Five Real Business Uses Of The Internet Of Things

Paul Clark

Exciting as the topic is, many of us struggle to articulate real business applications that the Internet of Things (IoT) can be used for. What we need are a few simple, memorable examples, and recently I’ve been collecting a few of these across different industries. I’ve tried to lay them out here without all the usual technical speak that usually accompanies them. I’d love to hear more. Please add them in the comments below!

Retail: Clearing the shelves

The retail industry has made great strides in optimizing stock and avoiding waste, but it continues to explore ways of improving further. The latest case I came across was using the IoT to shift aging inventory. By combining knowledge of what’s on the shelves and who’s in the store, it’s now possible to push personalized promotions to shoppers who are walking in the aisles where products need to be shifted. With deeper knowledge of the customers’ individual preferences, such promotions can be made even more effective.

Remote workers: Keeping them mobile

Any small business that depends on the reliability of its vehicles knows the cost of breakdowns (money, time, customer satisfaction, etc.) But what if you have thousands or tens of thousands of vehicles out in the field? How do you stay on top of those? The IoT can be used to monitor huge numbers of industrial vehicles in real time. By permanently tracking performance, problems can be anticipated and the cost of down-time avoided. What’s more, creative business models are also surfacing that will enable companies to make extra money by using the data to cross-sell and up-sell services through the customer service organization.

Oil and gas: Small improvements = Big bucks

When you’re running equipment as big as an oil rig or pipeline, the cost of unscheduled downtime can run into the millions of dollars. To reduce it to a minimum you need to not only constantly monitor every component, but also have a super-fast way to anticipate and respond to parts failure. Connecting machine monitoring back to supply chain and repair systems can lead to massive cost savings by predicting when repairs will be needed and triggering the parts and personnel to carry them out before failures occur.

Airlines: Keep that plane in the air

Keeping aircraft engines running smoothly is not only a safety matter – although that must be the primary consideration – it’s also the way to get the most out of planes that cost hundreds of millions of dollars each. The IoT is helping manufacturers continuously monitor aircraft engines and all their components using real-time predictive analytics. As a result, they can determine the remaining useful life of the engine, predict the time to parts failure, and keep planes safely in the air.

Public safety: Beating the car thieves

Many cities and their police forces are looking to the IoT to help them get smarter and stay ahead of criminals. By combining video cameras and analytics it is now possible to automatically monitor huge amounts of video “data.” This in turn can be combined with existing information the police have on missing vehicles and crime hot spots to help prevent car theft and identify stolen cars.

All of these topics and more will be covered in more detail in the upcoming SAPPHIRE NOW, on May 14-16 in Orlando. Come and check them out!

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About Paul Clark

Paul Clark is the Senior Director of Technology Partner Marketing at SAP. He is responsible for developing and executing partner marketing strategies, activities, and programs in joint go-to-market plans with global technology partners. The goal is to increase opportunities, pipeline, and revenue through demand generation via SAP's global and local partner ecosystems.

Digitalist Flash Briefing: What Powers The World’s First Green Cargo System In Switzerland? The IoT

Bonnie D. Graham

Today’s briefing takes us to Switzerland where plans are underway for a greener, more efficient future – powered by the Internet of Things.

  • Amazon Echo or Dot: Enable the “Digitalist” flash briefing skill, and ask Alexa to “play my flash briefings” on every business day.
  • Alexa on a mobile device:
    • Download the Amazon Alexa app: Select Skills, and search “Digitalist”. Then, select Digitalist, and click on the Enable button.
    • Download the Amazon app: Click on the microphone icon and say “Play my flash briefing.”

Find and listen to previous Flash Briefings on Digitalistmag.com.

Read more on today’s topic

 

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About Bonnie D. Graham

Bonnie D. Graham is the creator, producer and host/moderator of 29 Game-Changers Radio series presented by SAP, bringing technology and business strategy thought leadership panel discussions to a global audience via the Business Channel on World Talk Radio. A broadcast journalist with nearly 20 years in media production and hosting, Bonnie has held marketing communications management roles in the business software, financial services, and real estate industries. She calls SAP Radio her "dream job". Listen to Coffee Break with Game-Changers.

How IoT And Connected Vehicles Are Redefining Fleet Management

John Ward

For years now, we have been hearing – and, in many cases, learning firsthand – how connected cars are changing the everyday lives of individual car owners.

But what about the impact on those folks who own dozens, or even thousands, of vehicles? What do connected vehicles mean to them?

ARI has a special perspective on this subject. As the largest privately held fleet-management company in the world, ARI currently manages more than 1.4 million vehicles around the globe. Its goal is to help customers control the total cost of ownership of fleets that can include light, medium, and heavy duty trucks, as well as cars.

It’s clear that ARI believes the combination of IoT technologies and network connectivity are driving advancements in fleet management that involve both car and driver.

Under the hood

In fleet management, it starts with capitalizing on all the data that a modern fleet generates. Connected cars can crank out up to 25 gigabytes of data per hour.

“We help our customers make educated decisions about their fleets by translating data points into actual strategies,” says Majk Strika, the managing director for ARI Fleet Europe.

ARI officials explain that telematics are already an integral part of more than 100,000 of the vehicles the company manages – and that number is growing rapidly. As a result, ARI processes more than a terabyte of telematics on a monthly basis.

“With vehicles that have telematics and IoT capabilities, we are really seeing inside that vehicle,” says Bill Powell, director of enterprise architecture at ARI. “When we take our fleet management information and analyze that together with IoT information, patterns begin to emerge.”

ARI is using technologies like an in-memory computing platform and digital innovation system to drive this insight to the company’s call center. Here, more than 400 ASE-certified technicians rely on this information to make decisions affecting critical issues like vehicle maintenance and repair, warranty protection, and driver safety for their clients.

Behind the wheel

“But the Holy Grail is figuring out what’s going on behind the wheel,” Powell says, “interacting and connecting with that driver.”

His colleagues agree. “There’s a lot of information we can get around driver safety and driver behavior,” notes ARI’s senior vice president of European operations, Mark Bryan, in a video filmed at a recent SAP Leonardo Live event.

And providing drivers with real-time information can promote behavior that results in cost savings. Bryan describes a common scenario where GPS data combined with information about local gas prices can direct drivers to the lowest-cost fuel provider.

“That’s a simple example,” says Bryan. “But fuel is the largest part of our clients’ spend. Consider the potential impact if you can continually provide that information to 2,000 drivers.”

So where can you see technologies like IoT, network connectivity, and advanced analytics at work in fleet management?

The short answer is, under the hood and behind the wheel.

Join us at SAP Leonardo Live North America in Chicago, November 2-3, 2017.

Please follow me on Twitter @JohnGWard3.

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About John Ward

John Ward is an Integrated Marketing Expert at SAP. He has over 30 years of professional writing experience that includes marketing material, sales support, technical documentation, video scripting, and magazine articles.

Diving Deep Into Digital Experiences

Kai Goerlich

 

Google Cardboard VR goggles cost US$8
By 2019, immersive solutions
will be adopted in 20% of enterprise businesses
By 2025, the market for immersive hardware and software technology could be $182 billion
In 2017, Lowe’s launched
Holoroom How To VR DIY clinics

Link to Sources


From Dipping a Toe to Fully Immersed

The first wave of virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) is here,

using smartphones, glasses, and goggles to place us in the middle of 360-degree digital environments or overlay digital artifacts on the physical world. Prototypes, pilot projects, and first movers have already emerged:

  • Guiding warehouse pickers, cargo loaders, and truck drivers with AR
  • Overlaying constantly updated blueprints, measurements, and other construction data on building sites in real time with AR
  • Building 3D machine prototypes in VR for virtual testing and maintenance planning
  • Exhibiting new appliances and fixtures in a VR mockup of the customer’s home
  • Teaching medicine with AR tools that overlay diagnostics and instructions on patients’ bodies

A Vast Sea of Possibilities

Immersive technologies leapt forward in spring 2017 with the introduction of three new products:

  • Nvidia’s Project Holodeck, which generates shared photorealistic VR environments
  • A cloud-based platform for industrial AR from Lenovo New Vision AR and Wikitude
  • A workspace and headset from Meta that lets users use their hands to interact with AR artifacts

The Truly Digital Workplace

New immersive experiences won’t simply be new tools for existing tasks. They promise to create entirely new ways of working.

VR avatars that look and sound like their owners will soon be able to meet in realistic virtual meeting spaces without requiring users to leave their desks or even their homes. With enough computing power and a smart-enough AI, we could soon let VR avatars act as our proxies while we’re doing other things—and (theoretically) do it well enough that no one can tell the difference.

We’ll need a way to signal when an avatar is being human driven in real time, when it’s on autopilot, and when it’s owned by a bot.


What Is Immersion?

A completely immersive experience that’s indistinguishable from real life is impossible given the current constraints on power, throughput, and battery life.

To make current digital experiences more convincing, we’ll need interactive sensors in objects and materials, more powerful infrastructure to create realistic images, and smarter interfaces to interpret and interact with data.

When everything around us is intelligent and interactive, every environment could have an AR overlay or VR presence, with use cases ranging from gaming to firefighting.

We could see a backlash touting the superiority of the unmediated physical world—but multisensory immersive experiences that we can navigate in 360-degree space will change what we consider “real.”


Download the executive brief Diving Deep Into Digital Experiences.


Read the full article Swimming in the Immersive Digital Experience.

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Kai Goerlich

About Kai Goerlich

Kai Goerlich is the Chief Futurist at SAP Innovation Center network His specialties include Competitive Intelligence, Market Intelligence, Corporate Foresight, Trends, Futuring and ideation. Share your thoughts with Kai on Twitter @KaiGoe.heif Futu

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Blockchain: Thoughts On The "Next Big Thing"

Ross Doherty

Many people associate blockchain with bitcoin—which is, at least for today, the most common application to leverage blockchain. However, when you dig a little deeper and consider the core concepts of blockchain—distribution, consensus achieved by algorithm rather than opinion, cryptographically secure, private—you start to think about how these aspects can be applied, both technically and strategically, to solve problems simple and  complex. Blockchain is neither a product nor a system – instead, it is a concept.

Blockchain applications disrupt conventional thinking and conventional approaches regarding data processing, handling, and storage. First we had the “move to the cloud,” and many were cautious and even frightened of what it meant to move their systems, infrastructure, and data to a platform outside their organization’s four walls. Compound this with blockchain in its purest form—a distributed and possibly shared resource—and you can see why many may be reluctant.

My sentiment, however, is a little different. Creating a solid basis that harnesses the concepts of blockchain with sufficient thought leadership and knowledge-sharing, along with a pragmatic and open-minded approach to problem-solving, can lead to innovative and disruptive outcomes and solid solutions for customers. Blockchain should not be feared, but rather rationalized and demystified, with the goal of making it someday as ubiquitous as the cloud. Blockchain should not be pigeonholed into a specific industry or use case—it is much more that, and it should be much more than that.

Grounding ourselves momentarily, allow me to relay some ideas from both within the enterprise and customers regarding possible use cases for blockchain technology: From placing blockchain at the core of business networks for traceability and auditability, to a way for ordinary people to easily and cheaply post a document as part of a patent process; a way to counteract bootlegging and counterfeiting in commodity supply chain, a way to add an additional layer of security to simple email exchange; from electronic voting systems through to medial record storage. The beauty of blockchain is that its application can scale as big as your imagination allows.

Blockchain is not the staple of the corporate, nor is it limited to grand and expansive development teams—most of the technology is open source, public, and tangible to everyone. It is not an exclusive or expert concept, prohibitive in terms of cost or resource. Blockchain is a new frontier, largely unmined and full of opportunity.

In closing, I invite you to invest some time to do what I did when I first encountered the concept and needed to better understand it. Plug “Blockchain explained simply” (or words to that effect) into your preferred search engine. Find the article that best speaks to you—there are plenty online. Once you get it (and I promise you will) and experience your “eureka!” moment, start to think how blockchain and its concepts might help you solve a business or technical problem.

For more insight on blockchain, see Blockchain’s Value Underestimated, Despite The Hype.

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Ross Doherty

About Ross Doherty

Ross Doherty is a manager in the SAP Innovative Business Solutions team, based in Galway, Ireland. Ross’s team’s focus is in the domain of Business Networks and Innovation. Ross is proud to lead a talented and diverse team of pre-sales, integration, quality management, user assistance and solution architects, and to be serving SAP for almost 4 years.