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3 Keys For Architecting Your Platform For Growth Successfully

Stephanie Peterson

car on a bridge representing a real-time platformJust think about it: How often do you try to fast-forward through the merciless number of television ads that disrupt your favorite shows? More often than not is what we can assume. However, on seldom occasions, an ad may seem to speak to you. In those moments, you watch with attention, taking in that feeling of human connection.

Every company wants to make these types of connections with its consumers, and guess who is expected to make it happen? That’s right – IT. It’s IT’s job to serve up relevant data to your business users so that they can quickly digest and transform the information into winning strategies. Using a platform that brings together transactions and analytics and links together systems for an integrated, secure path forward will enable your company to compete in real time and capitalize on big business opportunities.

Get ready for your date with data

One of the mistakes when entering into any relationship with data is to move forward without having a sound foundation in place. First, you must carefully consider all the things you and your company expect to get out of data, and make sure your platform can support your strategic goals.

The mobile devices and apps, cloud services, Big Data analytics, and social technologies that shape the “Platform” must all be considered. Each is a critical driver in a digital strategy that best leverages today’s booming technologies.

It’s on IT’s shoulders to make sense of the data overload that exists in this 3rd Platform marketplace. The better you can understand and represent the data, the better you’ll be able to provide meaningful insights to your company. But before you’re able to do any of that, you must first have easy access to that data. Developing an infrastructure that can link systems and bring transactional and analytical data processes together on one platform enables you to quickly provide deep insights into your company’s structured and unstructured data.

The conversation has officially changed

Let’s face it – data is only going to keep growing. The International Data Corporation (IDC) expects we’ll reach 6 trillion terabytes in 2014. No one’s talking about whether data analytics is critical anymore; we all know it to be true. And, we’ll see the same shift in thought with integrated systems. The combination of Platform as a Service (PaaS) opportunities and in-memory analytic capabilities creates a powerful force for competitive advantages.

It’s important that you ask the hard questions and find the right technology partners, because so many companies get stuck with expensive technology that doesn’t actually meet specifications. When this happens, IT is often blamed.

Don’t let that be you! As the role of IT evolves, here are three essentials needed in a strong platform that will enable IT take ownership of its new responsibilities:

  • Safe connections: Workforces want to go mobile, and access and create data from any location and any device at any time. But, you also want to make sure you don’t have to worry about stolen computer equipment or sharing expensive storage capacity with others. Your data can still remain safe behind the firewall you built, if you are careful. Of course, you must also make sure you’re up-to-date on virus protection and internal security precautions.
  • One source of truth: Data is often spread across a multitude of siloed applications and systems throughout the organization. With employees working off bits and pieces – rather than a complete data set – you risk decisions and strategies that are built around inconsistent versions of the truth. In-memory platforms can help ensure that everyone operates off a single, consistent view of your data.
  • Stop waiting for data insights: Business analysts can spend 90% of their day running queries instead of actually analyzing data for insights to be used throughout the organization. In all the noise, many are unaware that queries don’t have to take days or hours – some can be completed in seconds! The ability to improve your performance through rapid data processing should not be overlooked.

It’s up to you to align the people, processes, and technology by shifting how you think about your job as an enabler to one that empowers your business users. It can all begin by laying the proper technological foundation for your business.

For more tips on where to focus your IT efforts and 2014 technology trends, download the IDC white paper, IDC Predictions 2014: Battles for Dominance – and Survival – on the 3rd Platform.

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Stephanie Peterson

About Stephanie Peterson

Stephanie Peterson is the Director, Brand to Demand, Digital Enterprise Platform Marketing, at SAP. In this role, she leads the company’s North America marketing campaigns for data and data management, a part of the digital enterprise platform. Her primary responsibility is determining the ideal tactic mix and budget spend across the portfolio to drive demand and generate pipeline within IT and other LOBs.

The Future Of Supplier Collaboration: 9 Things CPOs Want Their Managers To Know Now

Sundar Kamak

As a sourcing or procurement manager, you may think there’s nothing new about supplier collaboration. Your chief procurement officer (CPO) most likely disagrees.
Forward-thinking CPOs acknowledge the benefit of supplier partnerships. They not only value collaboration, but require a revolution in how their buying organization conducts its business and operations. “Procurement must start looking to suppliers for inspiration and new capability, stop prescribing specifications and start tapping into the expertise of suppliers,” writes David Rae in Procurement Leaders. The CEO expects it of your CPO, and your CPO expects it of you. For sourcing managers, this can be a lot of pressure.

Here are nine things your CPO wants you to know about how supplier collaboration is changing – and why it matters to your company’s future and your own future.

1. The need for supplier collaboration in procurement is greater than ever

Over half (65%) of procurement practitioners say procurement at their company is becoming more collaborative with suppliers, according to The Future of Procurement, Making Collaboration Pay Off, by Oxford Economics. Why? Because the pace of business has increased exponentially, and businesses must be able to respond to new market demands with agility and innovation. In this climate, buyers are relying on suppliers more than ever before. And buyers aren’t collaborating with suppliers merely as providers of materials and goods, but as strategic partners that can help create products that are competitive differentiators.

Supplier collaboration itself isn’t new. What’s new is that it’s taken on a much greater urgency and importance.

2. You’re probably not realizing the full collective power of your supplier relationships

Supplier collaboration has always been a function of maintaining a delicate balance between demand and supply. For the most part, the primary focus of the supplier relationship is ensuring the right materials are available at the right time and location. However, sourcing managers with a narrow focus on delivery are missing out on one of the greatest advantages of forging collaborative supplier partnerships: an opportunity to drive synergies that are otherwise perceived as impossible within the confines of the business. The game-changer is when you drive those synergies with thousands, not hundreds of suppliers. Look at the Apple Store as a prime example of collaboration en masse. Without the apps, the iPhone is just another ordinary phone!

3. Collaboration comes in more than one flavor

Suppliers don’t just collaborate with you to provide a critical component or service. They also work with your engineers to help ensure costs are optimized from the buyer’s perspective as well as the supplier’s side. They may even take over the provisioning of an entire end-to-end solution. Or co-design with your R&D team through joint research and development. These forms of collaboration aren’t new, but they are becoming more common and more critical. And they are becoming more impactful, because once you start extending any of these collaboration models to more and more suppliers, your capabilities as a business increase by orders of magnitude. If one good supplier can enable your company to build its brand, expand its reach, and establish its position as a market leader – imagine what’s possible when you work collaboratively with hundreds or thousands of suppliers.

4. Keeping product sustainability top of mind pays off

Facing increasing demand for sustainable products and production, companies are relying on suppliers to answer this new market requirement.

As a sourcing manager, you may need to go outside your comfort zone to think about new, innovative ways to collaborate for achieving sustainability. Recently, I heard from an acquaintance who is a CPO of a leading services company. His organization is currently collaborating with one of the largest suppliers in the world to adhere to regulatory mandates and consumer demand for “lean and green” lightbulbs. Although this approach was interesting to me, what really struck me was his observation on how this co-innovation with the supplier is spawning cost and resource optimization and the delivery of competitive products. As reported by Andrew Winston in The Harvard Business Review, Target and Walmart partnered to launch the Personal Care Sustainability Summit last year. So even competitors are collaborating with each other and with their suppliers in the name of sustainability.

5. Co-marketing is a win-win

Look at your list of suppliers. Does anyone have a brand that is bigger than your company’s? Believe it or not, almost all of us do. So why not seize the opportunity to raise your and your supplier’s brand profile in the marketplace?

Take Intel, for example. The laptop you’re working on right now may very well have an “Intel inside” sticker on it. That’s co-marketing at work. Consistently ranked as one of the world’s top 100 most valuable brands by Millward Brown Optimor, this largest supplier of microprocessors is world-renowned for its technology and innovation. For many companies that buy supplies from Intel, the decision to co-market is a strategic approach to convey that the product is reliable and provides real value for their computing needs.

6. Suppliers get to choose their customers, too

Increased competition for high-performing suppliers is changing the way procurement operates, say 58% of procurement executives in the Oxford Economics study. Buyers have a responsibility to the supplier – and to their CEO – to be a customer of choice. When the economy is going well, you might be able to dictate the supplier’s goods and services – and sometimes even the service delivery model. When times get tough (and they can very quickly), suppliers will typically reevaluate your organization’s needs to see whether they can continue service in a fiscally responsible manner. To secure suppliers’ attention in favorable and challenging economic conditions, your organization should establish collaborative and mutually productive partnerships with them.

7. Suppliers can help simplify operations

Cost optimization will always be one of your performance metrics; however, that is only one small part of the entire puzzle. What will help your organization get noticed is leveraging the supplier relationship to innovate new and better ways of managing the product line and operating the business while balancing risk and cost optimization. Ask yourself: Which functions are no longer needed? Can they be outsourced to a supplier that can perform them better? What can be automated?

8. Suppliers have a better grasp of your sourcing categories than you do

Understand your category like never before so that your organization can realize the full potential of its supplier investments while delivering products that are consistent and of high quality. How? By leveraging the wisdom of your suppliers. To be blunt: they know more than you do. Tap into that knowledge to gain a solid understanding of the product, market category, suppliers’ capabilities, and shifting dynamics in the industry, If a buyer does not understand these areas deeply, no amount of collaboration will empower a supplier to help your company innovate as well as optimize costs and resources.

9. Remember that there’s something in it for you as well

All of us want to do strategic, impactful work. Sourcing managers with aspirations of becoming CPOs should move beyond writing contracts and pushing PO requests by building strategic procurement skill sets. For example, a working knowledge in analytics allows you to choose suppliers that can shape the market and help a product succeed – and can catch the eye of the senior leadership team.

Sundar Kamak is global vice president of solutions marketing at Ariba, an SAP company.

For more on supplier collaboration, read Making Collaboration Pay Off, part of a series on the Future of Procurement, by Oxford Economics.

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Sundar Kamak

About Sundar Kamak

Sundar Kamak is the Vice President of Products & Innovation at SAP Ariba. He is an accomplished Solutions Marketing and Product Management Execuive with 15 + year's broad experience in product strategy, positioning, SaaS, Freemium offering, go-to-market planning and execution.

Transform Or Die: What Will You Do In The Digital Economy?

Scott Feldman and Puneet Suppal

By now, most executives are keenly aware that the digital economy can be either an opportunity or a threat. The question is not whether they should engage their business in it. Rather, it’s how to unleash the power of digital technology while maintaining a healthy business, leveraging existing IT investments, and innovating without disrupting themselves.

Yet most of those executives are shying away Businesspeople in a Meeting --- Image by © Monalyn Gracia/Corbisfrom such a challenge. According to a recent study by MIT Sloan and Capgemini, only 15% of CEOs are executing a digital strategy, even though 90% agree that the digital economy will impact their industry. As these businesses ignore this reality, early adopters of digital transformation are achieving 9% higher revenue creation, 26% greater impact on profitability, and 12% more market valuation.

Why aren’t more leaders willing to transform their business and seize the opportunity of our hyperconnected world? The answer is as simple as human nature. Innately, humans are uncomfortable with the notion of change. We even find comfort in stability and predictability. Unfortunately, the digital economy is none of these – it’s fast and always evolving.

Digital transformation is no longer an option – it’s the imperative

At this moment, we are witnessing an explosion of connections, data, and innovations. And even though this hyperconnectivity has changed the game, customers are radically changing the rules – demanding simple, seamless, and personalized experiences at every touch point.

Billions of people are using social and digital communities to provide services, share insights, and engage in commerce. All the while, new channels for engaging with customers are created, and new ways for making better use of resources are emerging. It is these communities that allow companies to not only give customers what they want, but also align efforts across the business network to maximize value potential.

To seize the opportunities ahead, businesses must go beyond sensors, Big Data, analytics, and social media. More important, they need to reinvent themselves in a manner that is compatible with an increasingly digital world and its inhabitants (a.k.a. your consumers).

Here are a few companies that understand the importance of digital transformation – and are reaping the rewards:

  1. Under Armour:  No longer is this widely popular athletic brand just selling shoes and apparel. They are connecting 38 million people on a digital platform. By focusing on this services side of the business, Under Armour is poised to become a lifestyle advisor and health consultant, using his product side as the enabler.
  1. Port of Hamburg: Europe’s second-largest port is keeping carrier trucks and ships productive around the clock. By fusing facility, weather, and traffic conditions with vehicle availability and shipment schedules, the Port increased container handling capacity by 178% without expanding its physical space.
  1. Haier Asia: This top-ranking multinational consumer electronics and home appliances company decided to disrupt itself before someone else did. The company used a two-prong approach to digital transformation to create a service-based model to seize the potential of changing consumer behaviors and accelerate product development. 
  1. Uber: This startup darling is more than just a taxi service. It is transforming how urban logistics operates through a technology trifecta: Big Data, cloud, and mobile.
  1. American Society of Clinical Oncologists (ASCO): Even nonprofits can benefit from digital transformation. ASCO is transforming care for cancer patients worldwide by consolidating patient information with its CancerLinQ. By unlocking knowledge and value from the 97% of cancer patients who are not involved in clinical trials, healthcare providers can drive better, more data-driven decision making and outcomes.

It’s time to take action 

During the SAP Executive Technology Summit at SAP TechEd on October 19–20, an elite group of CIOs, CTOs, and corporate executives will gather to discuss the challenges of digital transformation and how they can solve them. With the freedom of open, candid, and interactive discussions led by SAP Board Members and senior technology leadership, delegates will exchange ideas on how to get on the right path while leveraging their existing technology infrastructure.

Stay tuned for exclusive insights from this invitation-only event in our next blog!
Scott Feldman is Global Head of the SAP HANA Customer Community at SAP. Connect with him on Twitter @sfeldman0.

Puneet Suppal drives Solution Strategy and Adoption (Customer Innovation & IoT) at SAP Labs. Connect with him on Twitter @puneetsuppal.

 

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Scott Feldman and Puneet Suppal

About Scott Feldman and Puneet Suppal

Scott Feldman is the Head of SAP HANA International Customer Community. Puneet Suppal is the Customer Co-Innovation & Solution Adoption Executive at SAP.

Robots: Job Destroyers or Human Partners? [INFOGRAPHIC]

Christopher Koch

Robots: Job Destroyers or Human Partners? [INFOGRAPHIC]

To learn more about how humans and robots will co-evolve, read the in-depth report Bring Your Robot to Work.

Download the PDF (91KB)

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Christopher Koch

About Christopher Koch

Christopher Koch is the Editorial Director of the SAP Center for Business Insight. He is an experienced publishing professional, researcher, editor, and writer in business, technology, and B2B marketing. Share your thoughts with Chris on Twitter @Ckochster.

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Building A Business Case For Financial Transformation

Nilly Essaides

There’s constant pressure on the CFO from the CEO to do better—to innovate, and to transform the finance organization into both a leaner and a more forward-looking analytics hub that provides insight and foresight to the enterprise. CFOs today must:

  • Interpret numbers instead of reporting them
  • Deploy enabling technology to automate low-value work
  • Scout for business and growth opportunities
  • Work effectively with Big Data to turn their teams into the brains of the organization
  • Act as true partners to the CEO, business leaders, and board of directors

Defining the ROI for transformation

Transformation sounds great in theory, but to get finance to literally go beyond its form—not an easy feat—executives need to see a strong business case and a tangible payback. After all, finance is all about the ROI.

Here are some solutions CFOs can wrap their heads around to help drive change:

  • Manage competitive disruption. Today’s business environment is rife with competitive threats. My last post listed five ways financial planning and analysis (FP&A) in its future form can help companies battle these threats. The cost of not transforming the finance function into the fast-thinking, forward-looking brains of the enterprise is the opportunity cost of falling behind. It’s the risk of becoming irrelevant through the inability to foresee competitive threats, or of lacking an action plan for dealing with the potential impact of such pressures on the financial health of the corporation.
  • Streamline processes. Obviously, there’s the dollars-and-cents savings that come from streamlining processes, using new technologies, and breaking down internal silos. For example, in many organizations, forecasting processes occur in different departments. Merging these disparate processes into one and using a single technology platform can save enormous resources in terms of systems and time. It eliminates duplicate entries of data and the need to reconcile discordant information, or the need to later argue about which number is right. It creates a single version of the truth.

Even within finance, things can be improved. Often the processes of budgeting, forecasting, and planning happen in isolation in different time frames. And operational and financial planning occur in different cycles and levels. By syncing up these processes, companies can get rid of redundancies. What’s more important, they can discover efficiencies and improve the quality of the end product.

  • Eliminate waste and free up strategic time. New technologies are enabling the finance function to automate low-value work and free up executives’ time to focus on strategic thinking, developing partnerships with the business, and advising management on how to drive growth. The payback is smarter decisions (faster growth, higher investment returns) while lowering operating expenses.
  • Look forward. Finance and FP&A today are shifting their focus from yesterday to tomorrow, from what happened to what’s going to happen. Transforming their mindset is key to helping the business move forward. Using techniques and technologies like driver-based modeling and predictive analytics, finance is remaking itself and producing faster, more frequent and—most importantly—more accurate forecasts. It’s giving management the one thing that matters most: time to pull business levers to affect future financial results. The payback is higher sales, wider margins, and lower cost of operations.
  • Change the mindset. There’s no transformation of the financial organization without a transformation of the financial skill set of executives. The first-quarter Deloitte CFO Signal Survey indicated that CFOs expect to embark on a wide range of efforts to improve the performance of their teams before the end of 2016. While foundational finance skills remain a must, to transform finance into the “A-team” of the future, executives must possess business acumen, diplomacy skills, intellectual curiosity, technology savvy, and a degree of comfort with ambivalence. They have to be okay with making decisions without 100% of the information. One can argue that the return on soft skills is soft. But it also means being able to move fast and grab windows of opportunity. Not all business cases are based on cost savings.
  • Build an analytics hub. The biggest challenge for CFOs today is to transform finance into the analytical hub of the organization and leverage Big Data to drive smarter business decisions—both in terms of cost cutting and in giving the business units advice on how to market, sell, develop, and grow their operations. That’s how finance fits within the digital enterprise. Finance needs to funnel Big Data from all corners of the organization—and outside it—to leverage its unique central viewpoint. It must bring the information together and run it through advanced analytics models to come up with causal relationships that explain what business initiatives are really moving the needle, what steps the company can take to improve results, and what its customers are doing and are likely to do. Digitizing finance has a huge payback: It allows companies to stay competitive in a digital economy.

Is finance transformation worth the effort? That may be the wrong question. The question is, can companies afford not to transform their finance function and remain relevant now and going forward?

Learn how the FP&A team at CF Industries Holdings Inc. prioritized business partnering options and transformed the organization to optimally support strategic goals by establishing an integrated business planning process at the AFP Annual Conference session, Driving Finance Transformation Through Integrated Business Planning.

For more of my insights on FP&A, subscribe to the monthly FP&A e-newsletter from my company, the Association for Financial Professionals. You can also connect with me on LinkedIn or follow me on Twitter.

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Nilly Essaides

About Nilly Essaides

Nilly Essaides is the director of the FP&A Practice at the Association for Financial Professionals. She has over 25 years of experience in the finance field. Nilly has written multiple in-depth research reports on FP&A and Treasury topics, as well as countless articles. She also speaks at conferences and moderates financial executives' roundtables across the country. Nilly has published a book on best-practice transfer and process excellence with the APQC, "If We Only Knew What We Know."