retailers, expect robots to commonly assume some of the tasks that could be dangerous for humans to do.

One thing’s for certain: Thanks to the Internet of Things, the retail industry has already changed in major ways, with more still to come.

For more insight on digital transformation in the retail industry, see SMB Retailers’ Digital Strategy Is All About The Shopper.

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About Megan Ray Nichols

Megan Ray Nichols is a freelance science writer and the editor of "Schooled By Science." She enjoys researching the latest advances in technology and writes regularly for Datafloq, Colocation American, and Vision Times. You can follow Megan on Twitter.

How Utilities Can Bring About Smarter Cities

Gavin Mooney

Smart cities promise to improve our lives, whether through better health monitoring, smarter buildings, improved outdoor spaces, or reduced traffic congestion.

This is important because the 21st century is going to be the century of cities. By 2050, two-thirds of the world will live in a city.

Cities offer more choices, better education, a greater diversity of people and interests, and better employment opportunities. A 2011 McKinsey study revealed that the world’s top 600 cities accounted for a staggering 60% of global GDP. So it makes sense for people to move to cities to make the most of these opportunities.

But as urban populations swell, it places an increasing strain on the city’s infrastructure.

Traffic congestion is becoming the biggest challenge for modern cities. In the world’s most congested cities – Mexico City, Bangkok, and Istanbul – traffic adds more than 50% to journey times during peak hours. The congestion makes people late for work and stresses them out before they arrive. It makes deliveries late, disrupting supply chains, and it wastes fuel. In Los Angeles it’s estimated that each resident loses $6,000 a year in traffic, mostly due to lost time that could be better spent elsewhere and increased fuel consumption.

Cars stuck in stop-start congestion emit far more pollutants than usual, including carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, and particulate matter. In many areas, vehicle emissions have become the dominant source of air pollutants. Outdoor air pollution kills 3.3 million people every year, more than HIV, malaria, and influenza combined.

And what about finding a parking spot? More inner city traffic only makes it harder to find one, and up to 30% of the cars crawling around the city centre are actually looking for a parking spot.

That’s why we need smarter cities

In Karlsruhe, Germany, the city is addressing all these issues and more with smart streetlights. The utilities industry is being disrupted, and utilities need to find new business models to adapt to this volatile market environment. Local utility EnBW is doing just that. Partnering with SAP, they are running a pilot project in the city called Sm!ght – smart, city, light.

Streetlights have enormous potential. As Matthias Weis, Sm!ght project lead, explains:

Streetlights are part of the infrastructure in almost every street in almost every city in the world, and they’re laid out in a regular, structured grid. Therefore, streetlights are an ideal medium to add additional technological features to.

The Sm!ght streetlamps include free public WiFi, an emergency button, and environmental sensors that can measure things such as particulate matter concentrations. To tackle inner city pollution, Sm!ght helps drive electric vehicle (EV) adoption by offering an EV charging point in every lamppost, combating the “range anxiety” that concerns many potential buyers.

Radar sensors monitor the amount of traffic passing and also whether the charging point is available. This IoT data is distributed in real time with the HANA Cloud Platform to enable decisions to be taken on the spot, such as diverting traffic or guiding cars to a free parking spot. Smart parking offers a number of benefits to a city including increased revenue as well as reduced traffic.

As Frank Mentrup, Mayor of Karlsruhe says:

We want to be a modern, innovative city and we want to promote what has been developed here…the Sm!ght lamps are a prime example because here, IT, energy and mobility merge.

Karlsruhe is setting the example by using technology to enable an infrastructure tailored to the needs of the city of tomorrow.

To see more ways technology can make cities smarter, check this out.

Comments

Gavin Mooney

About Gavin Mooney

Gavin Mooney is a utilities industry solution specialist for SAP. From a background in Engineering and IT, Gavin has been working in the utilities industry with SAP products for nearly 15 years. He has had the privilege of working with a number of Electricity, Gas and Water Utilities across the globe to implement SAP’s Industry Solution for Utilities. He now works with utilities to help them identify the best way to run simple and run better with SAP's latest products. Gavin loves to network and build lasting business relationships and is passionate about cleantech and the fundamental transformation currently shaking up the utilities industry.

Is Personalization Killing Your Relationships With Customers?

Christopher Koch

 

Customers Want Personalization…

 

Customers expect a coordinated, personalized response across all channels. For example, 91% expect to pick up where they left off when they switch channels.

Source: “Omni-Channel Service Doesn’t Measure Up; Customers Are Tired of Playing Games” (Aspect Blog, January 29, 2014)

laptop_phone

 


 

… And they Want it Now

 

Customers also want their interactions to be live – or in the moment they choose. For example, nearly 60% of consumers want real-time promotions and 48% like online reminders to order items that they might have run out of.

realtime

That means companies need to become a Live Business – a business that can coordinate multiple functions in order to respond to and even anticipate customer demand at any moment.

Source: “U.S. Consumers Want More Personalized Retail Experience and Control Over Personal Information, Accenture Survey Shows” (Accenture, March 9, 2015)

 


 

But There’s a Catch: Trust

 

73percent

Customers are demanding more intimacy, but there’s only so far companies can go before they cross over the line to creepy. For example, facial-recognition technology that identifies age and gender to target advertisements on digital screens is considered creepy by 73% of people surveyed.

Source: “In-Store Personalization: Creepy or Cool?” (RichRelevance, 2015)

 


 

How to Earn Their Trust and Keep It

 

Here are some ways to improve trust while moving forward with omnichannel personalization.

trustfall

1-01

Customers Want Value for Their Data

An Accenture study found that the majority of consumers in the United States and the United Kingdom are willing to allow trusted retailers to use some of their personal data in order to present personalized and targeted products, services, recommendations, and offers.

Source: “U.S. Consumers Want More Personalized Retail Experience and Control Over Personal Information, Accenture Survey Shows” (Accenture, March 9, 2015)

 

2-01

Don’t Take Data, Let Customers Offer It

Customers who voluntarily provide data are less likely to be annoyed by personalization that’s built around it. Mobile apps are a great way to invite customers to share more data in a relationship that they control.

 

3-01

Be Clear About How You Will Use Data

Companies should think about the customer data transaction – such as what information the customer is giving them, how it’s being used, and what the result will be – and describe it as simply as possible.

 


 

download arrowTo learn more about how to personalize without destroying trust, read the in-depth report Live Businesses Deliver a Personal Customer Experience Without Losing Trust.

 

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About Christopher Koch

Christopher Koch is the Editorial Director of the SAP Center for Business Insight. He is an experienced publishing professional, researcher, editor, and writer in business, technology, and B2B marketing. Share your thoughts with Chris on Twitter @Ckochster.

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Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Stephan Gatien

About Stephan Gatien

Stephan Gatien is global head of Telecommunications for SAP. He is responsible for the company's vision and strategy in the telecommunications industry, overseeing product and solution management activities and working with product development teams to ensure that SAP products support the unique needs of telcos.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

About Andre Smith

An Internet, Marketing and E-Commerce specialist with several years of experience in the industry. He has watched as the world of online business has grown and adapted to new technologies, and he has made it his mission to help keep businesses informed and up to date.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

About Mike Jones

Mike Jones is an expert writer dedicated to learn as much as he can about the business world while keeping focus on his main interest: natural healthcare remedies. He shares his conclusions and work here as often as he can.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

About Michael Brenner

Michael Brenner is a globally-recognized keynote speaker, author of  The Content Formula and the CEO of Marketing Insider GroupHe has worked in leadership positions in sales and marketing for global brands like SAP and Nielsen, as well as for thriving startups. Today, Michael shares his passion on leadership and marketing strategies that deliver customer value and business impact. He is recognized by the Huffington Post as a Top Business Keynote Speaker and   a top  CMO influencer by Forbes.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

About Adam Winfield

Adam Winfield writes about technology, how it's affecting industries, how it's affecting businesses, and how it's affecting people.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

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awareness