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Top 46 Resource And Optimization Influencers (Plus A Few Others)

Jen Cohen Crompton

resource and optimizationFACT: According to the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation, around a third of all the food produced in the world ends up being wasted somewhere along the production and consumption line.

FACT: Around the world, there are 884 million people who lack access to fresh water; by 2040, at least 3.5 billion people will run short of water.

FACT: The population living in urban areas is projected to increase from 3.6 billion in 2011 to 6.3 billion in 2050. Our environment is changing, and so must the way we do business.

These facts about our changing landscape affects all of us in one way or another, and they all point to one commonality – we need to learn how to optimize our resources for more efficient and effective management to ensure the sustainability of businesses, the economy, and the environment.

As companies realize this urgent call to action, they are working to more properly manage their supply chains to reduce waste and improve efficiency, and looking at sustainability and corporate social responsibility to limit, or reverse, the negative effects on resources.

Fortunately, we’ve compiled a list of influencers who can share thoughts and insights on how the world is changing and what we can do to support positive change for businesses and for the greater good.

Here is a list of 46 influencers in supply chain management and sustainability, and 10 companies providing useful information. Enjoy!

Supply chain management influencers

1. Kevin O’Meara – Kevin has over 20 yeasr of experience with logistics and supply chain operations. He enjoys working with all things logistical and supply chain-related and has a special passion for alternative energy.

Twitter: @Logisticsexpert – Website: http://10xlogistics.blogspot.com/

2. Jeff Ashcroft – Jeff is a marketing, supply chain, and retail logistics specialist. He is an agent for green, RFID, social and airships.

Twitter: @JeffAshcroft – Website: scigroup.com

3. Steve Brady – Steve is a professor and has his PhD in supply chain. He is a consultant in areas of inventory, collaborative SCM, and space logistics

Twitter: @SCMProfessor – Website: http://theprofessornotes.com/

4. Sherrie Miller – Sherrie has an MBA and degrees in supply chain management and management information systems, and is interested in strategy, innovation, CRM, and BPM.

Twitter: @SupplyChainSher – Website: http://www.linkedin.com/in/sherriemiller

5. Martin Murray – Martin is an author and About.com expert for logistics and supply chain.

Twitter: @AboutLogistics  – Website: logistics.about.com

6. Brian Hamrock – Brian is a supply chain industry expert, consultant, and social media guru.

Twitter: @scmtechtrends – Website: N/A

7. Dave Meyer – Dave is a senior environmental heath and safety advisor. He is an experienced sustainable business practitioner, advocating for sustainability and supply chain management.

Twitter: @DRMeyer1 – Website: valuestream2009.wordpress.com

8. Dave Inglis – Dave is all about providing practical supply chain management, process mapping, and business improvement.

Twitter: @SCMDude – Website: louisvilleconsult.co.uk

9. Cheryl Berklich – Cheryl has expertise in building top-performing, world-class procurement operations. She has a proven track record of driving dynamic cost reductions and productivity in expense and capital operations for small, mid-size, Fortune 500 and Fortune 50 settings.

Twitter: @cherylberklich – Website: http://www.linkedin.com/in/cherylberklich

10. Dustin Mattison – Dustin is an education innovator, social entrepreneur, teacher, and writer. He is interested in building knowledge platforms that create unique learning environments and interviews supply chain experts for the Kinaxis Supply Chain Expert Community.

Twitter: @dustinmattison – Webite: http://dustinmattison.com/

11. Matt Wilkerson – Matt is a supply chain, operations, and technology transformation leader.

Twitter:@SupplyChainIT – Website: synthesis-advisory.com

12. Mike Stay – Mike is a general manager with experience in leader operations, supply chain, and logistics.

Twitter: @MikeStay – Website: linkedin.com/in/mikestay

13. Tony Colwell – Tony is an executive interim manager and consultant in procurement, supply chain, and change management. He is passionate about stakeholder engagement and effective process.

Twitter: @tonycolwell – Website: acuityconsultants.com/wp/

14. Lisa Ellram – Lisa is a supply chain researcher, educator, and professional interested in sustainability, value enhancement, cost management, and offshoring/outsourcing.

Twitter: @SupplyChainLisa – Website: N/A

15. Paul Snell – Paul is a procurement and supply chain journalist at Supply Management and Supply Business.

Twitter: @procurementpaul – Website: supplymanagement.com

16. Lisa Anderson – Lisa is a supply chain expert and business consultant who helps manufacturers and distributors elevate business performance.

Twitter: @LisaAndersonLMA – Website: lma-consultinggroup.com  

17. Kenneth Kowal – Kenneth focuses on supply chain logistics, ecommerce order fulfillment, and social media. He has worked with hundreds of companies, from lone entrepreneurs with a vision to Fortune 100 companies, on virtually every aspect of their logistics supply chain.

Twitter: @kennethkowal – Website: logisticsbi.com

18. Randy McClure – Randy is advancing transportation and supply chain management through IT innovation. His current focus is to help shippers and transportation carriers achieve 100 percent on-time delivery and leverage 100 percent of transportation costs.

Twitter: @mcislog

19. Mark Gavoor – Mark is a supply chain and quality consultant, writer, speaker, and professor.

Twitter: @mgavoor – Website: http://cr-supplychain.com

20. Tom Napier – Tom focuses on discussing supply chain management, innovation, logistics, and project management ideas.

Twitter: @Tom_Napier – Website:  PSIengineering.com

21. Paul Baris – Paul is a supply chain guru and senior executive, involved with purchasing, distribution, forecasting, and transportation. He is a supply chain transformer and problem-solver with extensive experience driving results and changing cultures.

Twitter: @scguru – Website: N/A

Sustainability Influencers:

22. Marc Gunther – Marc is a writer and speaker on business and sustainability, editor-at-large Guardian Sustainable Business Us, and a contributor at Fortune.

Twitter: @MarcGunther – Website: marcgunther.com

23. Jim McClelland – Jim is a sustainable futurist, writer, and speaker. As a journalist, he  has written supplements to The Times, and has been quoted in The Guardian, Telegraph and Sunday Times.

Twitter: @SustMeme – Website: jimtheeditor.wordpress.com

24. Andrew Winston – Andrew is a globally recognized business consultant-speaker-writer, hoping to change minds. He is an author Green to Gold, Green Recovery, and The Big Pivot.

Twitter: @AndrewWinston – Website: andrewwinston.com

25. John Elkington – John is the co-founder of Volans, an environmental and sustainability data service. He wrote 18 books and blogs at Volans, CSRWire, and Guardian.

Twitter: @volansjohn – Website: volans.com

26. Chris Price – Chris is a young profession and entrepreneur in LA who is deep into everything green and sustainable.

Twitter: @ahtohg – Website: N/A

27. Dave Stangis – VP Public Affairs/CR for the Campbell’s CSR Foundation. He has experience in working across all levels of public corporations (Board of Directors to front lines), non-profit agencies, and with policymakers.

Twitter: @DaveStangis – Website: campbellsoupcompany.com/csr

28. Hunter Lovins – Hunter is a social entrepreneur who consults to large corporations, small businesses, communities, and dozens of nations around the world. She was named the 2008 Sustainability Pioneer by the European financial community for her 30 years of work framing the sustainability movement. She is also the Millennium TIME Magazine Hero of the Planet.

Twitter: @hlovis – Website: natcapsolutions.org

29. Jeffrey D. Sachs – Jeffrey D. Sachs is a world-renowned professor of economics, leader in sustainable development, senior UN advisor, bestselling author, and syndicated columnist whose monthly newspaper columns appear in more than 100 countries. He is the author of To Move the World: JFK’s Quest for Peace.

Twitter: @JeffDSachs – Website: jeffsachs.org

30. Jo Confino – Jo is an executive editor of the Guardian, chairman and editorial director of Guadian Sustainable Business, and advisor to Guardian Media Group.

Twitter: @joconfino – Website: http://www.theguardian.com/profile/joconfino

31. Christian Figueres – Christian is an executive secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and her passion is fighting climate change.

Twitter: @CFigueres – Website: unfccc.int

32. John Friedman – John Friedman is an award-winning communications professional and internationally recognized sustainability expert with more than 20 years of experience in internal and external communications, and a decade in corporate responsibility and sustainability. He currently works within Sodexo Corporate Responsibility Communications and is a Huffington Post blogger.

Twitter: @JohnFriedman – Website: huffingtonpost.com/john-friedman

33. Leon Kaye – Leon has over 2500 articles published on The Guardian, Triple Pundit, Inhabitat and Earth911 since 2009. He has insight on issues including environmental sustainability, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, water stewardship, and clean energy.

Twitter: @LeonKaye – Website:  greengopost.com

34. Tim Mohin – Tim is an author of Changing Business from the Inside Out. He is the director of Corporate Responsibility at AMD and has worked in CSR at Apple and Intel, and in policy at EPA and the Senate.

Twitter: @TimMohinAMD – Website: http://www.amd.com/us/aboutamd/corporate-information/corporate-responsibility/Pages/information.aspx

35. William McDonough – William is a designer, advisor, and co-author of Cradle to Cradle. He is a TIME Magazine Hero of the Planet who is changing the design of the world.

Twitter: @billmcdonough – Website: mcdonough.com

36. David Quilty – David is the founder of the daily environmental web magazine, The Good Human, and developed it into a well-respected and widely-sourced “green” brand. 

Twitter: @thegoodhuman – Website: thegoodhuman.com

37. Mike Barry – Mike is the director of Sustainable Business Marks and Spencer. He was voted Sustainable Business innovator of the year in 2011 and is leading the Plan A journey.

Twitter: @planamikebarry – Website: https://twitter.com/planamikebarry

38. Ramon Arratia – Ramon is the Sustainability Director for Interface EMEAI. He is an author of the book, Full Product Transparency and is avidly campaigning for radical sustainability.

Twitter: @RamonArratia – Website: interfacecutthefluff.com

39. Peter Gleick – Peter is the President of Pacific Institute. He is a climate/water scientist and a member of the National Academy of Science.

Twitter: @PeterGleick – Website: gleick.com

40. Sally Uren – Sally is the CEO of Forum For The Future. She is on a mission to create a sustainable future and focuses on sustainable business, sustainable food, and change.

Twitter: @sallyuren – Website: forumforthefuture.org

41. Stephanie Moram – Stephanie is an educational environmental lifestyle blogger and social media consultant. She is a freelance writer for ecosnobberysucks.com and founder and Editor-in-Chief of Good Girl Gone Green.

Twitter: @GGirlGGreen – Website:  ecosnobberysucks.com

42. Alexandra Michalko – Alexandra is a CSR/sustainability professional (currently at REI) with a decade of experience in the private and nonprofit sectors across industries. She has an MBA and a Master of Environmental Management with concentrations in strategy, environmental economics, and social entrepreneurship.

Twitter: @AlexRMichalko – Website: sustainablevalue.wordpress.com

43. Cindy Hoots – Cindy is a believer that a company’s true character is revealed by what it does when no one is watching. She is engaging stakeholders through their CSR initiative and sustainability issues.

Twitter: @ethicalbiz – Website: N/A

44. Beth Terry – Beth is attempting to live plastic-free and blogging all about it since 2007. She is advocating for the movement that we all could lead a plastic-free life.

Twitter: @PlasticfreeBeth – Website: myplasticfreelife.com

45. Steve R – Steve is all about sustainability – social responsibility, corporate and personal responsibility, energy, housing, and food and water conservation.

Twitter: @SustainablSteve – Website: N/A

46. Sarah Wechsberg – Sarah is a foodie, entrepreneur and vegan. She is passionate about sustainable business and a sustainable food system.

Twitter: @TheEcofoodie – Website: N/A

…and here are some companies to follow for supply chain management

Supply Chain Network – Supply Chain Network is a network developed to connect supply chain and logistics professionals to the people and information they need.

Twitter: @SupplyChainNtwk – Website: http://www.supplychainnetwork.com

Inbound Logistics – Inbound Logistics is an educational and supply chain resource for businesses seeking to better match demand to supply, and orient operations to support that shift.

Twitter: @ILMagazine – Website: http://www.inboundlogistics.com/cms/index.php

SupplyChainToday.com – Supply Chain Today offers social and business information relating to innovation, collaboration, and strategy.

Twitter: @SupplyChainBlog – Website: http://www.supplychaintoday.com/ 

Supply Chain Digest – Supply Chain offers supply chain related news and insights.

Twitter: @scdigest – Website: http://www.scdigest.com/

Supply Chain Management Revieve (SCMR) – SCMR is a magazine with content geared toward supply chain management professionals.

Twitter: @SCMR – Website: http://www.scmr.com/

Sustainability:

TreeHugger.com – Treehuggers shares links, ideas, and opens communication to foster conversations about all things green.

Twitter: @TreeHugger – Website: http://www.treehugger.com/

HuffPost Green – Huffington Post Green features the latest news on energy, environment, animals, and plenty more “green” content.

Twitter: @HuffPostGreen – Website: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/green/

Guardian Environment – The Guardian Environment offers green news, commentary, and more.

Twitter: @guardianeco – Website: http://www.theguardian.com/environment

Grist – Grist is an online new organization that uses humor to interpret green issues with the overall goal of inspiring environmental action.

Twitter: @grist – Website: http://grist.org/

Sustainable Business – Sustainable Business is the global voice for cutting edge sustainability comment, debate, and expert insight.

Twitter: @GuardianSustBiz – Website: http://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business

————-

See other influencer lists

 

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About Jen Cohen Crompton

Jen Cohen Crompton is a SAP Blogging Correspondent reporting on big data, cloud computing, enterprise mobility, analytics, sports and tech, and anything else innovation-related. When she's not blogging, she can be caught marketing, using social media and/or presenting at conferences around the world. Disclosure: Jen is being compensated by SAP to produce a series of articles on the innovation topics covered on this site. The opinions reflected here are her own.

Living The Live Supply Chain: Why You Need Data

Hans Thalbauer

In this post, Part 1 of this series, we explore the essentials of deploying a live supply chain. In Part 2 we’ll look at why data scientists will be increasingly key to supply chain success.

Supply chain management is both science and art, and the supply chain operations of leading retailers, consumer products companies, and other manufacturers have been honed to the highest degree.

Unfortunately, the highest degree is no longer sufficient. That’s because established processes are labor-intensive, prone to error, and too slow in providing relevant information to the systems and people who need it. Meanwhile, market dynamics – your customers, your competitors, and the business conditions that affect you – take place in real time.

The solution is to replace your established but now inadequate operations with a live supply chain.

Running on real-time data

A live supply chain runs on real-time data, or at least “right-time” data. It connects employees, partners, customers, assets, and devices. It lets you make predictions and take actions at the speed of the marketplace.

Until very recently, we didn’t have the tools to make this possible. So we made sales forecasts based on sales history – which someone once said is like driving a car forward while looking in the rearview mirror.

But today we do have the tools, and that’s changing the competitive landscape. That is to say, your competitors are actively moving toward live supply chains. And that means you have to respond. Because your competitors aren’t just becoming more efficient. They’re actually reimagining your industry – like when Uber leveraged real-time data to upend ride services.

That real-time data, and where it comes from, will vary depending on your sector. It might come from commerce networks. It might come from social media. It might come from IoT sensors. It will cover everything from how your suppliers are sourcing raw materials at one end of your supply chain to how your products are being used by customers at the other.

The quantity of data is potentially enormous. Just think of the sensors on the average delivery vehicle. You can measure tire pressure and engine performance to predict when maintenance is needed. You can monitor driver behavior to make sure delivery is safe. You can track GPS coordinates to ensure delivery is on time. You can sense the temperature of the storage unit to make sure goods remain saleable. You can track the products themselves to be sure they haven’t been tampered with.

Changing business, changing business models

All this data needs to be fed into your business systems to drive design, planning, logistics, and other operational processes in sync with changing conditions. Some of that data is structured, but much of it is unstructured. It also comes in a vast array of types; that delivery truck probably has more than 100 sensors generating data in nearly as many formats. So you need a real-time system in which you can harmonize and analyze that data.

What does that entail? You have to store it at the lowest level of granularity. You need to parse it so that you’re managing only the data you need while ignoring the data you don’t need. And you must summarize the results at the right level for each job function or stakeholder. Without investing in sophisticated systems and advanced analytics to turn data into actionable information, your supply chain won’t come close to being live.

But the payoffs of that investment include better customer insights, more accurate supply visibility, improved demand forecasts, and real-time decisions that can lead to improved profitability.

They can also lead to competitive advantage through new business models. The example we often cite at SAP is our customer Kaeser Compressor, which transformed itself from a maker of industrial air compressors into a provider of compressed air. In the past, Kaeser sold air compressors that customers had to maintain themselves. Today, the company sells compressed air produced by air compressors that Kaeser maintains for them. Customers get the compressed air they need without the hassle of managing the equipment, while Kaeser achieves higher profit margins.

But Kaeser never could have achieved that transformation without real-time data. For its new business model to be profitable, Kaeser has to ensure that its air compressors operate with the highest uptime possible. That requires smart sensors that provide real-time visibility into operating conditions to allow for preventive maintenance.

In the same way, your supply chain need to capture, analyze, and act on real-timed data. It’s what will make your supply chain live. And what will help your new business models come to life.

Learn more about how running a live supply chain can help you thrive today and innovate for tomorrow at SAP.com.

This story originally appeared on EBN

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Hans Thalbauer

About Hans Thalbauer

Hans Thalbauer is the Senior Vice President, Extended Supply Chain, at SAP. He is responsible for the strategic direction and the Go-To-Market of solutions for Supply Chain, Logistics, Engineering/R&D, Manufacturing, Asset Management and Sustainability at SAP.

Free Shipping In A Changing World: The Uncomfortable Truth

Adam Winfield

We can’t say for sure what the future holds for our cities and towns—how they’ll look and how they’ll function—but it’s fairly safe to assume investment priorities will move further away from public buildings and towards transportation, warehousing, and digital connectivity.

The advance of technology is having dramatic knock-on effects on the political, social, and economic landscapes. For example, the concept of traveling to acquire goods to bring home—a practice that essentially goes back to our hunter-gatherer days—is being flipped on its head.

Our desire for buildings that house consumer products is waning, and our reliance on data, delivery, and Internet connectivity is deepening. Amazon’s 45-foot-long “Snowmobile” shipping truck, which carries up to 100 million gigabytes of data to enable what would otherwise be a decades-long Internet transfer to be done in weeks, is a novel example of this change.

Trucks full of data aren’t the only thing on Amazon’s mind. The company seems to be gearing up to take on the entire logistics industry in response to shipping companies raising their prices. It’s not unthinkable that Amazon could soon “Uberize”’ the logistics industry.

It’s no secret that Amazon has already had a huge influence on how logistics has evolved in the digital age. The company has played the biggest role in replacing shops for warehouses, and its Amazon Prime service has now firmly normalized the concept of free shipping in the minds of consumers.

As a result of the free shipping precedent it set, Amazon recovers only about 55% of the amount it spends on shipping (equating to a $1.75 billion loss in Q3, though the company more than makes up for this with profits in other areas).

With drones, driverless cars, and home deliveries set to become the norm, it looks as though logistics could become the centerpiece in future business plans, at least for retailers. One of the biggest questions for decision makers will be “We’re not Amazon—how can we compete and run sustainably when we’re making no returns on our shipping costs?”

Maybe that’s a question those businesses shouldn’t have to answer. If there was a cultural shift to citizens accepting paid shipping as an everyday cost, much like they accept the cost of gas to get to a store, would the problem disappear?

The only alternatives appear to be discreetly folding shipping into the price of products or allowing Amazon to monopolize retail commerce while AWS forever soaks up the losses it makes on shipping.

Arguing this point, Fast Company’s Neal Ungerleider wrote an excellent piece titled Free Shipping Is A Lie:

Like virtually everything else, “free” shipping is not actually free. The biggest impact is felt by e-commerce businesses, particularly smaller ones, which face what some have called an emerging crisis: The cost of free shipping, in many cases, is unsustainable.

Jerry Storch, CEO of Hudson’s Bay Company, had this to say on the matter: “Direct-to-home has a supply chain cost three times higher than a store-based model. So when we say the Internet retailer can charge less, how can that be? Maybe this is why so many of us have so much trouble emulating Amazon’s model and making any money. It’s because it’s really expensive and it’s also why Amazon’s had trouble making money on merchandising sales.”

Going back to the Fast Company article, Ungerleider writes:

“The Amazon Effect” [is] a massive growth in shipping caused by Amazon and its customers’ behavior. It highlight[s]…Amazon’s ability to let customers purchase small add-on items without additional shipping charges when ordering more expensive items. Even though the items may be small, they add up to a massive amount of shipping material, physical space occupied, and gasoline and worker hours spent bringing them from Point A to Point B.

With this in mind, what does the future hold for shipping when people increasingly choose home deliveries over in-store shopping but don’t want to pay for the goods to be delivered? Whatever Amazon does, it’s up to retail businesses to prepare for this looming reality and put logistics front of mind. Like many things these days, digital technology, data and advanced machinery will likely provide the answers, but for most retailers this is beginning of a long road ahead.

Adrian Gonzalez, logistics thought leader, explains how businesses can put transportation of goods centre stage in their digital business plans. Listen here.

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About Adam Winfield

Adam Winfield writes about technology, how it's affecting industries, how it's affecting businesses, and how it's affecting people.

3 Ways Robots Will Co-Evolve with Humans

Christopher Koch

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About Christopher Koch

Christopher Koch is the Editorial Director of the SAP Center for Business Insight. He is an experienced publishing professional, researcher, editor, and writer in business, technology, and B2B marketing. Share your thoughts with Chris on Twitter @Ckochster.

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Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Hans Thalbauer

About Hans Thalbauer

Hans Thalbauer is the Senior Vice President, Extended Supply Chain, at SAP. He is responsible for the strategic direction and the Go-To-Market of solutions for Supply Chain, Logistics, Engineering/R&D, Manufacturing, Asset Management and Sustainability at SAP.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Melissa Friedman

About Melissa Friedman

Melissa Friedman is a senior marketing manager of Global Partner Operations at SAP. She manages SAP Virtual Agency, a multi-language, online demand-generation platform for SAP partners. In her spare time, Melissa is a professional photographer who specializes in wedding, bar/bat mitzvah, and portrait photography. Follow Melissa on Twitter and LinkedIn, or view her photography work.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

About Adam Winfield

Adam Winfield writes about technology, how it's affecting industries, how it's affecting businesses, and how it's affecting people.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Gavin Mooney

About Gavin Mooney

Gavin Mooney is a utilities industry solution specialist for SAP. From a background in Engineering and IT, Gavin has been working in the utilities industry with SAP products for nearly 15 years. He has had the privilege of working with a number of Electricity, Gas and Water Utilities across the globe to implement SAP’s Industry Solution for Utilities. He now works with utilities to help them identify the best way to run simple and run better with SAP's latest products. Gavin loves to network and build lasting business relationships and is passionate about cleantech and the fundamental transformation currently shaking up the utilities industry.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Kris Hansen

About Kris Hansen

Kris Hansen is senior principal, Financial Services for SAP Canada. He is focused on understanding the financial services industry and identifying new and interesting digital opportunities that create disruptive business value.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

About Wilson Zhu

Wilson Zhu is a Marketing Manager at SAP. He focuses on the topic of Digital Supply Chain and IoT. Follow him on Twitter: @thezhu.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Roger Noia

About Roger Noia

Roger Noia is the director of Solution Marketing, SAP Jam Collaboration, at SAP. He is responsible for product marketing and sales enablement for our dedicated sales team as well as the broader SAP sales force selling SAP Jam.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Drew Schiller

About Drew Schiller

Drew Schiller co-founded and serves as the Chief Executive Officer of Validic, the leading digital health platform for connecting patient-generated data from apps, wearables, and in-home medical devices to the healthcare system. At Validic, Drew leads the corporate strategy, drives key day-to-day initiatives, and works closely with senior executives at partner organizations to stay ahead of the innovation curve.

Tags:

awareness