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Replacing Legacy Core Banking Systems

Tom Groenfeldt

legacy system in banksMoving a large bank from its existing 20 or 30-year old legacy system to a new core banking platform is often compared to changing engines on an airliner flying at 30,000 feet. Volunteer mechanics have been rare.

But it has been done — Commonwealth Bank of Australia (CBA) has installed SAP as its core system and Nationwide, a mutual bank in England, has also been implementing SAP.

What will it take to move a large U.S. bank off a legacy system?

“It could be a major customer outage, it could be a fraud or just that their competition does it,” said Mark DeCastro, research director at IDC Financial Insights.

SAP said one of the banks that moved to its core system was able to drop their efficiency ratio — the non-interest costs  of generating revenue — into the 40s.

“When you have banks in this country in the 60s to 80, if anybody comes and gets 40s they will start to make the others move.” It could be one of the large regionals or US Bank, perhaps, he said.

Only a couple of companies can do this. Temenos provides systems for mid-size banks but hasn’t done a major money center bank. The leading contender for large banks is SAP which has been installed at Commonwealth Bank of Australia — the 4th largest bank in the world by market capitalization — and is underway in a long-term project at Nationwide, the UK savings  bank.

DeCastro said that Oracle is developing a new platform — not related to the Flexcube core banking system it acquired several years ago — that will be geared to large banks.

“They have been developing it for 18 months and they are still adding modules. In this country it is going to take a significant event to rattle the nerves and get these banks to set up and start modernizing their core systems.”

Wells Fargo, which is a leader in understanding clients to cross-sell and up-sell to increase wallet share — a company-wide objective — is running its consumer accounts on an aging CSC Hogan mainframe system.

Andrew Hagger, general manager for transformation and analytics at Commonwealth Bank (CBA), explained his firm’s use of the SAP core banking platform at an SAP financial services conference in October. With more than 1,000 branches, the bank has the largest volume of transactions in the southern hemisphere, he said.

CBA believes that real-time banking provides a competitive advantage through greater liquidity and reduced transaction costs. Its investment in technology supports its goal to be customer centric, channel agnostic, real-time and 7-day and to be agile in making offers and bundling products — all familiar goals in banking. Still, CBA calls it the Revolution Story.

“The revolution is about simplicity, customization and greater control for you in meeting your customers’ needs. It’s about agility, it;s about consistency, and most of all, it’s about our fitting our customers’ goals and aspirations, not them fitting our products and systems.”

The bank hits a theme that has appeared with increasing frequency in banking technology — industrialization, or as CBA describes it ”Introduction of common processes across businesses, segments and products.” It also talks of multi-entity support — the ability to use the core system to support something like an Internet-only bank or an entirely mobile platform.

Two keys to success are richer customer information and innovation at speed, supported by being able to experiment to find out what customers want.

DeCastro said that banks have typically done a very poor job of managing the customer data they have.

“Typically it is managed at the product level, not at the customer level, although we are beginning to see that change,” he said.

“When I have a customer on the phone or in a branch, I don’t really care so much which products they have. I want to know their overall profitability, behavior, life events  — that is where the analytics and the tools becoming available will really help — looking at the customer as an individual relationship.”

Scott Gnau, chief technology officer at Teradata, said that its analytics combined with Aprimo relationship manager technology for marketing, can draw on data to deliver individually personalized offers through a branch, call center or Internet and mobile banking. The offers are based on the individual, not a broad ranking like a platinum or gold customer, he said.

“When we have an interaction and I say no, the operator hits a button, the system goes back through the infrastructure, recalculates all the segmentations and comes back with the next best offer. It can do that multiple times. That creates the illusion of discretion without the cost of discretion through real-time active data warehousing.”

DeCastro said that American banks have been a little slow in developing highly personalized marketing compared to some other regions around the world.

“Some of that has to do with the legacy core systems we have in this country.

CBA has a significant investment with SAP and because of that they are now able to do a lot more with analytics and drilling very targeted offers.

Implementing SAP hasn’t been easy or quick. The bank’s timeline shows it introduced the idea to the board in 2007 and signed with Accenture and SAP later that year. It launched part of the system in 2009, migrated 10 million accounts in 2010 and offered 24×7 banking later that year.

Some of the goals sound very much like Wells Fargo — long-lasting customer relationships  and the ability to use technology and analytics to deliver the right offers at the right time.  A more ambitious goal is ”to acquire and retain high value customers by meeting their needs at the right time in their decision making process through the right channels.”

DeCastro said banks haven’t successfully absorbed all the new technology, especially on the customer-facing side.

“I think we have spent too much time looking at mobile banking and not enough at looking to integrate all the channels for seamless experience. Mobile has been elevated at the expense of online which is an extremely important channel that won’t go away.”

He expects that banks will eventually move to a single platform which is device agnostic — mobile will operate through a Web browser and provide the same experience as internet banking rather than through an application.

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Why 3D Printed Food Just Transformed Your Supply Chain

Hans Thalbauer

Numerous sectors are experimenting with 3D printing, which has the potential to disrupt many markets. One that’s already making progress is the food industry.

The U.S. Army hopes to use 3D printers to customize food for each soldier. NASA is exploring 3D printing of food in space. The technology could eventually even end hunger around the world.

What does that have to do with your supply chain? Quite a bit — because 3D printing does more than just revolutionize the production process. It also requires a complete realignment of the supply chain.

And the way 3D printing transforms the supply chain holds lessons for how organizations must reinvent themselves in the new era of the extended supply chain.

Supply chain spaghetti junction

The extended supply chain replaces the old linear chain with not just a network, but a network of networks. The need for this network of networks is being driven by four key factors: individualized products, the sharing economy, resource scarcity, and customer-centricity.

To understand these forces, imagine you operate a large restaurant chain, and you’re struggling to differentiate yourself against tough competition. You’ve decided you can stand out by delivering customized entrees. In fact, you’re going to leverage 3D printing to offer personalized pasta.

With 3D printing technology, you can make one-off pasta dishes on the fly. You can give customers a choice of ingredients (gluten-free!), flavors (salted caramel!), and shapes (Leaning Towers of Pisa!). You can offer the personalized pasta in your restaurants, in supermarkets, and on your ecommerce website.

You may think this initiative simply requires you to transform production. But that’s just the beginning. You also need to re-architect research and development, demand signals, asset management, logistics, partner management, and more.

First, you need to develop the matrix of ingredients, flavors, and shapes you’ll offer. As part of that effort, you’ll have to consider health and safety regulations.

Then, you need to shift some of your manufacturing directly into your kitchens. That will also affect packaging requirements. Logistics will change as well, because instead of full truckloads, you’ll be delivering more frequently, with more variety, and in smaller quantities.

Next, you need to perfect demand signals to anticipate which pasta variations in which quantities will come through which channels. You need to manage supply signals source more kinds of raw materials in closer to real time.

Last, the source of your signals will change. Some will continue to come from point of sale. But others, such as supplies replenishment and asset maintenance, can come direct from your 3D printers.

Four key ingredients of the extended supply chain

As with our pasta scenario, the drivers of the extended supply chain require transformation across business models and business processes. First, growing demand for individualized products calls for the same shifts in R&D, asset management, logistics, and more that 3D printed pasta requires.

Second, as with the personalized entrees, the sharing economy integrates a network of partners, from suppliers to equipment makers to outsourced manufacturing, all electronically and transparently interconnected, in real time and all the time.

Third, resource scarcity involves pressures not just on raw materials but also on full-time and contingent labor, with the necessary skills and flexibility to support new business models and processes.

And finally, for personalized pasta sellers and for your own business, it all comes down to customer-centricity. To compete in today’s business environment and to meet current and future customer expectations, all your operations must increasingly revolve around rapidly comprehending and responding to customer demand.

Want to learn more? Check out my recent video on digitalizing the extended supply chain.

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Hans Thalbauer

About Hans Thalbauer

Hans Thalbauer is the Senior Vice President, Extended Supply Chain, at SAP. He is responsible for the strategic direction and the Go-To-Market of solutions for Supply Chain, Logistics, Engineering/R&D, Manufacturing, Asset Management and Sustainability at SAP.

How to Build Customer Loyalty Through Digital Emotional Affinity

Volker Hildebrand, Lori Mitchell-Keller, Christopher Koch, and Polly Traylor

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When the Amazon site was launched in 1995, followed by the heady years of dot-com mania, marketers believed they had reached nirvana with the speed, convenience, selection, and plain cool factor of online stores.

Digital technology revolutionized the way companies interacted with customers by making the research and purchasing processes more convenient. Yet research shows that companies have a long way to go in effectively using digital technologies to engage with their customers.
Just 49% of consumers say their experiences using Web sites on desktop and laptop computers are excellent, while a mere 18% of consumers say the same for shopping with mobile Web sites or apps.

The reason behind the failings of all this great technology is that loyalty is driven by positive emotions not just efficiencies. Ninety percent of purchasing decisions are made subconsciously, according to Caroline Winnett and Andrew Pohlmann of The Nielsen Company. Meanwhile, neuroscientist Antonio Damasio has found that for patients with brain damage affecting their abilities to feel emotions, making any decision at all is difficult.

By developing a concerted strategy to foster positive emotions in digital, companies can reduce churn, lower customer acquisition costs, and grow revenues per customer. “It’s getting harder and harder to put your message in front of customers effectively and efficiently,” says Tim Peter, founder of Tim Peter & Associates, an e-commerce, Internet marketing, and business strategy consultancy. “If you can get them once, you will more likely reengage them. My clients see emotional engagement as a differentiator.”

How does a company move from the robotic, unfeeling interface of technology to an experience where the customer can sense the people and brand behind it all? There’s no single method here; improving emotional affinity in digital requires a culture that’s hyper about monitoring and pleasing customers. It also begs for a hybrid approach of merging human experiences with digital, investing in omnichannel integration, and developing more creative approaches to online branding.

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Time For Banks To Fight Back

Laurence Leyden

Metamora, Illinois, USA --- USA, Illinois, Metamora, Close-up of man photographing checque --- Image by © Vstock LLC/Tetra Images/CorbisThe financial services industry has suffered consecutive blows in recent years. The global banking crisis, new regulations, empowered customers calling the shots, not to mention a new breed of digital disruptors out to steal market share, have wreaked havoc on business as usual.  Profits have been slashed, reputations have been damaged, and management has been blindsided.

The only way forward is change – a change of business model, a change of mindset, and a change of ecosystem.  It’s a major upheaval, and not to be taken lightly. Banks in particular have operated largely the same way for the past 300 years. Management is facing a once in a generation reassessment of 21st century banking.

Changes in customer behaviour, including 24×7 omnichannel service expectations, lack of loyalty by current customers willing to exchange privacy for easier access to information, generational expectations of future customers – “screenagers” and tech savvy Millennials – and technology advances in cloud, mobile, real-time data, and predictive analytics make yesterday’s business model redundant.

Banking isn’t actually about banking anymore. It’s about enabling people’s lifestyles. That means you have to completely re-think how you engage with customers. The lessons are everywhere in parallel industries. Nokia, for example, thought it was about the phone, not the customer experience. Digitisation has both emboldened and empowered customers. Ignoring this fact is pointless. You need to cater to what consumers want. That means your back-end systems need to be integrated, consistent, contextualised and easy to deploy across any channel.

There’s also a whole new ecosystem required to support this new business model. Banks are facing disaggregation as they no longer own the end-to-end value chain, as well as disintermediation as new market entrants attack specific parts of the business (think Apple Pay). Smart banks are forging relationships with different and unexpected partners, such as mobile and retail organisations, even providing products from outside of the group where they are the best fit for a customer’s needs.  As I’ve said in one of my previous blogs, there’s a new mantra for modern banking: “Must play well with others.”

Old-fashioned banking is gone, and with it so have old style processes, business models and attitudes. Nobody wants to be the last dinosaur.  It’s time for the industry to dust itself off, and step up. Embracing change is easier – and far more profitable – than risking irrelevance in the widening digital divide.

I’ve briefly summarised only some of the key drivers of digital transformation, but you can find much more insight – including views from thought leaders in banks, insurance companies, fintech providers, challenger banks and aggregators – by downloading the eBook from the recent SAP Financial Services Forum: The digital evolution – As technology transforms financial services who will triumph.

It’s essential reading if you’re going to successfully fight back.

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About Laurence Leyden

Laurence is general manager of Financial Services, EMEA, at SAP and is primarily involved in helping banks in their transformation agenda. Prior to SAP he worked for numerous banks in Europe and Asia including Barclays, Lloyds Banking Group and HSBC. He regularly presents on industry trends and SAP’s banking strategy.

Why Banks Should Be Bullish On Integrating Finance And Risk Data

Mike Russo

Welcome to the regulatory world of banking, where finance and risk must join forces to banking executiveensure compliance and control. Today it’s no longer sufficient to manage your bank’s performance using finance-only metrics such as net income. What you need is a risk-adjusted view of performance that identifies how much revenue you earn relative to the amount of risk you take on. That requires metrics that combine finance and risk components, such as risk-adjusted return on capital, shareholder value added, or economic value added.

While the smart money is on a unified approach to finance and risk, most banking institutions have isolated each function in a discrete technology “silo” complete with its own data set, models, applications, and reporting components. What’s more, banks continually reuse and replicate their finance and risk-related data – resulting in the creation of additional data stores filled with redundant data that grows exponentially over time. Integrating all this data on a single platform that supports both finance and risk scenarios can provide the data integrity and insight needed to meet regulations. Such an initiative may involve some heavy lifting, but the advantages extend far beyond compliance.

Cashing in on bottom-line benefits

Consider the potential cost savings of taking a more holistic approach to data management. In our work with large global banks, we estimate that data management – including validation, reconciliation, and copying data from one data mart to another – accounts for 50% to 70% of total IT costs. Now factor in the benefits of reining in redundancy. One bank we’re currently working with is storing the same finance and risk-related data 20 times. This represents a huge opportunity to save costs by eliminating data redundancy and all the associated processes that unfold once you start replicating data across multiple sources.

With the convergence of finance and risk, we’re seeing more banks reviewing their data architecture, thinking about new models, and considering how to handle data in a smarter way. Thanks to modern methodologies, building a unified platform that aligns finance and risk no longer requires a rip-and-replace process that can disrupt operations. As with any enterprise initiative, it’s best to take a phased approach.

Best practices in creating a unified data platform

Start by identifying a chief data officer (CDO) who has strategic responsibility for the unified platform, including data governance, quality, architecture, and analytics. The CDO oversees the initiative, represents all constituencies, and ensures that the new data architecture serves the interests of all stakeholders.

Next, define a unified set of terms that satisfies both your finance and risk constituencies while addressing regulatory requirements. This creates a common language across the enterprise so all stakeholders clearly understand what the data means. Make sure all stakeholders have an opportunity to weigh in and explain their perspective of the data early on because certain terms can mean different things to finance and risk folks.

In designing your platform, take advantage of new technologies that make previous IT models predicated on compute-intensive risk modeling a thing of the past. For example, in-memory computing now enables you to integrate all information and analytic processes in memory, so you can perform calculations on-the-fly and deliver results in real time. Advanced event stream processing lets you run analytics against transaction data as it’s posting, so you can analyze and act on events as they happen.

Such technologies bring integration, speed, flexibility, and access to finance and risk data. They eliminate the need to move data to data marts and reconcile data to meet user requirements. Now a single finance and risk data warehouse can be flexible and comprehensive enough to serve many masters.

Join our webinar with Risk.net on 7 October, 2015 to learn best practices and benefits of deploying an integrated finance and risk platform.

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About Mike Russo

Mike Russo, Senior Industry Principal – Financial Services Mike has 30 years experience in the Financial Services/ Financial Software industries. His experience includes stints as Senior Auditor for the Irving Trust Co., NY; Manager of the International Department at Barclays Bank of New York; and 14 years as CFO for Nordea Bank’s, New York City branch –a full service retail/commercial bank. Mike also served on Nordea’s Credit, IT, and Risk Committees. Mike’s financial software experience includes roles as a Senior Banking Consultant with Sanchez Computer Associates and Manager of Global Business Solutions (focused on sale of financial/risk management solutions) with Thomson Financial. Prior to joining SAP, Mike was a regulator with the Federal Reserve Bank in Charlotte, where he was responsible for the supervision of large commercial banking organizations in the Southeast with a focus on market/credit/operational risk management. Joined SAP 8years ago.