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How Quickly Are Industries Adopting the Internet of Things?

Kai Goerlich

Science fiction writer William Gibson is credited with saying, ”The future is already here—it’s just not evenly distributed.” Such is the case with the Internet of Things (IoT).

Digital business requires both data and the equipment to capture, store, manage, and analyze that data before enterprises can better inform their decisions, automate actions, and improve operations. IoT technology provides a way.

According to IDC, companies are ramping up their IoT investments rapidly, which can be seen in seven major industries with high levels of physical products or assets. Overall, the market research firm forecasts that IoT spending will increase 19% on average through 2018. Some industries, such as discrete manufacturing, have already invested significantly; others, such as healthcare, have spent less to date but are expected to expand quickly in the future.

Opportunities for Connection

The IoT is poised for rapid growth across a wide variety of industries that are connecting physical assets 2016_Q1_charted_09
Download the infographic here.

The IoT Creates New Revenue Models

The Internet of Things represents a new course for automation and data-enabled decision making. Companies can use data collected from sensors on machines to create new business processes and revenue models.

It’s no wonder the numbers that researchers at Gartner cite—6.4 billion connected things in use in 2016, an increase of 30% over 2015—sound both large (billions, up 30%) and small at the same time (we’re just getting started). The future is being distributed unevenly, but it will reach just about everywhere, eventually.

2016_Q1_charted_02Utilities

Utilities are still in the early stages of connecting their physical assets, a McKinsey Global Institute analysis finds. Deregulation and new market entrants are expected to prompt greater investments in the future. For example, smart metering systems and renewable energy sources, both growing activities in this industry, require IoT connections.

And to compete, utilities will need to invest in systems that monitor and analyze data from smart devices at homes and businesses, Tata Consultancy Services notes. IDC predicts that eventually this industry will see a high impact from its IoT investments because both utility companies and consumers have a stake in making energy production and use more efficient.

2016_Q1_charted_03Healthcare

The industry as a whole has been slowed by regulatory and privacy concerns, Tata Consultancy Services research finds. But as healthcare providers install more equipment to connect medical devices to networks, they, too, will adopt more data-driven devices. Ultimately, IDC suggests that the IoT will have a high impact through monitoring applications and sensors that enable patients to manage their health and fitness.

2016_Q1_charted_04Wholesale

The IoT promises to bring new capabilities to distributors, including new opportunities to sell goods through industrial vending machines and automated transportation systems. However, the industry as a whole has been what McKinsey Global Institute calls a medium-level player on
the road to digitization.

 

2016_Q1_charted_05Discrete Manufacturing

Companies ranging from consumer goods makers to industrial manufacturers are applying IoT investments to monitor production and the flow of goods. Sensors enable predictive applications to schedule maintenance for jet engines, for example. And consumer goods makers are starting to experiment with marketing applications enabled by machine sensors and smartphones, Tata Consultancy Services notes.

2016_Q1_charted_06Retail

As VDC Research Group points out, the drive to digitize business has been going on since well before 2013. Prices for RFID transponders have dipped over the past decade, which has enabled retailers to affix tags to goods, speeding up inventory tracking and shipments processing and reducing shrinkage, RFID Journal reports.

 

2016_Q1_charted_07Logistics

Logistics firm DHL and networking vendor Cisco predict that there will be 50 billion connected devices by 2020, while making the point that this “represents only a tiny fraction of what could be connected—something on the order of 3% of all connectable things.” The resulting connectivity will reshape how decisions are made about the way goods are stored, monitored, serviced, and delivered. According to IDC, the IoT will have a high impact on the logistics industry because the benefits are clear and easy to measure.

2016_Q1_charted_08Process Manufacturing

Companies in process industries have been heavy investors in technologies that make their assets more productive, including enterprise resource planning and supply chain management software. Leading players see the IoT as a way to extend the value of these investments. For example, Deloitte researchers note that oil and gas companies can wring more efficiency from resource processing and distribution by collecting and analyzing data from sensors and by monitoring equipment to reduce unplanned equipment outages.

By Michael S. Goldberg and Kai Goerlich

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Kai Goerlich

About Kai Goerlich

Kai Goerlich is the Idea Director of Thought Leadership at SAP. His specialties include Competitive Intelligence, Market Intelligence, Corporate Foresight, Trends, Futuring and ideation.

IoT Can Keep You Healthy — Even When You Sleep [VIDEO]

Christine Donato

Today the Internet of Things is revamping technology. IoT image from American Geniuses.jpg

Smart devices speak to each other and work together to provide the end user with a better product experience.

Coinciding with this change in technology is a change in people. We’ve transitioned from a world of people who love processed foods and french fries to people who eat kale chips and Greek yogurt…and actually like it.

People are taking ownership of their well-being, and preventative care is at the forefront of focus for both physicians and patients. Fitness trackers alert wearers of the exact number of calories burned from walking a certain number of steps. Mobile apps calculate our perfect nutritional balance. And even while we sleep, people are realizing that it’s important to monitor vitals.

According to research conducted at Harvard University, proper sleep patterns bolster healthy side effects such as improved immune function, a faster metabolism, preserved memory, and reduced stress and depression.

Conversely, the Harvard study determined that lack of sleep can negatively affect judgement, mood, and the ability retain information, as well as increase the risk of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and even premature death.

Through the Internet of Things, researchers can now explore sleep patterns without the usual sleep labs and movement-restricting electrode wires. And with connected devices, individuals can now easily monitor and positively influence their own health.

EarlySense, a startup credited with the creation of continuous patient monitoring solutions focused on early detection of patient deterioration, mid-sleep falls, and pressure ulcers, began with a mission to prevent premature and preventable deaths.

Without constant monitoring, patients with unexpected clinical deterioration may be accidentally neglected, and their conditions can easily escalate into emergency situations.

Motivated by many instances of patients who died from preventable post-elective surgery complications, EarlySense founders created a product that constantly monitors patients when hospital nurses can’t, alerting the main nurse station when a patient leaves his or her bed and could potentially fall, or when a patient’s vital signs drop or rise unexpectedly.

Now EarlySense technology has expanded outside of the hospital realm. The EarlySense wellness sensor, a device connected via the Internet of Things, mobile solutions, and supported by SAP HANA Cloud Platform, monitors all vital signs while a person sleeps. The device is completely wireless and lies subtly underneath one’s mattress. The sensor collects all mechanical vibrations that the patient’s body emits while sleeping, continuously monitoring heart and respiratory rates.

Watch this short video to learn more about how the EarlySense wellness sensor works:

The result is faster diagnoses with better treatments and outcomes. Sleep issues can be identified and addressed; individuals can use the data collected to make adjustments in diet or exercise habits; and those on heavy pain medications can monitor the way their bodies react to the medication. In addition, physicians can use the data collected from the sensor to identify patient health problems before they escalate into an emergency situation.

Connected care is opening the door for a new way to practice health. Through connected care apps that link people with their doctors, fitness trackers that measure daily activity, and sensors like the EarlySense wellness sensor, today’s technology enables people and physicians to work together to prevent sickness and accidents before they occur. Technology is forever changing the way we live, and in turn we are living longer, healthier lives.

To learn how SAP HANA Cloud Platform can affect your business, visit It&Me.

For more stories, join me on Twitter.

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Christine Donato

About Christine Donato

Christine Donato is a Senior Integrated Marketing Specialist at SAP. She is an accomplished project manager and leader of multiple marketing and sales enablement campaigns and events, that supported a multi million euro business.

Size Doesn't Matter For Businesses In The Digital Economy

Christine Donato

SAP_Talks_Banner_2When I first entered the job market, I interviewed at a few different companies, one of which was a small insurance firm outside Philadelphia. My interviewer was a C-level executive, and he gave me a piece of advice I’ll never forget. He said, “You know, at a large corporation, you’re going to learn a lot about a little. Here with us, at a small business, you will learn a lot about a lot.”

He meant, of course, that employees of small to mid-sized companies wear many hats.  And usually, their organizational leaders are accessible resources and serve as CEO, CMO, CIO, CFO, and more all at one time.

Size doesn’t matter

Today, small businesses can be just as successful as, if not more successful than, their larger competitors. Why? Because with the right technology, small businesses can easily cause positive disruption in the market.

Within the boom of the digital economy, small businesses now have the power to reshape their markets and industries. A couple popular examples of this are Uber disrupting the transportation industry and Airbnb disrupting the hospitality industry.

Both have significantly shaken their larger competitors because they are successfully leveraging the Internet of Things to provide customers with a simple and easy way to purchase a service. And according to a recent blog by Vivek Bapat, 70% of consumers will recommend brands that offer a simpler experience.  And 38% of consumers will pay a premium for it (The Digitalist).

Learn more… Listen to #SAPTalks

According to a recent Economist Intelligence Unit study, 59% of executives agree that in order for their businesses to survive with today’s customers, their businesses must embrace and adapt to hyperconnectivity.

To learn more about numerous small and mid-sized businesses that are ditching legacy processes and inside-the box thinking to become disruptive forces in their markets, check out the new podcast series, #SAPTalks…Small to Midsized Business, hosted by David Trites.

In about 20 minutes per episode, guest speakers from small and mid-sized companies share their unscripted and in-depth digital transformation experiences. They explain their industries, challenges, current technology projects, best practices, and lessons learned along the journey.

The first episode will air on the Voice America Channel on Tuesday October 13th and will feature Paula Muesse, CIO and CFO of Zhena’s Gypsy Tea. On the show, Paula will explain how Zhena’s adopted new technology to best sell organic, fair-trade, and competitive teas.

You can follow the conversation on Twitter by hash tagging #SAPTalks and by following @SAPSmallBiz.

Follow the blog series

Read about more companies that have broken the myth that SAP is only for big business:

How to be a World-Leading Publisher in a Digital World

Franklin Valve Shows How Small Business Tackles Rapid Growth

Who is Feeding China’s Half Billion Pigs?

How Prime Meats Cuts Through Business Complexity

High-Tech ERP Helps EvoShield Protect Athletes and Grow Business

Stick to Basics in Family Recipes and the Sausage Business

For more on how you can successfully sell into the small and mid-sized market, please click here.

For more stories, follow me on Twitter and LinkedIn.

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Christine Donato

About Christine Donato

Christine Donato is a Senior Integrated Marketing Specialist at SAP. She is an accomplished project manager and leader of multiple marketing and sales enablement campaigns and events, that supported a multi million euro business.

How Much Will Digital Cannibalization Eat into Your Business?

Fawn Fitter

Former Cisco CEO John Chambers predicts that 40% of companies will crumble when they fail to complete a successful digital transformation.

These legacy companies may be trying to keep up with insurgent companies that are introducing disruptive technologies, but they’re being held back by the ease of doing business the way they always have – or by how vehemently their customers object to change.

Most organizations today know that they have to embrace innovation. The question is whether they can put a digital business model in place without damaging their existing business so badly that they don’t survive the transition. We gathered a panel of experts to discuss the fine line between disruption and destruction.

SAP_Disruption_QA_images2400x1600_3

qa_qIn 2011, when Netflix hiked prices and tried to split its streaming and DVD-bymail services, it lost 3.25% of its customer base and 75% of its market capitalization.²︐³ What can we learn from that?

Scott Anthony: That debacle shows that sometimes you can get ahead of your customers. The key is to manage things at the pace of the market, not at your internal speed. You need to know what your customers are looking for and what they’re willing to tolerate. Sometimes companies forget what their customers want and care about, and they try to push things on them before they’re ready.

R. “Ray” Wang: You need to be able to split your traditional business and your growth business so that you can focus on big shifts instead of moving the needle 2%. Netflix was responding to its customers – by deciding not to define its brand too narrowly.

qa_qDoes disruption always involve cannibalizing your own business?

Wang: You can’t design new experiences in existing systems. But you have to make sure you manage the revenue stream on the way down in the old business model while managing the growth of the new one.

Merijn Helle: Traditional brick-and-mortar stores are putting a lot of capital into digital initiatives that aren’t paying enough back yet in the form of online sales, and they’re cannibalizing their profits so they can deliver a single authentic experience. Customers don’t see channels, they see brands; and they want to interact with brands seamlessly in real time, regardless of channel or format.

Lars Bastian: In manufacturing, new technologies aren’t about disrupting your business model as much as they are about expanding it. Think about predictive maintenance, the ability to warn customers when the product they’ve purchased will need service. You’re not going to lose customers by introducing new processes. You have to add these digitized services to remain competitive.

qa_qIs cannibalizing your own business better or worse than losing market share to a more innovative competitor?

Michael Liebhold: You have to create that digital business and mandate it to grow. If you cannibalize the existing business, that’s just the price you have to pay.

Wang: Companies that cannibalize their own businesses are the ones that survive. If you don’t do it, someone else will. What we’re really talking about is “Why do you exist? Why does anyone want to buy from you?”

Anthony: I’m not sure that’s the right question. The fundamental question is what you’re using disruption to do. How do you use it to strengthen what you’re doing today, and what new things does it enable? I think you can get so consumed with all the changes that reconfigure what you’re doing today that you do only that. And if you do only that, your business becomes smaller, less significant, and less interesting.

qa_qSo how should companies think about smart disruption?

Anthony: Leaders have to reconfigure today and imagine tomorrow at the same time. It’s not either/or. Every disruptive threat has an equal, if not greater, opportunity. When disruption strikes, it’s a mistake only to feel the threat to your legacy business. It’s an opportunity to expand into a different marke.

SAP_Disruption_QA_images2400x1600_4Liebhold: It starts at the top. You can’t ask a CEO for an eight-figure budget to upgrade a cloud analytics system if the C-suite doesn’t understand the power of integrating data from across all the legacy systems. So the first task is to educate the senior team so it can approve the budgets.

Scott Underwood: Some of the most interesting questions are internal organizational questions, keeping people from feeling that their livelihoods are in danger or introducing ways to keep them engaged.

Leon Segal: Absolutely. If you want to enter a new market or introduce a new product, there’s a whole chain of stakeholders – including your own employees and the distribution chain. Their experiences are also new. Once you start looking for things that affect their experience, you can’t help doing it. You walk around the office and say, “That doesn’t look right, they don’t look happy. Maybe we should change that around.”

Fawn Fitter is a freelance writer specializing in business and technology. 

To learn more about how to disrupt your business without destroying it, read the in-depth report Digital Disruption: When to Cook the Golden Goose.

Download the PDF (1.2MB)

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