Sections

To Cloud Or Not To Cloud: That Is The Compliance Question

Daniel Newman

Some companies have embraced cloud technology with open arms, while others approach it with extreme wariness—understandably so, since for industries that handle sensitive data, cloud security risks could spell disaster. However, fear of the cloud often comes from a lack of information rather than actual risk.

Companies today have the opportunity to use public, private, and hybrid cloud options, yet many technology leaders continue to vacillate in their cloud approach. Some still favor legacy solutions, even though they run slower and cost more. Others only use public or private cloud solutions minimally, and haven’t yet explored the possibility of hybrid solutions.

The possibilities of hybrid cloud

A hybrid cloud setup offers companies the greatest flexibility yet. If you have sensitive data, you can still use traditional networking for data storage while running some enterprise applications through a public or private cloud. The solution allows companies to set up a customized cloud structure that makes sense on every level.

The risk versus the reward  

Companies that look at the full threat landscape understand the potential risk of cloud solutions. While it will always carry a certain level of risk, lost devices, human error, and other types of breaches often represent a higher risk of vulnerability than a cloud solution. Furthermore, third-party companies often run private, public, and hybrid cloud solutions. Your security is in a vendor’s best interest. Without strong security protocols and continual updates, they could lose clients and their reputation in the industry.

All organizations in every industry are moving to the cloud. They may not house everything there, but they use it to some extent. Companies that fail to explore the possibilities today may not keep up with the changing digital needs of their target markets down the road. 2016 is the right time to explore a cloud migration.

Compliance and security: Hybrid cloud in tough verticals

Some industries must consider regulatory requirements before moving their enterprise applications and data into a cloud solution. Healthcare, government, and the finance industry all represent fields with data sensitivity concerns. Luckily, many vendors and a government program called FedRAMP now offer highly secure and customizable hybrid cloud solutions so certain industries can maintain compliance while continuing to transition to the cloud.

FedRAMP, healthcare, and government agencies. FedRAMP (Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program) is a program that standardizes security for cloud solutions. Companies that offer authorized FedRAMP security with their cloud solutions meet the security requirements sensitive industries can use to safely move their data and solutions into the cloud. Amazon, Windows, and IBM all offer FedRAMP cloud solutions for government agencies and other organizations.

The finance sector. Major banks, lenders, and other financial institutions—all heavily regulated—have discovered that the benefits of cloud migration outweighs the risks. They can work faster with less downtime and more comprehensive data management in the cloud, than in any traditional solutions provided. Plus, moving to the cloud is incredibly cost-effective. Hybrid solutions benefit internal operations, but more importantly, they benefit the customer.

Choosing a hybrid cloud provider 

Hybrid cloud solutions are scalable, so companies can use them on a small scale before they roll out a comprehensive solution at the enterprise level. Companies that still harbor reservations may find this type of approach more digestible. If you’re interested in seeing what the hybrid cloud can do for you, learn more about your compliance requirements. A cloud vendor that readily understands the regulatory constraints you face will know how to recommend a hybrid solution that allows you to create a secure solution.

When you adopt cloud solutions, they will offer more flexibility, faster transmission speeds, and enhanced productivity. Look for solutions that can support your needs today, as well as projects for the future of your industry. Explore how moving to the cloud will change device policies, IoT acceptance, and remote worker capabilities. A hybrid cloud investment will not only benefit your company today, it will also drive progress tomorrow.

 

This post was brought to you by IBM Global Technology Services. For more content like this, visit Point B and Beyond 

Photo Credit: iebschool via Compfight cc

The post To Cloud or Not to Cloud: That is the Compliance Question appeared first on Millennial CEO.

Comments

About Daniel Newman

Daniel Newman serves as the Co-Founder and CEO of EC3, a quickly growing hosted IT and Communication service provider. Prior to this role Daniel has held several prominent leadership roles including serving as CEO of United Visual. Parent company to United Visual Systems, United Visual Productions, and United GlobalComm; a family of companies focused on Visual Communications and Audio Visual Technologies. Daniel is also widely published and active in the Social Media Community. He is the Author of Amazon Best Selling Business Book "The Millennial CEO." Daniel also Co-Founded the Global online Community 12 Most and was recognized by the Huffington Post as one of the 100 Business and Leadership Accounts to Follow on Twitter. Newman is an Adjunct Professor of Management at North Central College. He attained his undergraduate degree in Marketing at Northern Illinois University and an Executive MBA from North Central College in Naperville, IL. Newman currently resides in Aurora, Illinois with his wife (Lisa) and his two daughters (Hailey 9, Avery 5). A Chicago native all of his life, Newman is an avid golfer, a fitness fan, and a classically trained pianist

The Epic Challenge Of Food Security

Joerg Koesters

Food security has always been important, but as the world population grows and climate change and other factors make food sources unstable, it’s becoming more critical than ever.

Executive director of the Alliance to End Hunger Rebecca Middleton; senior program officer of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Christian Merz; executive director of CARI/GIZ Dr. Stefan Kachelriess-Matthess; and moderator Tanja Reith, director & global lead of agribusiness for SAP, recently came together at the Future of Food Forum to discuss how to reduce hunger and improve food security globally.

Does the world have food security?

The discussion began with the assessment that food insecurity is “closer to all of us than we think.” Tanja Reith explained that the World Food Summit’s definition of food security includes all people being able to get enough safe, healthy food at all times to meet their nutritional needs and match their personal preferences.

Unfortunately, food security does not yet exist for everyone. Reith offered many examples of food insecurity around the world, mostly in developing countries. Hunger remains a serious problem in Asia, especially Southern Asia, and in sub-Saharan Africa. According to Reith, one in nine people in the world are undernourished today.

Improving food security

How can we reduce hunger globally? Asked which pillar is most pressing of the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization’s four pillars of food security—availability, access, utilization, and stability—Dr. Stefan Kachelriess-Matthess explained that the four pillars are dependent on each other, making this a particularly complex issue.

While increasing food security is a monumental task, the experts offered several examples of how it can be addressed. For example, Rebecca Middleton described how improving crop diversity can create more resilient farms, increase security even in the face of weather changes, and provide a better selection of food, offering enhanced nutrition for a longer period of time.

Christian Merz added that necessary systemic change can take place in different systems, such as rule advisory and extension services to share knowledge of agricultural practices. He also noted that innovative solutions to food supplies could help reduce poverty—for example, a company could create more drought-tolerant crops, and vary fertilizer blends.

Are there ways that non-farming industry companies can influence food security? The role of technology was an important part of the discussion. Reith noted, “Technology is already being used today to successfully address the food security epidemic.”

Merz agreed. “We certainly believe that digital solutions and technologies are playing an increasingly important role to drive agricultural transformation that is inclusive, putting the small farmer into the driver seat of economic growth in that sector.” He cited the African Soil Information Service, which uses technology to provide detailed soil information, which businesses can use to develop fertilizers for specific needs.

Another example is technology that tracks facilities, replacing error-prone paper-based systems with more efficient electronic ones. Merz explained that people are now able to use smartphones for farmer registration, tracking buying quality and other information.

Learn more about the changing food industry and innovations that are helping address food security by listening to the full replay of this food security session: SAP Future of Food Forum.

Comments

About Joerg Koesters

Joerg Koesters is the Head of Retail Marketing and Communication at SAP. He is a Technology Marketing executive with 20 years of experience in Marketing, Sales and Consulting, Joerg has deep knowledge in retail and consumer products having worked both in the industry and in the technology sector.

Using Data Science For Predictive Maintenance

Sandeep Raut

A few years ago, there were two recall announcements from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, warning of problems that could cause fires in two auto brands. For both automakers, these defect required significant money and time to resolve.

Manufacturers in the aerospace, rail, equipment, and automotive industries face the challenge of ensuring maximum availability of critical assembly line systems and keeping those assets in good working order, while simultaneously minimizing the cost of maintenance and time-based or count-based repairs. Identifying root causes of faults and failures must also happen without labs or testing. As more vehicles, industrial equipment, and assembly robots communicate their status to a central server, detection of faults becomes easier and more practical.

Identifying potential issues early helps organizations deploy maintenance teams more cost-effectively and maximizes parts and equipment uptime. All the critical factors that help predict failure may be deeply buried in structured data (including equipment year, make, model, and warranty details) and unstructured data comprising millions of log entries that include sensor data, error messages, odometer readings, speeds, engine temperatures, engine torque and acceleration records, and repair and maintenance reports.

Predictive maintenance, a technique for predicting when an in-service machine will fail so that maintenance can be planned in advance, encompasses failure prediction, failure diagnosis, failure type classification, and recommendation of maintenance actions after failure. For example, TrenItalia has invested 50 million euros in an Internet of Things project to cut maintenance costs by up to 130 million euros and increase train availability and customer satisfaction.

The benefits of using data science with predictive maintenance include:

  • Minimized maintenance costs. Don’t waste money through over-cautious, time-bound maintenance. Repair equipment only when repairs are actually needed.
  • Reduced unplanned downtime. Implement predictive maintenance to predict future equipment malfunctions and failures, and minimize the risk for unplanned disasters that could put your business at risk.
  • Root-cause analysis. Find causes for equipment malfunctions and work with suppliers to switch off reasons for high failure rates. Increase return on your assets.
  • Efficient labor planning. Stop wasting time replacing and fixing equipment that doesn’t need it.
  • Avoidance of warranty cost to recover failure. Minimize recalls and assembly-line production loss.

Sudden machine failures can result in contract penalties and lost revenue, and can even ruin the reputation of a business. Data science can help avoid problems in real time and before they happen.

For more on how predictive analytics can improve business efficiency, see Using Algorithms To Add Science To Human Judgement In HR.

This article originally appeared in Simplified Analytics.

 

Comments

3 Ways Robots Will Co-Evolve with Humans

Christopher Koch

Comments

About Christopher Koch

Christopher Koch is the Editorial Director of the SAP Center for Business Insight. He is an experienced publishing professional, researcher, editor, and writer in business, technology, and B2B marketing. Share your thoughts with Chris on Twitter @Ckochster.

Tags:

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

About Andre Smith

An Internet, Marketing and E-Commerce specialist with several years of experience in the industry. He has watched as the world of online business has grown and adapted to new technologies, and he has made it his mission to help keep businesses informed and up to date.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

About Neil Patrick

Neil Patrick is director of the GRC Center of Excellence in EMEA for SAP.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Ioana Sima

About Ioana Sima

Ioana Sima is an architecture student at Ion Mincu University of Architecture, CMO of DigitalWebProperties, coffee lover, and avid gamer. Despite my academic background, I decided to pursue a career in digital marketing. Why? Because it's thrilling, fascinating, and unpredictable. My goal is to contribute to the creation of something truly meaningful & to grow professionally. Follow me on Twitter if you enjoy gaming, dank memes, and digital marketing.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Bruce McCuaig

About Bruce McCuaig

Bruce McCuaig is director - Product Marketing at SAP GRC solutions. He is responsible for development and execution of the product marketing strategy for SAP Risk Management, SAP Audit Management and SAP solutions for three lines of defense. Bruce has extensive experience in industry as a finance professional, as a chief risk officer, and as a chief audit executive. He has written and spoken extensively on GRC topics and has worked with clients around the world implementing GRC solutions and technology.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

About Richard Howells

Richard Howells is a Vice President at SAP responsible for the positioning, messaging, AR , PR and go-to market activities for the SAP Supply Chain solutions.

Tags:

awareness