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Top 20 Sustainability And Supply Chain Blogs

Jen Cohen Crompton

The Harvard Business Review article, The Sustainable Supply Chain, featured an interview with Sustainability And Supply ChainPeter Senge, the founder of the Society for Organizational Learning, a faculty member at MIT Sloan School of Management, and the author of The Fifth Discipline and The Necessary Revolution. In the article, HBR editor, Steven Prokesch, asked an eye-opening question that brings the words “sustainable” and “supply chain” together in a way that forces companies to think about both.

“HBR: What does it take for an organization to get serious about issues like water, energy, and waste in its supply chain?

Senge: It starts to get real when people believe these matters are strategic—that they will shape the future of the business. I use the word “sustainability” as little as possible because it’s so generic; it makes people’s eyes glaze over.

To confront these issues practically, you need employees who are innovative—who have the skill and the vision to redesign products, processes, and business models—and who understand the business context. Most important, they need to be able to tell a story about why this is a meaningful journey.”

As many companies begin this journey, there are plenty of industry experts who are tweeting and blogging about these topics and how that impact business. Here is a list of some blogs that could serve as a useful resource.

Sustainability Blogs

1. HuffPost Green
The Huffington Post is an American online news source and blog founded by Arianna Huffington, Kenneth Lerer, Andrew Breitbart and Jonah Peretti. The HuffPost Green covers green news, energy, environment, animals, climate change, and extreme weather.

2. Environment Guardian
This blog is affiliated with The Guardian, which is an online publication that features the latest news, world news, sports, and reviews from the world’s leading liberal voice. The environment-focused blog features articles that touch on controversial issues and span from climate change, to green living, to wildlife.

3. World Resources Institute
World Resources Institute is a global reach organization that reaches 50 countries with offices in the United States, China, India, Brazil, among others. It incorporates writing from over 300 experts and staff that work closely with leaders to turn big ideas into action to sustain our natural resources.

4. The Ecologist
The Ecologist was established in 1970 by Edward Goldsmith and is now the world’s leading environmental affairs magazine. The website covers everything from climate change to eco-dating – wide range of topics all focused on the environment and the role of businesses and politicians in creating, or preventing change and conservation.

5. The Climate Reality Project
The Climate Reality Project was founded and chaired by former Vice President and Nobel Laureate Al Gore. It is dedicated to unleashing a global cultural movement demanding action on the global community. This blog spreads the truth about climate change to empower leaders to solve the climate crisis.

6. Sustainable Brands: The Bridge to Better Brands

Sustainable Brands was launched in 2006 and since then has become a global learning, collaboration and commerce community of forward-thinking business and brand strategy, marketing and innovation. It incorporates sustainability professionals who are leading the way to a better future. They work to enable the success of better brands that are helping shift the world to a sustainable economy by helping them pursue purpose-driven environmental and social innovation.

7. CSR Wire – Aman Singh
Aman Singh is the Editorial Director of CSRwire.com. She is an experienced CSR practitioner, journalist, social media strategist and founder of Singh Solutions. She has written for numerous publication including The Wall Street Journal, Forbes.com, Triple Pundit, CNBC, Bloomberg and Businessweek. She is a frequent speaker on CSR and sustainable business practices, the role of media in social change, and job-hunting in CSR.

8. SustainAbility
SustainAbility, established in 1987, has worked to catalyze innovation and provide solutions to make business and markets sustainable. They help to define and shape the unique role of business and their vision is for a just and sustainable world for present and future generations.

9. Mark Gunther’s Blog
Marc Gunter is an experienced journalist, speaker, and writer whose focus is on business and sustainability. He is the editor at large of Guardian Sustainable Business US and a contributor at FORTUNE magazine. In addition, he also has co-authored four books and was published in 2012 as an Amazon Kindle Single.

10. Taiga Company Blog
The Taiga Company was founded to address the growing need for individuals and organizations to embrace sustainability through the power of engagement. They do so through demonstrated eco-action and communication of the sustainable mindset.

Supply Chain Management

1. Supply Management
Supply Management Magazine is the premiere publication for procurement and supply chain professionals globally. This blog features quick fire topics and posts that deal with purchasing and supply chain issues from independent expert commentators and the Supply Management editorial team.

2. Supply Chain Nation-The Supply Chain Blog
This blog is filled with thought leaders that will help you create and discover supply chain ideas and innovations. The blog is a conversational blog about industry trends that are affecting your business best practices and market insights around supply chain, merchandising and pricing innovation.

3. The 21st Century Supply Chain
Kinaxis delivers a comprehensive on-demand supply chain offering, which enables manufacturers and brand owners to drive supply chain management. This blog features various members of their team and the occasional guest writer with the purpose of providing insights on supply chain trends and issues affecting the business world.

4. Supply Chain Management Review
Supply Chain Management Review publishes columns and features pieces written by business school professors, supply chain management practitioners and industry analyst. These authors write on subject matters such as sourcing and procurement, software and technology, transportation and logistics, and supply chain education. The blog also features case studies on well-known companies such as Wal-Mart, Motorola, and IBM.

5. Supply Chain Digital
Founded 2007 by entrepreneur Glen White, Supply Chain Digital is the leading online source of logistics, procurement, warehousing, and outsourcing news geared toward executives in the supply chain industry.  The blog covers topics that involve the global supply chain.

6. Logistics Management
Logistics Management was established in 1962 and reaches the largest number of logistics professionals in the industry. In addition, they reach more audited buying influencers of logistics services, technology, and equipment than any other industry publication out there.

7. Supply Chain Insights
Supply Chain Insights was founded in 2012 by Lora Cecere and is focused on delivering independent, actionable and objective advice for supply chain leaders. Their overall mission is to be the first place supply chain leaders turn to get information that matters in driving supply chain excellence.

8. SupplyChainNetwork.com: Ask, Learn, Build and Collaborate
This blog is written and maintained by Jeff Ashcroft who developed the Supply Chain Network Project in 2001. Ashcroft is currently the Director, Business Development at SCI Group, which is focused on Retail & e-Commerce Third Party Logistics in Canada. The blog features top news in the logistics industry and information about supply chain management.

9. ValueStream Blog – Dave Meyer
David Meyer is Founder and Principal of ValueStream Performance Advisors. He has over 30 years of progressive experience in environmental sustainability, energy efficiency, and evaluation. His principal focus is to help organizations achieve environmental sustainability program excellence, leverage regulatory compliance risks, and optimize organizational effectiveness.

10. 10x Logistics Blog by Kevin O’Meara
Kevin O’Meara has 25 years of experience in Logistics and Supply Chain Services providing thought leadership thorough execution and sustained results. He works at Breakthrough Fuel and attended Cornell University.

…and here is another that we thought should make the list:

11. Steve Brady’s The Professor Notes Blog
This blog is written by Steve Brady. He is a professor and Supply Chain Consultant and CEO of Supply Chain Innovations Today. He has strong professional interest in Collaborative Supply Chain Management, RFID in the Supply Chain (EPC) and Research Methods.

Other Resources

 

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About Jen Cohen Crompton

Jen Cohen Crompton is a SAP Blogging Correspondent reporting on big data, cloud computing, enterprise mobility, analytics, sports and tech, and anything else innovation-related. When she's not blogging, she can be caught marketing, using social media and/or presenting at conferences around the world. Disclosure: Jen is being compensated by SAP to produce a series of articles on the innovation topics covered on this site. The opinions reflected here are her own.

5 Supply Chain And Digital Economy Myths Debunked

Richard Howells

The digital economy is presenting businesses with myriad opportunities. But to capitalize on these prospects, companies must be willing to adapt, particularly in regard to how they manage their existing supply chain operations.

While people are finally beginning to recognize the potential benefits that come with the digital economy, too few companies are digitizing their operations in an effort to thrive in this dynamic environment. In fact, according to SAP research, 71% of organizations consider their digital maturity levels to be in the “early” or “developing” stages.

Given that fact, it’s entirely possible that people still don’t fully grasp the importance of transforming their existing business models and processes to succeed in today’s digital economy.

Below are five statements related to the digital economy and supply chain that many people believe to be true – and an explanation on why they are, indeed, false.

Myth #1: Your existing supply chain is sufficient to help you thrive in the digital economy

“To win in the digital economy,” says Hans Thalbauer, senior vice president of extended supply chain at SAP, “we have to reimagine how we design, plan, make, deliver, and operate our products and assets.”

Companies must put themselves in a position to develop environments in which they can access and manage data and processes in real time. This requires transforming your traditional supply chain into a digitized, extended supply chain, one that enables your business to be more connected, intelligent, responsive, and predictive.

By reimagining your existing supply chain, you can deliver superior customer experiences and increase revenue. In fact, companies that adapt to the digital world are 26% more profitable than their industry peers, according to MIT Sloan research.

Myth #2: Customers aren’t willing to pay for better experiences

Today’s customers crave a new type of experience. Omnichannel solutions can provide this, enabling buyers to discover a product online, research it on a mobile device, and purchase it in a retail store.

Given that these capabilities exist, your company needs to ensure it can deliver on the omnichannel fulfillment promise. To achieve this, the different channels must be able to support the development and/or delivery of goods, based on each individual customer’s preferences.

Customers are so eager for a better purchasing experience, 86% of them are willing to pay more money to get it, according to a 2014 American Express and Ebiquity survey.

By reimagining your existing supply chain and transforming it into a digitized, extended supply chain, you can gain the real-time insight you need to enable customer-centric processes and truly satisfy your buyers.

Myth #3: Customers love mass-produced products

Each and every one of your customers is wholly unique. So it’s no surprise that buyers are increasingly seeking out products that are customized to their individual preferences and needs.

Forty-two percent of consumers are interested in technology to customize and personalize products, and 19% are willing to pay a 10% price premium to individualize products, according to a Deloitte research study.

This growing demand for product customization is challenging companies considerably. Traditionally, supply chain organizations merely had to manufacture and/or ship full pallets of identical goods. Now, they’re tasked with delivering a lot size of one.

To support your customers’ growing desire for individualized products, your business must transform how it designs, produces, and delivers goods and services. It must embrace the latest technologies, harnessing the power of the Internet of Things (IoT), 3D printing, and other cutting-edge innovations.

By adopting a digital supply chain and smart manufacturing techniques, you can enable greater connectivity, responsiveness, agility, and reliability, empowering you to better meet your customers’ demands for individualized products.

Myth #4: Businesses can’t benefit from the sharing economy

The sharing economy revolves around the sharing of human and physical resources. Generally, consumers love it. Businesses, on the other hand, view it with great skepticism, wondering how it can actually benefit their companies.

At the heart of the sharing economy lies connectivity. When everything is connected, you can collaborate like never before.

Through the sharing economy, you can better link your organization with manufacturers, logistics service providers, and other partners. This larger business network enables companies to capitalize on their partners’ resources, expand their reach, innovate, and improve customer service.

Taking full advantage of a connected enterprise of companies requires putting an extended supply chain at the core of your operations. This allows you to have greater visibility into various customer, supplier, manufacturer, and other insights, ensuring you can improve decision making and respond to in-the-moment changes and demands.

Networked businesses, according to McKinsey & Company, are 50% more likely than their peers to be market leaders.

Myth #5: You simply cannot overcome resource scarcity

Resources are declining globally. Raw materials such as water, minerals, oil, and gas are becoming increasingly difficult to obtain. Human talent is also growing scarcer, as employees lack the requisite skills to manage the data that comes with running digitized, extended supply chains.

Today’s organizations need to begin building sustainability into their business processes. From a talent perspective, companies can achieve this a number of ways, from deploying a contingent labor force to replacing certain roles with robotics. To combat resource scarcity, manufacturers must start doing more with less, leveraging alternate sources of energy and reused or recycled materials.

Finally, another key to ensuring your organization is run in a sustainable manner is to emphasize safety and risk management. Protecting your staff from harm and your resources from damage go hand in hand with your company’s long-term success.

The truth about prospering in today’s complex digital economy

Now that you’ve read a few myths about the digital economy and supply chain, here’s an undeniable truth: Digital transformation is the only tried-and-true way to survive and thrive in today’s dynamic new environment.

Whether providing a superior customer experience, delivering the individualized products your buyers yearn for, or overcoming resource scarcity, only digitization can ensure you possess the capabilities necessary to realize your greatest business goals.

Download this free white paper, Digitizing the Extended Supply Chain, to further explore how your enterprise can combat complexity and accelerate growth in today’s complex digital economy.

This blog was originally published on SCW Magazine

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About Richard Howells

Richard Howells is a Vice President at SAP responsible for the positioning, messaging, AR , PR and go-to market activities for the SAP Supply Chain solutions.

Lenovo’s “Disciplined” Supply Chain Drives Global Leadership

John Ward

“Lenovo’s been the number one PC company for over three years now,” says Gerry Smith, an executive vice president at Lenovo and president of its Data Center Group, in a recent video.

In fact, Lenovo’s 2015 PC sales represented about 20% of total market share according to Gartner.

That’s a pretty remarkable accomplishment for a company that The Wall Street Journal, described, “as recently as 2005… was a little-known computer maker that sold only in China.”

But a lot has changed in the past 10 years or so – especially in Lenovo’s now worldwide supply chain.

These days, Lenovo has operations in 60 countries, customers around the planet, and it relies on a revamped supply chain driven by such thoroughly modern imperatives as sustainability, product security, real-time planning, and customer-centricity.

Major acquisitions deliver global growth

Lenovo’s dramatic growth has made headlines. In 2005, the company bought IBM’s personal computer business. Then, in 2014 came the acquisitions of both IBM’s Intel-based server business and Motorola Mobility.

And as a result of such bold moves, Lenovo has had to adapt to an increasingly global marketplace and a growing list of international standards and regulations.

As part of an integrated response to its full-scale globalization, Lenovo has established comprehensive sustainability programs across its broad supply chain. These initiatives address operations from internal manufacturing to packaging and logistics. Still other programs help Lenovo evaluate external suppliers on criteria such as employee working conditions, environmental footprint, and the use of environmentally preferred materials. In total, Lenovo reports that it uses more than 25 key indicators to measure vendor transparency, commitment, and performance.

“Working with trusted suppliers – as well as owning and running our own factories – promotes end-to-end security in Lenovo’s supply chain,” says Smith. “These controls help us ensure that products are built with components from known suppliers, guard against hijacking, and protect against compromised firmware updates once our products are deployed.”

Process efficiency is part of the plan

Lenovo’s global supply chain strategy also employs solutions designed to optimize process efficiency. For example, Lenovo implemented an advanced planning and optimization component on an in-memory computing platform to help plan and execute supply chain processes for the newly acquired server business. Additionally, the company partnered  co-developed new applications that support supplier collaboration and help to perform cost forecasting calculations in near real-time.

“We’ve dramatically improved our supply chain performance,” says Smith, “reducing our planning time from 10 hours to 10 minutes.”

As Smith sees it, Lenovo has all the tools in place “to make our supply chain, not only the best PC and server supply chain in the world, but one of the best supply chains across all industries.”

Others obviously agree with Smith’s assessment.

Gartner named Lenovo among its top 25 supply chain companies for 2016. In particular, Gartner cites the high-tech company for the “disciplined approach” it took to integrate its supply chain in the wake of recent acquisitions.

Gartner also notes that Lenovo’s supply chain team ran specific programs to enhance customer experience and operational excellence – like the creation of a customer social/digital platform for key global accounts that presents content tailored to each customer’s preference in terms of order status, new product information, and technical support information. Further, Gartner highlights the fact that Lenovo assigns a supply chain staff member as an executive sponsor for each major account.

A lot has changed since Lenovo was a little-known computer maker that sold only in China.

Please follow me on Twitter at @JohnGWard3.

  • Hear more from Lenovo’s Gerry Smith in this SAP video.
  • Read more about how Lenovo is optimizing supply chain efficiency in this SAP Business Transformation Study.

This story originally appeared on Business Trends on the SAP Community.

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3 Ways Robots Will Co-Evolve with Humans

Christopher Koch

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About Christopher Koch

Christopher Koch is the Editorial Director of the SAP Center for Business Insight. He is an experienced publishing professional, researcher, editor, and writer in business, technology, and B2B marketing. Share your thoughts with Chris on Twitter @Ckochster.

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Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Drew Schiller

About Drew Schiller

Drew Schiller co-founded and serves as the Chief Executive Officer of Validic, the leading digital health platform for connecting patient-generated data from apps, wearables, and in-home medical devices to the healthcare system. At Validic, Drew leads the corporate strategy, drives key day-to-day initiatives, and works closely with senior executives at partner organizations to stay ahead of the innovation curve.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Carolyn Beal

About Carolyn Beal

Carolyn Beal is senior director of Solution Marketing for Social Software at SAP. Her specialties include product marketing, marketing communications, CRM, and demand generation.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Jayne Landry

About Jayne Landry

Jayne Landry is the global vice president and general manager for Business Intelligence at SAP. Ms. Landry joined Crystal Decisions in 2002 and came into SAP through the Business Objects acquisition in 2007. A seasoned executive with 20+ years of experience in the technology sector, Jayne has held leadership roles in high-tech companies in the CRM, mobility, and cloud applications space. Ms. Landry holds a Bachelor of Commerce degree from the University of Auckland, and has continued executive development with Queen’s University, Ontario, and through work with the Sauder School of Business at the University of British Columbia.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim and Michael Rander

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Rick Knowles

About Rick Knowles

Rick Knowles is senior vice president (SVP) and general manager (GM) of the partnership between SAP SE and Apple, Inc. In this role, he oversees the strategic roadmap in building state-of-the-art applications for some of the most complex business systems in the world. Rick has been with SAP for close to 20 years, where he has held executive positions such as SVP and chief of staff, GM of One Customer Experience, and SVP and chief operating officer for SAP Americas, the company’s largest geographic market. You can follow him on Twitter @RickKnowlesSAP.

About Michael Rander

Michael Rander is the Global Research Director for Future Of Work at SAP. He is an experienced project manager, strategic and competitive market researcher, operations manager as well as an avid photographer, athlete, traveler and entrepreneur. Share your thoughts with Michael on Twitter @michaelrander.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Florian Wagner

About Florian Wagner

Florian Wagner is marketing director for IT audience messaging at SAP. Together with his team, he is responsible to address the IT audience and to drive relevant thought leadership topics. He writes about technology trends on digital transformation, cloud and platform strategies with a focus on customer experiences.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

About Michael Brenner

Michael Brenner is a globally-recognized keynote speaker, author of  The Content Formula and the CEO of Marketing Insider GroupHe has worked in leadership positions in sales and marketing for global brands like SAP and Nielsen, as well as for thriving startups. Today, Michael shares his passion on leadership and marketing strategies that deliver customer value and business impact. He is recognized by the Huffington Post as a Top Business Keynote Speaker and   a top  CMO influencer by Forbes.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Verena Wiszinski

About Verena Wiszinski

Verena Wiszinski is a Senior Integrated Marketing Specialist within the Global IT Audience Marketing team at SAP. She enjoys staying connected with customers and thought leaders and talking first hand with them about their experiences, thoughts, and needs within business transformation.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness