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90% Of Businesses To Utilize The Private Cloud Network In The Next Decade

Andre Smith

Public clouds (e.g., Google Cloud, Amazon Cloud Drive) are financially efficient, easy to manage, pay-as-you-go cloud services available to all members of the public, either for free or for a small monthly cost. The public cloud has given individuals and businesses, big and small, resources for storing and sharing data.

PMC Telecom, trading since 1991, has noticed considerable demand for cloud-based services. Luke Cropper, head of hosted, says PMC Telecom’s customers have always required phone systems; but they are no longer happy with simple plug-and-play handsets. They want services available only through cloud-based services, such as the freedom to use any device to answer a call. New technology such as hosted VoIP enables customers to advance their telecom solutions in a way that traditional systems cannot rival.

The public cloud has paved the way for the future of telecommunications and data technology and has the benefit of being available to multiple businesses and members of the public, but it’s limited by being a one-size-fits-all model. As the cloud-based technology hype dies down and it is no longer seen as an exciting, innovative novelty, businesses are beginning to request more to suit the needs of their specific company.

The private cloud – much like the public cloud – offers numerous benefits, including scalability, flexibility, and security, with the added bonus of being solely dedicated to one specific company or business. This means that companies can take full advantage of a tailor-made cloud service.

Businesses can gain by utilizing the private cloud network through faster ROI, offsite backup, complete mobility, and higher data security.

A global survey conducted by cloud solutions provider QualiSystems revealed that 30% of workplace cloud data usage is managed through private cloud systems, with a further 10% predicted to switch from public to private in the next year.

The initial cost of using a private cloud network is higher than that of its public counterpart. However companies can save up to 50% on long-term costs by opting to go private, with operating expenses often significantly lower than public cloud costs (as seen in this case study in the International Journal of Computer Science & Information Technology).

The capital expenditure on switching to a private cloud service is high compared to the initial switch to public cloud, which is often free of charge. However, as the case study above shows, the operating expenses of a private cloud network over a three-year period are nearly a quarter of the costs of public cloud operating expenses, bringing the three-year total cost of using the private cloud to almost half of the cost of using the public cloud.

Cost is a huge influence when it comes to decision making for big businesses, however the leading drawback of using a public cloud service is the security risk potential that comes with a shared environment. Logically, a private network is far more security efficient that a shared public one. Therefore, more big businesses with sensitive data are making the switch to private in order to tighten security of their data.

The requirements of the ever-growing development and operations field are becoming greater all the time, with cloud providers struggling to keep up. The QualiSystems survey revealed that cloud service providers don’t have the ability to meet the demand of IaaS (infrastructure as a service) within an efficient timescale.

Seventy-five percent of those questioned fail to deliver IaaS within the same day that it is required; with the majority of companies needing almost a week to meet the requirements of their users.

Over 90% of businesses now use a type of cloud-based service for their company needs, an impressive statistic considering that the cloud only really became popular in 2002 thanks to Amazon Web Services and furthered by Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud in 2006. Its popularity is unsurprising since the technology comes with so many benefits that companies would be foolish not to adapt their systems to maximize business potential. The private cloud is simply the new wave of technology that is heavily weighted with numerous benefits.

From this, its predictable that (just like with the first generation of cloud-based services), 90% of businesses will be utilizing a private cloud network in the next decade.

IoT and Industry 4.0 may have more impact on the future of your business than anything else on earth. Learn what the experts this means for business in Myth-Busting: The Networked Economy.

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About Andre Smith

An Internet, Marketing and E-Commerce specialist with several years of experience in the industry. He has watched as the world of online business has grown and adapted to new technologies, and he has made it his mission to help keep businesses informed and up to date.

The Epic Challenge Of Food Security

Joerg Koesters

Food security has always been important, but as the world population grows and climate change and other factors make food sources unstable, it’s becoming more critical than ever.

Executive director of the Alliance to End Hunger Rebecca Middleton; senior program officer of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Christian Merz; executive director of CARI/GIZ Dr. Stefan Kachelriess-Matthess; and moderator Tanja Reith, director & global lead of agribusiness for SAP, recently came together at the Future of Food Forum to discuss how to reduce hunger and improve food security globally.

Does the world have food security?

The discussion began with the assessment that food insecurity is “closer to all of us than we think.” Tanja Reith explained that the World Food Summit’s definition of food security includes all people being able to get enough safe, healthy food at all times to meet their nutritional needs and match their personal preferences.

Unfortunately, food security does not yet exist for everyone. Reith offered many examples of food insecurity around the world, mostly in developing countries. Hunger remains a serious problem in Asia, especially Southern Asia, and in sub-Saharan Africa. According to Reith, one in nine people in the world are undernourished today.

Improving food security

How can we reduce hunger globally? Asked which pillar is most pressing of the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization’s four pillars of food security—availability, access, utilization, and stability—Dr. Stefan Kachelriess-Matthess explained that the four pillars are dependent on each other, making this a particularly complex issue.

While increasing food security is a monumental task, the experts offered several examples of how it can be addressed. For example, Rebecca Middleton described how improving crop diversity can create more resilient farms, increase security even in the face of weather changes, and provide a better selection of food, offering enhanced nutrition for a longer period of time.

Christian Merz added that necessary systemic change can take place in different systems, such as rule advisory and extension services to share knowledge of agricultural practices. He also noted that innovative solutions to food supplies could help reduce poverty—for example, a company could create more drought-tolerant crops, and vary fertilizer blends.

Are there ways that non-farming industry companies can influence food security? The role of technology was an important part of the discussion. Reith noted, “Technology is already being used today to successfully address the food security epidemic.”

Merz agreed. “We certainly believe that digital solutions and technologies are playing an increasingly important role to drive agricultural transformation that is inclusive, putting the small farmer into the driver seat of economic growth in that sector.” He cited the African Soil Information Service, which uses technology to provide detailed soil information, which businesses can use to develop fertilizers for specific needs.

Another example is technology that tracks facilities, replacing error-prone paper-based systems with more efficient electronic ones. Merz explained that people are now able to use smartphones for farmer registration, tracking buying quality and other information.

Learn more about the changing food industry and innovations that are helping address food security by listening to the full replay of this food security session: SAP Future of Food Forum.

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About Joerg Koesters

Joerg Koesters is the Head of Retail Marketing and Communication at SAP. He is a Technology Marketing executive with 20 years of experience in Marketing, Sales and Consulting, Joerg has deep knowledge in retail and consumer products having worked both in the industry and in the technology sector.

Using Data Science For Predictive Maintenance

Sandeep Raut

A few years ago, there were two recall announcements from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, warning of problems that could cause fires in two auto brands. For both automakers, these defect required significant money and time to resolve.

Manufacturers in the aerospace, rail, equipment, and automotive industries face the challenge of ensuring maximum availability of critical assembly line systems and keeping those assets in good working order, while simultaneously minimizing the cost of maintenance and time-based or count-based repairs. Identifying root causes of faults and failures must also happen without labs or testing. As more vehicles, industrial equipment, and assembly robots communicate their status to a central server, detection of faults becomes easier and more practical.

Identifying potential issues early helps organizations deploy maintenance teams more cost-effectively and maximizes parts and equipment uptime. All the critical factors that help predict failure may be deeply buried in structured data (including equipment year, make, model, and warranty details) and unstructured data comprising millions of log entries that include sensor data, error messages, odometer readings, speeds, engine temperatures, engine torque and acceleration records, and repair and maintenance reports.

Predictive maintenance, a technique for predicting when an in-service machine will fail so that maintenance can be planned in advance, encompasses failure prediction, failure diagnosis, failure type classification, and recommendation of maintenance actions after failure. For example, TrenItalia has invested 50 million euros in an Internet of Things project to cut maintenance costs by up to 130 million euros and increase train availability and customer satisfaction.

The benefits of using data science with predictive maintenance include:

  • Minimized maintenance costs. Don’t waste money through over-cautious, time-bound maintenance. Repair equipment only when repairs are actually needed.
  • Reduced unplanned downtime. Implement predictive maintenance to predict future equipment malfunctions and failures, and minimize the risk for unplanned disasters that could put your business at risk.
  • Root-cause analysis. Find causes for equipment malfunctions and work with suppliers to switch off reasons for high failure rates. Increase return on your assets.
  • Efficient labor planning. Stop wasting time replacing and fixing equipment that doesn’t need it.
  • Avoidance of warranty cost to recover failure. Minimize recalls and assembly-line production loss.

Sudden machine failures can result in contract penalties and lost revenue, and can even ruin the reputation of a business. Data science can help avoid problems in real time and before they happen.

For more on how predictive analytics can improve business efficiency, see Using Algorithms To Add Science To Human Judgement In HR.

This article originally appeared in Simplified Analytics.

 

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3 Ways Robots Will Co-Evolve with Humans

Christopher Koch

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About Christopher Koch

Christopher Koch is the Editorial Director of the SAP Center for Business Insight. He is an experienced publishing professional, researcher, editor, and writer in business, technology, and B2B marketing. Share your thoughts with Chris on Twitter @Ckochster.

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Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

About Andre Smith

An Internet, Marketing and E-Commerce specialist with several years of experience in the industry. He has watched as the world of online business has grown and adapted to new technologies, and he has made it his mission to help keep businesses informed and up to date.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

About Neil Patrick

Neil Patrick is director of the GRC Center of Excellence in EMEA for SAP.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Ioana Sima

About Ioana Sima

Ioana Sima is an architecture student at Ion Mincu University of Architecture, CMO of DigitalWebProperties, coffee lover, and avid gamer. Despite my academic background, I decided to pursue a career in digital marketing. Why? Because it's thrilling, fascinating, and unpredictable. My goal is to contribute to the creation of something truly meaningful & to grow professionally. Follow me on Twitter if you enjoy gaming, dank memes, and digital marketing.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Bruce McCuaig

About Bruce McCuaig

Bruce McCuaig is director - Product Marketing at SAP GRC solutions. He is responsible for development and execution of the product marketing strategy for SAP Risk Management, SAP Audit Management and SAP solutions for three lines of defense. Bruce has extensive experience in industry as a finance professional, as a chief risk officer, and as a chief audit executive. He has written and spoken extensively on GRC topics and has worked with clients around the world implementing GRC solutions and technology.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

About Richard Howells

Richard Howells is a Vice President at SAP responsible for the positioning, messaging, AR , PR and go-to market activities for the SAP Supply Chain solutions.

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awareness