Sections

Why Mobility Matters For Professional Services

Carr Phillips

Why Mobility Matters

Why Mobility MattersAlways-on-the-go consultants are the epitome of a highly mobile workforce – making mobility a must-have strategy for professional services firms. As early adopters of mobile devices, consultants are on the forefront of wireless technologies and applications and have high expectations of how it can improve the way they work.

They also realize that the technology exists right now – from really smart smartphones to everywhere Wi-Fi access – to support true mobility and enhanced productivity in professional services organizations. As smartphone penetration and adoption rates soar, handheld devices are poised to eclipse the desktop and laptop as must-have technologies.

The Consumerization of Technology

When it comes to mobility, employees are driving how they want to interact with information – and expecting IT departments to support a wide range of personal mobile devices and applications. Mobile applications are being developed for employees who work outside of the office, to make it easier for them to complete tasks while traveling or at a client site.

In addition, many firms are planning to support more mobile devices or smartphones for their employees – even allowing employees to bring their personal mobile devices into the office and providing some level of support to these devices as well. We see this as part of a broader trend called the “consumerization of IT” in which employees solve customer and business problems using technology that they master first at home, such as social media, mobile apps, and more.

In short, consultants want to interact with business data as easily and as intuitively as they use Facebook or Twitter.

Rising Expectations for Increased Productivity

Both client expectations and organizational needs are driving the push for increased mobility in the professional services industry. Clients, often mobile device users themselves, expect rapid and fluid response and recommendations from consultants, not to mention quick and decisive action regardless of location. For example, a client might expect a consultant to execute expert searches immediately, resolving any questions that arise, at any point in a project.

At the same time, organizational expectations are pushing consultants to be more productive – or at least to give that impression by being constantly available anytime and anywhere, with very little downtime. Mobile applications can speed processes and support rapid decision making, and both aspects translate into increased productivity. Dynamic reports let consultants make quick decisions online and communicate them to clients in the moment. Since the workforce is geographically dispersed, information needs to flow when and where consultants need it.

Speed Decisions, Accelerate Processes

Professional services firms are positioned to derive great benefits from mobilization across the enterprise, from executives to consultants to support staff. But to do so successfully, a firm must address the daunting task of supporting a wide ranging ecosystem of operating systems, devices, and applications required to empower its mobile workers.

To mobilize with power and control in a way that helps its users get the most out of mobile technology, a firm should identify those activities that provide the most opportunity. The best candidates for mobilization are complex processes that require rapid decisions based on information, analysis, or approval from multiple people. In such cases, successful mobilization can speed decision time, accelerate the process, and provide significant ROI.

What processes are ripe for mobile applications at your Professional Services firm?

Join the conversation about SAP for Professional Services:

Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube | Slide Share

Comments

About Carr Phillips

Carr Phillips previously held the role of Senior Director of Industry Solutions Marketing at SAP. His specialties include product management, product marketing, go-to-market, and demand generation.

Compelling Shopping Moments: 4 Creative Ways Stores Connect With Their Customers

Ralf Kern

compelling shopping momentsOn a recent morning, as I was going through my usual routine, my coffeemaker broke. I cannot live without coffee in the morning, so I immediately looked up my coffeemaker on Amazon and had it shipped Prime in one day. My problem was solved within minutes. My Amazon app, and my loyalty account with that company, was there for me when I needed it most.

It was in this moment that I realized the importance of digital presence for retailers. There is a chance that the store 10 minutes from my house carries this very same coffeemaker; I could have had it in one hour, instead of one day. But the need for immediate access to information pushed me to the online store. My local retailer was not able to be there for me digitally like Amazon.

Retail is still about reading the minds of your customers in order to know what they need and create a flawless experience. But the days of the unconnected shopper in a monochannel world are over. I am not alone in my digital-first mindset; according to a recent MasterCard report, 80% of consumers use technology during the shopping process. I, and consumers like me, use mobile devices as a guide to the physical world.

We don’t need to have an academic discussion about multichannel, omnichannel, and omnicommerce and their meanings, because what it really comes down to for your consumers, or fans, is shopping. And shopping has everything to do with moments in your customers’ lives: celebration moments, in-a-hurry moments, I-want-to-be-entertained moments, and more. Most companies only look for and measure very few moments along the shopping journey, like the moment of coupon download or the moment of sales.

Anticipating these moments was easier when mom and pop stores knew their customers by name. They knew how to be there for their shoppers when, where, and how they wanted it. And shoppers didn’t have any other options. Now it is crucial for companies to understand all of these moments and even anticipate or trigger the right moments for their customers.

In today’s digital economy the way to achieve customer connection is with simple, enjoyable, and personalized front ends that are supported by sophisticated, digital back ends. Then you can use that system to support your customer outreach.

Companies around the world are using creative and innovative methods to find their customers in various moments. Being there for customers comes in many different shapes and forms. Consider these examples:

Chilli Beans

A Brazilian maker of fashion sunglasses, glasses, and watches, Chilli Beans has a loyal following online and at over 700 locations around the world. Chilli Beans keeps its customers engaged by releasing 10 limited-edition styles each week. If customers like what they see, they have to buy fast or risk missing out.

Bonobos

Online men’s fashion retailer Bonobos reaches its customers with its Guide Shops. While they look like traditional retail outlets, the shops don’t actually sell any clothes. Customers come in for one-on-one appointments with the staff, and if they like anything that they try on, the staff member orders it for them online and it is shipped to their house. The 20 Guide Shops currently open have proven very successful for the company.

Peak Performance

Peak Performance, a European maker of outdoor clothing, has added a little magic to its customer experience. It has created virtual pop-up shops that customers can track on their smartphones through CatchMagicHour.com, and they are only available at sunrise and sunset at exact GPS locations. Customers who go to the location, be it at a lighthouse or on top of a mountain, are rewarded with the ability to select free clothing from the virtual shop that they have unlocked on their phones.

Shoes of Prey

The customer experience is completely custom at Shoes of Prey, a website where women can design custom shoes. From fabric to color, the customer picks every element, and then her custom creation is sent directly to her house. Shoes of Prey has even shifted its business model based on customer feedback. Its customers wanted to get inspiration and advice in a physical store. So Shoes of Prey made the move from online-only to omnicommerce and has started to open stores around the world.

While the customer experience for each of these connections is relatively simple – a website, a smartphone, an online design studio – the back end that powers them has to be powerful and nimble at the same time. These sophisticated back ends – powering simple, enjoyable, and personalized front ends – will completely change the game in retail. They will allow companies to engage their customers in ways we can’t even begin to imagine.

Technology will help you be there in the shopping moment. The best technology won’t annoy your customers with irrelevant promotions or pop-up messages. Instead, like a good friend, it will know how to engage with customers and when to leave them alone – how to truly connect with customers instead of manage them. Consequently, customer relationship management as we know it is an outdated technology in the economy of today – and tomorrow. Technologies that go beyond CRM will help retailers to differentiate. Aligning your organization and those technologies will be the Holy Grail to creating true and sustainable customer loyalty.

Learn more ways that business will never be the same again. Learn 99 Mind-Blowing Ways The Digital Economy Is Changing The Future Of Business.

Find out how SAP can help you go beyond CRM and support your retail business.

Ralf Kern is Global Vice President Retail for SAP and a retail ambassador for SAP. Interested in your feedback. You can also get in touch on Twitter or LinkedIn

This blog also appeared on SAP Customer Network.

Comments

Ralf Kern

About Ralf Kern

Ralf Kern is the Global Vice President, Business Unit Retail, at SAP, responsible for the future direction of SAP’s solution and global Go-to-Market strategy for Omnicommerce Retail, leading them into today’s digital reality.

IoT Can Keep You Healthy — Even When You Sleep [VIDEO]

Christine Donato

Today the Internet of Things is revamping technology. IoT image from American Geniuses.jpg

Smart devices speak to each other and work together to provide the end user with a better product experience.

Coinciding with this change in technology is a change in people. We’ve transitioned from a world of people who love processed foods and french fries to people who eat kale chips and Greek yogurt…and actually like it.

People are taking ownership of their well-being, and preventative care is at the forefront of focus for both physicians and patients. Fitness trackers alert wearers of the exact number of calories burned from walking a certain number of steps. Mobile apps calculate our perfect nutritional balance. And even while we sleep, people are realizing that it’s important to monitor vitals.

According to research conducted at Harvard University, proper sleep patterns bolster healthy side effects such as improved immune function, a faster metabolism, preserved memory, and reduced stress and depression.

Conversely, the Harvard study determined that lack of sleep can negatively affect judgement, mood, and the ability retain information, as well as increase the risk of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and even premature death.

Through the Internet of Things, researchers can now explore sleep patterns without the usual sleep labs and movement-restricting electrode wires. And with connected devices, individuals can now easily monitor and positively influence their own health.

EarlySense, a startup credited with the creation of continuous patient monitoring solutions focused on early detection of patient deterioration, mid-sleep falls, and pressure ulcers, began with a mission to prevent premature and preventable deaths.

Without constant monitoring, patients with unexpected clinical deterioration may be accidentally neglected, and their conditions can easily escalate into emergency situations.

Motivated by many instances of patients who died from preventable post-elective surgery complications, EarlySense founders created a product that constantly monitors patients when hospital nurses can’t, alerting the main nurse station when a patient leaves his or her bed and could potentially fall, or when a patient’s vital signs drop or rise unexpectedly.

Now EarlySense technology has expanded outside of the hospital realm. The EarlySense wellness sensor, a device connected via the Internet of Things, mobile solutions, and supported by SAP HANA Cloud Platform, monitors all vital signs while a person sleeps. The device is completely wireless and lies subtly underneath one’s mattress. The sensor collects all mechanical vibrations that the patient’s body emits while sleeping, continuously monitoring heart and respiratory rates.

Watch this short video to learn more about how the EarlySense wellness sensor works:

The result is faster diagnoses with better treatments and outcomes. Sleep issues can be identified and addressed; individuals can use the data collected to make adjustments in diet or exercise habits; and those on heavy pain medications can monitor the way their bodies react to the medication. In addition, physicians can use the data collected from the sensor to identify patient health problems before they escalate into an emergency situation.

Connected care is opening the door for a new way to practice health. Through connected care apps that link people with their doctors, fitness trackers that measure daily activity, and sensors like the EarlySense wellness sensor, today’s technology enables people and physicians to work together to prevent sickness and accidents before they occur. Technology is forever changing the way we live, and in turn we are living longer, healthier lives.

To learn how SAP HANA Cloud Platform can affect your business, visit It&Me.

For more stories, join me on Twitter.

Comments

About Christine Donato

Christine Donato is a Senior Integrated Marketing Specialist at SAP. She is an accomplished project manager and leader of multiple marketing and sales enablement campaigns and events, that supported a multi million euro business.

How Emotionally Aware Computing Can Bring Happiness to Your Organization

Christopher Koch


Do you feel me?

Just as once-novel voice recognition technology is now a ubiquitous part of human–machine relationships, so too could mood recognition technology (aka “affective computing”) soon pervade digital interactions.

Through the application of machine learning, Big Data inputs, image recognition, sensors, and in some cases robotics, artificially intelligent systems hunt for affective clues: widened eyes, quickened speech, and crossed arms, as well as heart rate or skin changes.




Emotions are big business

The global affective computing market is estimated to grow from just over US$9.3 billion a year in 2015 to more than $42.5 billion by 2020.

Source: “Affective Computing Market 2015 – Technology, Software, Hardware, Vertical, & Regional Forecasts to 2020 for the $42 Billion Industry” (Research and Markets, 2015)

Customer experience is the sweet spot

Forrester found that emotion was the number-one factor in determining customer loyalty in 17 out of the 18 industries it surveyed – far more important than the ease or effectiveness of customers’ interactions with a company.


Source: “You Can’t Afford to Overlook Your Customers’ Emotional Experience” (Forrester, 2015)


Humana gets an emotional clue

Source: “Artificial Intelligence Helps Humana Avoid Call Center Meltdowns” (The Wall Street Journal, October 27, 2016)

Insurer Humana uses artificial intelligence software that can detect conversational cues to guide call-center workers through difficult customer calls. The system recognizes that a steady rise in the pitch of a customer’s voice or instances of agent and customer talking over one another are causes for concern.

The system has led to hard results: Humana says it has seen an 28% improvement in customer satisfaction, a 63% improvement in agent engagement, and a 6% improvement in first-contact resolution.


Spread happiness across the organization

Source: “Happiness and Productivity” (University of Warwick, February 10, 2014)

Employers could monitor employee moods to make organizational adjustments that increase productivity, effectiveness, and satisfaction. Happy employees are around 12% more productive.




Walking on emotional eggshells

Whether customers and employees will be comfortable having their emotions logged and broadcast by companies is an open question. Customers may find some uses of affective computing creepy or, worse, predatory. Be sure to get their permission.


Other limiting factors

The availability of the data required to infer a person’s emotional state is still limited. Further, it can be difficult to capture all the physical cues that may be relevant to an interaction, such as facial expression, tone of voice, or posture.



Get a head start


Discover the data

Companies should determine what inferences about mental states they want the system to make and how accurately those inferences can be made using the inputs available.


Work with IT

Involve IT and engineering groups to figure out the challenges of integrating with existing systems for collecting, assimilating, and analyzing large volumes of emotional data.


Consider the complexity

Some emotions may be more difficult to discern or respond to. Context is also key. An emotionally aware machine would need to respond differently to frustration in a user in an educational setting than to frustration in a user in a vehicle.

 


 

download arrowTo learn more about how affective computing can help your organization, read the feature story Empathy: The Killer App for Artificial Intelligence.


Comments

About Christopher Koch

Christopher Koch is the Editorial Director of the SAP Center for Business Insight. He is an experienced publishing professional, researcher, editor, and writer in business, technology, and B2B marketing. Share your thoughts with Chris on Twitter @Ckochster.

Tags:

Enterprise Information Management: The Foundational Core Of Digital Transformation Success

Paul Lewis

The definition and implementation of digital transformation has become so muddled that no two organizations are focusing on the same strategies and initiatives. Many companies choose to engage in e-commerce and social media to extend their customer base with engaging, personalized, and round-the-clock shopping experiences. Some eye operational efficiencies through the Internet of Things (IoT) and artificial intelligence. And a growing segment is enticed by game-changing insights from analytics and social sentiments.

No matter the digital strategy, data is the foundation of all of these efforts. The customer experience is about understanding clients and offering services that answer their needs. Decision making requires stored knowledge that can be easily shared, secured, and applied. Operational excellence runs on meaningful insight that drives performance and keeps workers safe.

In digital transformation, every change relies on converting data into actionable decisions. According to Capgemini, companies that act on an enterprise information management (EIM) strategy outperform their rivals by as much as 26%.

The EIM difference in digital transformation

A data point by itself may seem unrelated and inconsequential. But when enterprise data is united and managed as one asset, decision makers finally have trusted, complete, and relevant information they need to seize opportunities and avoid risks that were previously hidden in the background.

One of my clients, Pravine Balkaran, global head of IT at Spin Master, one of the world’s largest toy and media entertainment companies, said it best: “It’s about being able to apply standardization and automation to the entire ecosystem to bring value and move the business forward.”

EIM derives new value by incorporating the traditional functions of data, including business intelligence, data science, analytics, data storage and archiving, data stewardship, and data mobility technology. The more data added, the more valuable the ecosystem becomes – without the complexity commonly experienced when searching for potentially valuable data across a diverse set of existing applications.

By applying EIM to the core of its digital strategy, companies like Spin Master are capturing and coalescing data from a variety of sources and turning it into actionable information to drive better decision making, innovate new products, enter new markets, and encourage a more responsive customer experience.

The EIM road map towards rapid creation of new value

Now for the hard part: Putting EIM into action and at the center of your digital transformation business strategy. There are five things you should do now before moving to a more digitalized and data-driven way of doing business.

1. Inventory available information

Most companies believe that their data resides in core databases and a data model of known entities such as claims, transactions, vendors, and suppliers. Although this is a widely used approach to determining the class of your information, it is only a small part of what you actually own. Structured, unstructured, and semi-structured data; log files; conversations; customer sentiment; and real-time information from suppliers and vendors, for example, should be integrated as part of the overall EIM philosophy.

2. Classify your inventory

Data typically can be classified with one or more of these six attributes:

  • Real-time, streaming data, which potentially comes from machines
  • Static data from production databases
  • Valuable data in real time once stored
  • Realizes value over time and as it changes
  • Relevant to a particular government mandate or legislative concern
  • Objective and relative importance to divisions of the overall enterprise, including customers and the business network

With this exercise, you can begin to understand the function that each data point serves and its usefulness in the future.

3. Encourage the business culture to appreciate the value of discovery

Data-driven decision making is not based on blind faith that data always tells the right story. Rather, it is asking the right questions, and knowing how to dig deep into the data helps us make the connections we need to get an accurate picture of the current situation. Once you discover those nuggets of insight gold, data science and advanced analytics can be applied to pinpoint the appropriate solution. Later, you can leverage data visualization tools to communicate findings and proposed action in a format that is quick and easy for all levels of the enterprise to consume.

4. Shift your focus from yesterday to today and beyond

Traditionally, data analysis is an exercise of looking backward to determine the how, what, when, and why an event happened. However, the pace of change in every aspect of the business has accelerated so much, that it’s rendered this retrospective approach to analytics nearly useless. Real-time access to data allows decision makers to know what’s happening in the moment and how it will impact the future to seize opportunities and mitigate risks.

The path to digital transformation is paved with data

The volume of data generated by people across the entire business network – from employee to consumer and everyone in between – represents a veritable trove of information, insights, and inspiration for innovation. But first, companies need to know where to find this data and how to best apply it to everyday decision making. With EIM, data can be broken down and reassembled into a manageable form that is meaningful, outcome-driven, and transformational.

Learn more about how to uncover Data – The Hidden Treasure Inside Your Business.

Comments

Paul Lewis

About Paul Lewis

Paul Lewis is the Chief Technology Officer in Hitachi for the Americas, responsible for the leading technology trend mastery and evangelism, client executive advocacy, and external delivery of the Hitachi vision and strategy especially related to digital transformation and social innovation. Additionally, Paul contributes to field enablement of data intelligence and analytics; interprets and translates complex technology trends including cloud, mobility, governance, and information management; and represents the Americas region in the Global Technology Office, the Hitachi LTD R&D division. In his role of trusted advisor to the CIO community, Paul’s explicit goal is to ensure clients’ problems are solved and opportunities realized. Paul can be found at his blog, on Twitter, and on LinkedIn.