Top 20 Sustainability And Supply Chain Blogs

Jen Cohen Crompton

The Harvard Business Review article, The Sustainable Supply Chain, featured an interview with Sustainability And Supply ChainPeter Senge, the founder of the Society for Organizational Learning, a faculty member at MIT Sloan School of Management, and the author of The Fifth Discipline and The Necessary Revolution. In the article, HBR editor, Steven Prokesch, asked an eye-opening question that brings the words “sustainable” and “supply chain” together in a way that forces companies to think about both.

“HBR: What does it take for an organization to get serious about issues like water, energy, and waste in its supply chain?

Senge: It starts to get real when people believe these matters are strategic—that they will shape the future of the business. I use the word “sustainability” as little as possible because it’s so generic; it makes people’s eyes glaze over.

To confront these issues practically, you need employees who are innovative—who have the skill and the vision to redesign products, processes, and business models—and who understand the business context. Most important, they need to be able to tell a story about why this is a meaningful journey.”

As many companies begin this journey, there are plenty of industry experts who are tweeting and blogging about these topics and how that impact business. Here is a list of some blogs that could serve as a useful resource.

Sustainability Blogs

1. HuffPost Green
The Huffington Post is an American online news source and blog founded by Arianna Huffington, Kenneth Lerer, Andrew Breitbart and Jonah Peretti. The HuffPost Green covers green news, energy, environment, animals, climate change, and extreme weather.

2. Environment Guardian
This blog is affiliated with The Guardian, which is an online publication that features the latest news, world news, sports, and reviews from the world’s leading liberal voice. The environment-focused blog features articles that touch on controversial issues and span from climate change, to green living, to wildlife.

3. World Resources Institute
World Resources Institute is a global reach organization that reaches 50 countries with offices in the United States, China, India, Brazil, among others. It incorporates writing from over 300 experts and staff that work closely with leaders to turn big ideas into action to sustain our natural resources.

4. The Ecologist
The Ecologist was established in 1970 by Edward Goldsmith and is now the world’s leading environmental affairs magazine. The website covers everything from climate change to eco-dating – wide range of topics all focused on the environment and the role of businesses and politicians in creating, or preventing change and conservation.

5. The Climate Reality Project
The Climate Reality Project was founded and chaired by former Vice President and Nobel Laureate Al Gore. It is dedicated to unleashing a global cultural movement demanding action on the global community. This blog spreads the truth about climate change to empower leaders to solve the climate crisis.

6. Sustainable Brands: The Bridge to Better Brands

Sustainable Brands was launched in 2006 and since then has become a global learning, collaboration and commerce community of forward-thinking business and brand strategy, marketing and innovation. It incorporates sustainability professionals who are leading the way to a better future. They work to enable the success of better brands that are helping shift the world to a sustainable economy by helping them pursue purpose-driven environmental and social innovation.

7. CSR Wire – Aman Singh
Aman Singh is the Editorial Director of CSRwire.com. She is an experienced CSR practitioner, journalist, social media strategist and founder of Singh Solutions. She has written for numerous publication including The Wall Street Journal, Forbes.com, Triple Pundit, CNBC, Bloomberg and Businessweek. She is a frequent speaker on CSR and sustainable business practices, the role of media in social change, and job-hunting in CSR.

8. SustainAbility
SustainAbility, established in 1987, has worked to catalyze innovation and provide solutions to make business and markets sustainable. They help to define and shape the unique role of business and their vision is for a just and sustainable world for present and future generations.

9. Mark Gunther’s Blog
Marc Gunter is an experienced journalist, speaker, and writer whose focus is on business and sustainability. He is the editor at large of Guardian Sustainable Business US and a contributor at FORTUNE magazine. In addition, he also has co-authored four books and was published in 2012 as an Amazon Kindle Single.

10. Taiga Company Blog
The Taiga Company was founded to address the growing need for individuals and organizations to embrace sustainability through the power of engagement. They do so through demonstrated eco-action and communication of the sustainable mindset.

Supply Chain Management

1. Supply Management
Supply Management Magazine is the premiere publication for procurement and supply chain professionals globally. This blog features quick fire topics and posts that deal with purchasing and supply chain issues from independent expert commentators and the Supply Management editorial team.

2. Supply Chain Nation-The Supply Chain Blog
This blog is filled with thought leaders that will help you create and discover supply chain ideas and innovations. The blog is a conversational blog about industry trends that are affecting your business best practices and market insights around supply chain, merchandising and pricing innovation.

3. The 21st Century Supply Chain
Kinaxis delivers a comprehensive on-demand supply chain offering, which enables manufacturers and brand owners to drive supply chain management. This blog features various members of their team and the occasional guest writer with the purpose of providing insights on supply chain trends and issues affecting the business world.

4. Supply Chain Management Review
Supply Chain Management Review publishes columns and features pieces written by business school professors, supply chain management practitioners and industry analyst. These authors write on subject matters such as sourcing and procurement, software and technology, transportation and logistics, and supply chain education. The blog also features case studies on well-known companies such as Wal-Mart, Motorola, and IBM.

5. Supply Chain Digital
Founded 2007 by entrepreneur Glen White, Supply Chain Digital is the leading online source of logistics, procurement, warehousing, and outsourcing news geared toward executives in the supply chain industry.  The blog covers topics that involve the global supply chain.

6. Logistics Management
Logistics Management was established in 1962 and reaches the largest number of logistics professionals in the industry. In addition, they reach more audited buying influencers of logistics services, technology, and equipment than any other industry publication out there.

7. Supply Chain Insights
Supply Chain Insights was founded in 2012 by Lora Cecere and is focused on delivering independent, actionable and objective advice for supply chain leaders. Their overall mission is to be the first place supply chain leaders turn to get information that matters in driving supply chain excellence.

8. SupplyChainNetwork.com: Ask, Learn, Build and Collaborate
This blog is written and maintained by Jeff Ashcroft who developed the Supply Chain Network Project in 2001. Ashcroft is currently the Director, Business Development at SCI Group, which is focused on Retail & e-Commerce Third Party Logistics in Canada. The blog features top news in the logistics industry and information about supply chain management.

9. ValueStream Blog – Dave Meyer
David Meyer is Founder and Principal of ValueStream Performance Advisors. He has over 30 years of progressive experience in environmental sustainability, energy efficiency, and evaluation. His principal focus is to help organizations achieve environmental sustainability program excellence, leverage regulatory compliance risks, and optimize organizational effectiveness.

10. 10x Logistics Blog by Kevin O’Meara
Kevin O’Meara has 25 years of experience in Logistics and Supply Chain Services providing thought leadership thorough execution and sustained results. He works at Breakthrough Fuel and attended Cornell University.

…and here is another that we thought should make the list:

11. Steve Brady’s The Professor Notes Blog
This blog is written by Steve Brady. He is a professor and Supply Chain Consultant and CEO of Supply Chain Innovations Today. He has strong professional interest in Collaborative Supply Chain Management, RFID in the Supply Chain (EPC) and Research Methods.

Other Resources

 

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About Jen Cohen Crompton

Jen Cohen Crompton is a SAP Blogging Correspondent reporting on big data, cloud computing, enterprise mobility, analytics, sports and tech, and anything else innovation-related. When she's not blogging, she can be caught marketing, using social media and/or presenting at conferences around the world. Disclosure: Jen is being compensated by SAP to produce a series of articles on the innovation topics covered on this site. The opinions reflected here are her own.

How to Take Advantage Of 3D Printing Service Parts In Aerospace

Thomas Pohl

The time of 3D printing being a hobbyist’s plaything is in the past. Not only has additive manufacturing come into its own, but it is rapidly gaining ground as a more sustainable technology than centralized systems that require shipping networks to get goods to market. In the aerospace industry, we’re seeing more use of 3D printing than in the past; for example, GE has produced a 3D-printed 1,300 HP advanced turboprop engine. But one area where 3D printing technology is expected to have the largest impact on the aerospace industry is in parts printing.

The aerospace industry was one of the first adopters of 3D printing technology, beginning in 1988, only four short years from the first patent registration for the technology. At the time, it was only used for modeling and prototypes. A little over a decade later, industry leaders started to explore the full potential of the technology.

Today, it’s clear there are a number of areas where 3D printing of service parts can benefit the aerospace industry.

Increased asset uptime

Because airline fleets are always on the go, it can be difficult to anticipate in what locations and at what times specific parts may be needed. Internet of Things (IoT) technology improves inventory tracking, but that isn’t the solution when you don’t have the right part where it’s needed. Aircraft-on-ground delays can cause serious problems in a number of areas, and 3D-printed parts help avoid this issue and improve overall fleet uptime. Personnel in the hanger can simply print a new part instead of maintaining an exhaustive inventory or hoping the part comes in quickly.

Reduced cost

Beyond the problems of grounded assets, 3D-printed parts also reduce costs. When an asset is grounded, it can quickly become an expensive problem. A typical “B check” maintenance issue that grounds a plane has an average cost of $60,000. The crew must be moved to other aircraft or lodged locally; replacement parts need to be shipped in (if they’re not on location); fleet coordination is impacted; flight schedules are thrown off; and service-level agreement (SLA) compliance becomes an issue. And that’s before you deal with the resulting customer service issues.

Lighter components

In aeronautics, weight is money, and 3D-printed parts could lighten the components used in aircraft. Reducing the weight of your components means using less fuel to get off the ground. A recent contest by GE challenged designers to create an engine bracket designed for production with a 3D printer. The winning entry produced an 83.4% reduction in weight, from 2 kg to a svelte 327 grams. That may not seem like much on a 400-ton aircraft, but it’s just that much less weight to get in the air.

More durability

It’s much easier to design 3D-printed components for strength and durability versus manufacturing ease. “We get five times the durability. We have a lighter-weight fuel nozzle. And we frankly have a fuel nozzle that operates in an environment more effectively and more efficiently than previous fuel nozzles,” Greg Morris, head of GE Aviation’s additive printing division, said in an interview. The ability to design and print parts remotely makes updates to fleet assets much easier to implement.

Improved customer satisfaction

In aeronautics, customer satisfaction has a huge impact on a company’s bottom line. It’s estimated that in 2016, flight delays cost airlines $25 billion in actual expenses, and that figure does not include damage to an airline’s reputation. If an airline becomes known for flight delays and maintenance issues, it’s less likely to be used by consumers. Having 3D printing capabilities for a number of parts helps reduce flight delays and keeps cancellations to a minimum. It also helps improve overall fleet uptime and reputation for excellence.

By adding 3D printing capability, aeronautics companies can enjoy lean operations with better flexibility and resiliency. It provides a range of benefits, including avoiding aircraft-on-ground problems. By placing a 3D printer at the hanger or a nearby distribution warehouse, response time is drastically improved, costs are reduced, and excess inventory is eliminated.

Digitization and disruption require businesses to be lean and agile. This is true of all industries, including aeronautics. While 3D printing was initially used for out-of-production or slow-moving inventory parts, it’s progressing into more complex parts as the technology has improved.

As part of an overall digitization plan, 3D printing allows companies to respond faster to industry changes. Imagine a scenario where sensors in your assets sense a problem in a particular part of your aircraft. Those sensors automatically contact the arrival airport, which 3D-prints the part while the plane is still in the air. Wait time decreases and the plane gets back in the air faster. The future of aeronautics is now. Where does your business stand?

Read this whitepaper to understand how a digital world in aerospace and defense industry can help you to reinvent products, services, and core business processes.

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Thomas Pohl

About Thomas Pohl

Thomas Pohl is a Senior Director Marketing at SAP. He helps global high tech and aerospace companies to simplify their business by taking innovative software solutions to market.

How Blockchain Can Restore Trust In The Wine Industry

Eric Annino

Blockchain is one of those things that everyone talks about but no one (myself included) really understands—like bitcoin or the stock market. I do understand, however, that blockchain is all about trust, and that’s the reason it’s going to revolutionize every industry. It’s also the reason it can revolutionize wine markets.

Fine wine has traditionally been bought and sold based on large measures of trust. A seller offers a bottle for sale, most likely something rare, old, or from an iconic maker; provides a reasonably good story of origin (or provenance) to establish that the wine is authentic and has been stored correctly; and buyers line up to shell out thousands, if not tens of thousands, of dollars.

That has changed in the last decade.

In 2008, Benjamin Wallace’s true crime hit The Billionaire’s Vinegar (soon to be a movie starring Matthew McConaughey) brought to light the story of a German music manager and wine collector who allegedly duped other wealthy collectors into buying counterfeit wine (i.e., wine that has been adulterated in some way, often passed off under a more expensive brand), including several bottles he claimed belonged to Thomas Jefferson.

Wallace’s book became a New York Times bestseller and planted a significant seed of doubt in the minds of collectors everywhere.

Half a decade later, the wine world was again shaken when wine-collector-turned-wine-forger Rudy Kurniawan was sentenced to ten years in prison for defrauding high-end collectors to the tune of at least $20 million. (For the whole story, check out Peter Hellman’s new book In Vino Duplicitas.) In the wake of the “Rudy affair,” auction houses began to withdraw lots of wine of suspicious provenance. Lawsuits followed, and one prominent collector—billionaire Bill Koch, who fell victim to both Rudy and the alleged forger of Wallace’s book, Hardy Rodenstock—even began a crusade against fake wine, hiring a team of experts and spending more than $20 million of his own money to ferret out counterfeiters.

Trust in fine wine markets has never been lower, but blockchain has brought hope.

Meet Everledger, a London-based blockchain technology firm and the first company to secure a wine’s provenance via blockchain. After making its mark fighting counterfeiting in the diamond industry, Everledger made the jump to wine, and has partnered with renowned wine fraud specialist Maureen Downey (who played an important role in the Rudy Kurniawan investigation) to create the Chai Wine Vault.

Using Maureen’s Chai Method, which identifies more than 90 data points on a bottle, along with high-resolution photographs and ownership and storage records, Everledger creates a permanent, digital representation of a bottle on the blockchain. This permanent record acts as a verification point as the bottle changes hands. The blockchain is updated along the way so anyone who buys or sells the bottle can rely on trustworthy provenance.

This level of supply chain security is increasingly vital to every industry. “If you can track and trace diamonds, you can track and trace anything,” says Joe Fox, SAP Ariba’s Senior VP of Business Development and Strategy.

“One of the things blockchain does is facilitate greater visibility and trust. In embedding it across our applications and network, we can enable supply chains that are smarter, faster and more transparent from sourcing all the way through settlement.”

Wine counterfeiting isn’t new—Pliny the Elder lamented the practice in first century Rome—but it’s certainly reaching new heights. Experts, Downey included, have suggested that as much as 20 percent of wine sold globally is fraudulent. An estimated 10,000 “Rudy bottles” are still in circulation, and just last week, police seized 6,000 bottles of counterfeit wine in China.

For wine markets everywhere, blockchain is a timely innovation that underscores the value of trust in any transaction.

For more on blockchain’s potential to impact business processes, see Improve User Experience With Internet Of Things, Blockchain, And Platforms.

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Eric Annino

About Eric Annino

Eric Annino works for Global Corporate Affairs at SAP.

Diving Deep Into Digital Experiences

Kai Goerlich

 

Google Cardboard VR goggles cost US$8
By 2019, immersive solutions
will be adopted in 20% of enterprise businesses
By 2025, the market for immersive hardware and software technology could be $182 billion
In 2017, Lowe’s launched
Holoroom How To VR DIY clinics

From Dipping a Toe to Fully Immersed

The first wave of virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) is here,

using smartphones, glasses, and goggles to place us in the middle of 360-degree digital environments or overlay digital artifacts on the physical world. Prototypes, pilot projects, and first movers have already emerged:

  • Guiding warehouse pickers, cargo loaders, and truck drivers with AR
  • Overlaying constantly updated blueprints, measurements, and other construction data on building sites in real time with AR
  • Building 3D machine prototypes in VR for virtual testing and maintenance planning
  • Exhibiting new appliances and fixtures in a VR mockup of the customer’s home
  • Teaching medicine with AR tools that overlay diagnostics and instructions on patients’ bodies

A Vast Sea of Possibilities

Immersive technologies leapt forward in spring 2017 with the introduction of three new products:

  • Nvidia’s Project Holodeck, which generates shared photorealistic VR environments
  • A cloud-based platform for industrial AR from Lenovo New Vision AR and Wikitude
  • A workspace and headset from Meta that lets users use their hands to interact with AR artifacts

The Truly Digital Workplace

New immersive experiences won’t simply be new tools for existing tasks. They promise to create entirely new ways of working.

VR avatars that look and sound like their owners will soon be able to meet in realistic virtual meeting spaces without requiring users to leave their desks or even their homes. With enough computing power and a smart-enough AI, we could soon let VR avatars act as our proxies while we’re doing other things—and (theoretically) do it well enough that no one can tell the difference.

We’ll need a way to signal when an avatar is being human driven in real time, when it’s on autopilot, and when it’s owned by a bot.


What Is Immersion?

A completely immersive experience that’s indistinguishable from real life is impossible given the current constraints on power, throughput, and battery life.

To make current digital experiences more convincing, we’ll need interactive sensors in objects and materials, more powerful infrastructure to create realistic images, and smarter interfaces to interpret and interact with data.

When everything around us is intelligent and interactive, every environment could have an AR overlay or VR presence, with use cases ranging from gaming to firefighting.

We could see a backlash touting the superiority of the unmediated physical world—but multisensory immersive experiences that we can navigate in 360-degree space will change what we consider “real.”


Download the executive brief Diving Deep Into Digital Experiences.


Read the full article Swimming in the Immersive Digital Experience.

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Kai Goerlich

About Kai Goerlich

Kai Goerlich is the Chief Futurist at SAP Innovation Center network His specialties include Competitive Intelligence, Market Intelligence, Corporate Foresight, Trends, Futuring and ideation. Share your thoughts with Kai on Twitter @KaiGoe.heif Futu

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Jenny Dearborn: Soft Skills Will Be Essential for Future Careers

Jenny Dearborn

The Japanese culture has always shown a special reverence for its elderly. That’s why, in 1963, the government began a tradition of giving a silver dish, called a sakazuki, to each citizen who reached the age of 100 by Keiro no Hi (Respect for the Elders Day), which is celebrated on the third Monday of each September.

That first year, there were 153 recipients, according to The Japan Times. By 2016, the number had swelled to more than 65,000, and the dishes cost the already cash-strapped government more than US$2 million, Business Insider reports. Despite the country’s continued devotion to its seniors, the article continues, the government felt obliged to downgrade the finish of the dishes to silver plating to save money.

What tends to get lost in discussions about automation taking over jobs and Millennials taking over the workplace is the impact of increased longevity. In the future, people will need to be in the workforce much longer than they are today. Half of the people born in Japan today, for example, are predicted to live to 107, making their ancestors seem fragile, according to Lynda Gratton and Andrew Scott, professors at the London Business School and authors of The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in an Age of Longevity.

The End of the Three-Stage Career

Assuming that advances in healthcare continue, future generations in wealthier societies could be looking at careers lasting 65 or more years, rather than at the roughly 40 years for today’s 70-year-olds, write Gratton and Scott. The three-stage model of employment that dominates the global economy today—education, work, and retirement—will be blown out of the water.

It will be replaced by a new model in which people continually learn new skills and shed old ones. Consider that today’s most in-demand occupations and specialties did not exist 10 years ago, according to The Future of Jobs, a report from the World Economic Forum.

And the pace of change is only going to accelerate. Sixty-five percent of children entering primary school today will ultimately end up working in jobs that don’t yet exist, the report notes.

Our current educational systems are not equipped to cope with this degree of change. For example, roughly half of the subject knowledge acquired during the first year of a four-year technical degree, such as computer science, is outdated by the time students graduate, the report continues.

Skills That Transcend the Job Market

Instead of treating post-secondary education as a jumping-off point for a specific career path, we may see a switch to a shorter school career that focuses more on skills that transcend a constantly shifting job market. Today, some of these skills, such as complex problem solving and critical thinking, are taught mostly in the context of broader disciplines, such as math or the humanities.

Other competencies that will become critically important in the future are currently treated as if they come naturally or over time with maturity or experience. We receive little, if any, formal training, for example, in creativity and innovation, empathy, emotional intelligence, cross-cultural awareness, persuasion, active listening, and acceptance of change. (No wonder the self-help marketplace continues to thrive!)

The three-stage model of employment that dominates the global economy today—education, work, and retirement—will be blown out of the water.

These skills, which today are heaped together under the dismissive “soft” rubric, are going to harden up to become indispensable. They will become more important, thanks to artificial intelligence and machine learning, which will usher in an era of infinite information, rendering the concept of an expert in most of today’s job disciplines a quaint relic. As our ability to know more than those around us decreases, our need to be able to collaborate well (with both humans and machines) will help define our success in the future.

Individuals and organizations alike will have to learn how to become more flexible and ready to give up set-in-stone ideas about how businesses and careers are supposed to operate. Given the rapid advances in knowledge and attendant skills that the future will bring, we must be willing to say, repeatedly, that whatever we’ve learned to that point doesn’t apply anymore.

Careers will become more like life itself: a series of unpredictable, fluid experiences rather than a tightly scripted narrative. We need to think about the way forward and be more willing to accept change at the individual and organizational levels.

Rethink Employee Training

One way that organizations can help employees manage this shift is by rethinking training. Today, overworked and overwhelmed employees devote just 1% of their workweek to learning, according to a study by consultancy Bersin by Deloitte. Meanwhile, top business leaders such as Bill Gates and Nike founder Phil Knight spend about five hours a week reading, thinking, and experimenting, according to an article in Inc. magazine.

If organizations are to avoid high turnover costs in a world where the need for new skills is shifting constantly, they must give employees more time for learning and make training courses more relevant to the future needs of organizations and individuals, not just to their current needs.

The amount of learning required will vary by role. That’s why at SAP we’re creating learning personas for specific roles in the company and determining how many hours will be required for each. We’re also dividing up training hours into distinct topics:

  • Law: 10%. This is training required by law, such as training to prevent sexual harassment in the workplace.

  • Company: 20%. Company training includes internal policies and systems.

  • Business: 30%. Employees learn skills required for their current roles in their business units.

  • Future: 40%. This is internal, external, and employee-driven training to close critical skill gaps for jobs of the future.

In the future, we will always need to learn, grow, read, seek out knowledge and truth, and better ourselves with new skills. With the support of employers and educators, we will transform our hardwired fear of change into excitement for change.

We must be able to say to ourselves, “I’m excited to learn something new that I never thought I could do or that never seemed possible before.” D!

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