Your Best Brand Advocates: Employees With Passion

Olesya Tarasenko

When I think about developing brand advocates, customers are the ones who most often come to mind. However, after reading a recent blog post from one of my millennial peers, I was reminded of how important it is to have your most passionate employees serve as ambassadors of the purpose of your business as well. After all, they are the most organic sources of your brand promotion, both within and outside of your organization—especially if you are a purpose-driven company.

Why passion at work matters

To understand this concept better, let’s look at why passion at work matters and how that ties into purpose. Here are a few reasons why it is important to help your employees to find passion in every aspect of their lives, including their work and career:

  • Passion triggers personal and professional growth. When people follow their passion, I believe they automatically become growth-oriented and naturally tend to take on more challenging tasks. The achievement of tasks leads to greater success, both personally and professionally.
  • Passionate people strive to be their best. When passion inspires people, they work harder because they are more personally involved. This also seems to motivate them to make things happen even when a situation seems impossible.
  • Passion teaches people to tolerate uncertainty and discomfort. When people are inspired, they can tolerate a lot more ambiguity and insecurity.

More and more, passion is a quality that many dynamic companies now want to encourage in their employees. And when the passion is fired up in employees, the logical next step is to encourage them to turn that passion into projects that support a company’s purpose.

Turn passion into value

Back in 2010, Steve Jobs said Apple’s core value was the belief that people with passion can change the world for the better. He essentially was talking about purpose-driven marketing and how employees’ passions can make a difference in a company.

So how can you encourage passion in your company? Here are three simple steps you can take:

  1. Learn about your employees’ passions. Understanding what your employees are passionate about helps managers get to know them better on a more personal level. This in turn can lead to conversations that are more individually tailored and meaningful for employees.
  1. Develop a “driver profile” for each employee. Creating a profile of what drives your employees can help you quickly see where their passions can align with your company’s purpose.
  1. Launch “find your passion” programs within your organization. Once you understand what drives your employees, you can help them create “passion projects” that would interest them and nourish your company’s purpose. 

What are passion projects? They are simply projects that people feel excited about working on because they align with their own passions and purpose. For example, an Autism at Work program within your company would be a great passion project for someone who has an autistic child. Or Back-to-Work initiatives could encourage women who have returned to the workforce after having children help others who are just starting that process.

These are brilliant ways to encourage your employees to build a connection with your company’s purpose. These projects may be outside of the typical scope of a position or job responsibilities, but they are still aligned with the big-picture objectives of your organization.

Passion creates more passion

When employees are connected to a company’s purpose through passion projects at work, the sources that feed your company’s purpose initiatives multiply, creating a long-lasting natural source of nourishment. And when you encourage your employees to link their passions with meaningful projects at work, you start to build stronger connections between them and your company.

In essence, it is pretty simple: Make employees’ passions a priority of your business and you will soon find your business’s purpose among your employees’ priorities.

This blog is part of our Millennials on Purpose series. To learn more about SAP’s higher purpose to help the world run better and improve people’s lives, visit sap.com/purpose.

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Olesya Tarasenko

About Olesya Tarasenko

Olesya Tarasenko is an HR Early Talent at SAP, currently finishing her final rotation in the HR Operations, Cloud Services, team in Prague, Czech Republic. With her multicultural background and diverse HR experiences, including international, Olesya aims to promote personal and professional development and help employees reach their full potential at work. Olesya holds a Master’s degree in Human Resource Development from Villanova University in Pennsylvania and is passionate about continuous learning, innovation, and simplification.

Corporate Social Responsibility: More Than A Checkbox On An Annual Report

Gergi Abboud

I know from first-hand experience what it means to be displaced.

Displaced from everything—your family, your routine, your possessions, your basic amenities. Everything. While I experienced a fraction of what some refugees go through today, nevertheless, it was devastating for my parents and terribly hard for me as a child.

Those images and experiences remain with me. And they serve as an important reality check to remind me of how hard life can get for no fault of your own making. But I was lucky. I had the opportunity to go back to my community, to my country and be welcomed by them. Many refugees today face challenges in developing their own potential and returning to their homes.

As the world faces increasing social, political and economic dilemmas, never before has corporate social responsibility (CSR) been more relevant to businesses as it is today. Business growth is directly linked to smart investments in CSR—which also helps attract and retain customers and top talent.

And perhaps, most importantly, because businesses today are defined by their people, it becomes critical for organizations to support causes that are close to the hearts of their people.

Aligning business objectives with a greater purpose

CSR is no longer a mere checkbox on an annual report. Traditionally perceived as a tool to seek stakeholder approval and trusted brand recognition, CSR has now evolved to become one of the strategic pillars for holistic business growth.

Doing ‘good’ is not only about giving back to community and needs to be an organizational quest for finding purpose that aligns with business objectives. Only then can it leave lasting value and impact for those who receive it. And the ones involved in extending it.

An imbalance of opportunity and need

We live in world of contrasts. People are often polarized between having opportunity and not. A good example of this is the ongoing digital transformation that is sweeping the business world.

For example, Gartner predicts that the region’s IT market in the region continues to grow at 2% in 2017, presenting strong technology job opportunities. Among companies in the Middle East and North Africa, 43% are looking for Junior Executives, according to Bayt.com. And the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia alone is short 37,000 ICT professionals. Similarly, the Saudi Communications and Information Technology Commission states that Saudi Arabia is short of a cumulative 37,000 ICT professionals from 2014-2017.

Potentially, this trend means that all markets will need a steady supply of core computing and coding skills to support this growth—which means more jobs. However, the reality remains far from ideal.

As per statistics from Bayt.com and YouGov, youth unemployment in the Middle East and North Africa is among the highest in the world—23 percent, which is nearly double the global average of 13%. However, that is not due to a lack of workers—it’s due to a lack of workers with the right skills.

Solving real world problems with skilled volunteering

To help address this, let’s think of ways organizations can contribute to lasting social impact. One key way Skilled Volunteering, which allows organizations to harness specifically their skill sets and strengths to add value to CSR initiatives. It helps bridge the social ‘needs’ gap as well as address other real-world problems. And a great live example of this is the Refugee Code Week (RCW).

It uses skilled volunteering to alleviate not only the current, but the future of the refugee situation.  It looks at providing refugees with access to coding literacy. To me, this is the closest thing to a super power than can be taught in today’s digital age. Coding literacy can help empower refugees to become sustainable and employable, and in turn help empower other young refugees in the long run.

Turning refugee settlements into recruitment grounds

How exactly is RCW solving real-world problems? Most obviously, it helps address the refugee condition, giving them hope and empowering a better future for them based on education. It also helps address another serious challenge facing companies and nations today—a crippling paucity of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) skills. CSR initiatives such as RCW serve as the perfect bridge, leapfrogging literacy into employability.

Particularly, coding literacy happens to be the rare skill, that can be taught in a minimal timeframe (as little as 16 weeks) while making people immediately employable. While those being supported gain the necessary skills, companies on the other hand can tap into this massive refugee talent pool and meet their ICT skills shortfall. And the success of our first Bootcamp, with nearly 100% placement of all trainees including refugees, stands testament to the viability of this model.

Education bears the torch

The impact of the refugee situation has been monumental on their lives. Many refugees are not optimistic about their future, and are calling on the global community to come together to find practical solutions to education and careers. However, after volunteering myself, and seeing the heartbreaking situation first hand, I passionately feel that the entire weight of changing the refugee situation hinges on education. Having heard countless moving stories from the camps, I’ve see that the hope in peoples’ hearts is born from one of their most precious possessions carried on them even through displacement—their high school diplomas and educational degrees.

And this gives hope to us as well, to help turn their resentment and negativity into productive time spent to learn skills that can help them integrate better into the community. It gives us direction as corporates, to look at the refugee pool as untapped intellectual potential that can help solve the shortage of ICT skills in the global economy.

And the end objective, is to see these young refugees and youth become social innovators, solving social problems not just with their skills and mindset, but with hope and conviction in their hearts.

With thanks to Batoul Husseini, Global Lead for Refugee Code Week.

For more on this topic, see Can The Social Enterprise Reshape Big Business?

This article originally appeared on Forbes SAPVoice.

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Gergi Abboud

About Gergi Abboud

Gergi Abboud is the Managing Director of the Gulf, North Africa, Levant, and Pakistan regions at SAP. He is responsible for developing the company’s in-country presence and growth strategy, as well as
sales, planning, and marketing activities across these regions. Connect with him on LinkedIn or Twitter @gergiabboud.

Muru Walks A Pathway To The Future

Rick Price

When you think about office supplies, you probably think about things like the reams of paper it takes to get business done. But to Indigenous communities in Australia, that paper is a pathway to equality and a brighter future through an Indigenous-owned company called Muru Office Supplies.

Muru means pathway

Muru CEO Mitchell Ross explains that in the language of his people, Muru means “pathway”: “I’m an Indigenous man myself, and going into business… there was a huge drive for me to give back to other Indigenous people, so part of our vision as an organization is to create a pathway for the next generation of Indigenous people.” Ross explains that Muru gives part of its profits back to Indigenous community programs and has strong Indigenous employment goals.

Challenging history, new opportunities

This is a moment of opportunity for businesses like Muru. Challenged by a history that has often left First Australians behind, the Australian government a year ago created an Indigenous Procurement Policy. In its first year, the government awarded A$284.2 million in contracts to 493 Indigenous businesses. At the same time, many large Australian businesses are finding both purpose and profit in partnering with and buying from Indigenous suppliers. This policy is potentially even more powerful when combined with innovative, cloud-based procurement technology. The opportunity is ripe for smaller, Indigenous businesses like Muru to partner with other suppliers and also to get on the radar of larger buyers.

The power of the business network

Muru has found an expert partner in Complete Office Supplies or COS, Australia’s largest family-owned office products supplier, which has 41 years of experience. At SAP Ariba Live in Sydney in August, COS’s Sarah Trueman explained: “Over the years, we’ve helped Indigenous-owned small businesses, whether distributing their product or helping with logistics and services.” And a partnership with COS can help small Indigenous companies compete with larger organizations: “We support Muru Office Supplies with logistics, with supply chain, customer service, and IT, to make sure that they have the same service level as a company the size of COS.”

Iron…and paper

This effort is putting Muru in a position to work with Fortescue, the world’s fourth-largest iron ore producer. Chelsea Gray, Fortescue’s procurement systems and services manager explains: “Ending Aboriginal disparity has always been a core part of Fortescue.” Beginning in 2011, Fortescue’s Billion Opportunities program has awarded nearly A$2 billion in contracts to over 100 Aboriginal-owned businesses and joint ventures, including Muru.

COS has been a vendor of Fortescue for many years and saw an opportunity to build Muru’s capability by forming the joint venture Muru Office Supplies (MOS). MOS was successful in an open tender to provide Fortescue’s stationery requirements a few years back. COS’s Sarah Trueman says “the joint venture with Muru has been very successful and has resulted in MOS winning further business.”

The digital pathway

Muru, COS, and Fortescue are linked through technology that automates the procurement process and keeps business moving on the pathway between the three companies. Ross says that helps Muru fulfill its purpose in several ways: “It really comes down to streamlining processes for our customers and our buyers, so it reduces the administration costs, particularly in the high-transaction environment that we’re in. It reduces the human error rate because of the integration and automation that’s involved; it’s extremely helpful.” That helps Muru stay competitive, build its credibility, and grow so it can help more people.

SAP Ariba president Alex Atzberger notes: “Across procurement, we see people trying to tackle issues that impact the global supply chain such as slavery, poverty, and diversity. But they are struggling because they lack visibility and data on their suppliers. We can help deliver the intelligence and transparency they need to manage these challenges and effect change.”

The value of purpose

Including Indigenous businesses in procurement benefits companies around the globe. Atzberger points out: “Procurement is in a unique position to address these issues and, beyond saving money and creating efficiencies, improve lives.” Ariba vice president, products and innovation, Padmini Ranganathan points out: “Companies have seen value, cost efficiencies, and have enhanced their brand reputation.” Trueman agrees, saying it brings COS and its employees: “a sense of pride that we are helping Indigenous communities and giving back. As Muru talks about providing education to small children in these communities it’s really touching, it really makes you want to do more.”

Muru’s Ross adds: “As an Indigenous person, it’s easy to think about doing business with a purpose. It’s who we are as a people, so for other organizations and other buyers and suppliers out there, think about the bigger picture and about the world you want to live in, and come up with a purpose that you’re happy to strive towards.”

Interested in the ways procurement can help you make a difference? Click here for more stories like this one.

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Rick Price

About Rick Price

Rick Price is an Emmy Award-winning journalist who now works at SAP, where he tells stories of customers’ digital transformation.

Human Skills for the Digital Future

Dan Wellers and Kai Goerlich

Technology Evolves.
So Must We.


Technology replacing human effort is as old as the first stone axe, and so is the disruption it creates.
Thanks to deep learning and other advances in AI, machine learning is catching up to the human mind faster than expected.
How do we maintain our value in a world in which AI can perform many high-value tasks?


Uniquely Human Abilities

AI is excellent at automating routine knowledge work and generating new insights from existing data — but humans know what they don’t know.

We’re driven to explore, try new and risky things, and make a difference.
 
 
 
We deduce the existence of information we don’t yet know about.
 
 
 
We imagine radical new business models, products, and opportunities.
 
 
 
We have creativity, imagination, humor, ethics, persistence, and critical thinking.


There’s Nothing Soft About “Soft Skills”

To stay ahead of AI in an increasingly automated world, we need to start cultivating our most human abilities on a societal level. There’s nothing soft about these skills, and we can’t afford to leave them to chance.

We must revamp how and what we teach to nurture the critical skills of passion, curiosity, imagination, creativity, critical thinking, and persistence. In the era of AI, no one will be able to thrive without these abilities, and most people will need help acquiring and improving them.

Anything artificial intelligence does has to fit into a human-centered value system that takes our unique abilities into account. While we help AI get more powerful, we need to get better at being human.


Download the executive brief Human Skills for the Digital Future.


Read the full article The Human Factor in an AI Future.


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Dan Wellers

About Dan Wellers

Dan Wellers is founder and leader of Digital Futures at SAP, a strategic insights and thought leadership discipline that explores how digital technologies drive exponential change in business and society.

Kai Goerlich

About Kai Goerlich

Kai Goerlich is the Chief Futurist at SAP Innovation Center network His specialties include Competitive Intelligence, Market Intelligence, Corporate Foresight, Trends, Futuring and ideation.

Share your thoughts with Kai on Twitter @KaiGoe.heif Futu

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Finance And HR: Friends Or Foes? Shifting To A Collaborative Mindset

Richard McLean

Part 1 in the 3-part “Finance and HR Collaboration” series

In my last blog, I challenged you to think of collaboration as the next killer app, citing a recent study by Oxford Economics sponsored by SAP. The study clearly explains how corporate performance improves when finance actively engages in collaboration with other business functions.

As a case in point, consider finance and HR. Both are being called on to work more collaboratively with each other – and the broader business – to help achieve a shared vision for the company. In most organizations, both have undergone a transformation to extend beyond operational tasks and adopt a more strategic focus, opening the door to more collaboration. As such, both have assumed three very important roles in the company – business partner, change agent, and steward. In this post, I’ll illustrate how collaboration can enable HR and finance to be more effective business partners.

Making the transition to focus on broader business objectives

My colleague Renata Janini Dohmen, senior vice president of HR for SAP Asia Pacific Japan, credits a changing mindset for both finance and HR as key to enabling the transition away from our traditional roles to be more collaborative. She says, “For a long time, people in HR and finance were seen as opponents. HR was focused on employees and how to motivate, encourage, and cheer on the workforce. Finance looked at the numbers and was a lot more cautious and possibly more skeptical in terms of making an investment. Today, both areas have made the transition to take on a more holistic perspective. We are pursuing strategies and approaching decisions based on what delivers the best return on investment for the company’s assets, whether those assets are monetary or non-monetary. This mindset shift plays a key role in how finance and HR execute the strategic imperatives of the company,” she notes.

Viewing joint decisions from a completely different lens

I agree with Renata. This mindset change has certainly impacted the way I make decisions. If I’m just focused on controlling costs and assessing expenditures, I’ll evaluate programs and ideas quite differently than if I’m thinking about the big picture.

For example, there’s an HR manager in our organization who runs Compensation and Benefits. She approaches me regularly with great ideas. But those ideas cost money. In the past, I was probably more inclined to look at those conversations from a tactical perspective. It was easy for me to simply say, “No, we can’t afford it.”

Now I look at her ideas from a more strategic perspective. I think, “What do we want our culture to be in the years ahead? Are the benefits packages she is proposing perhaps the right ones to get us there? Are they family friendly? Are they relevant for people in today’s world? Will they make us an employer of choice?” I quite enjoy the rich conversations we have about the impact of compensation and benefits design on the culture we want to create. Now, I see our relationship as much more collaborative and jointly invested in attracting and retaining the best people who will ultimately deliver on the company strategy. It’s a completely different lens.

Defining how finance and HR align to the company strategy

Renata and I believe that greater collaboration between finance and HR is a critical success factor. How can your organization achieve this shift? “Once the organization has clearly defined what role finance and HR must play and how they fundamentally align to the company strategy, then it’s more natural to structure them in a way to support such transformation,” Renata explains.

Technology plays an important role in our ability to successfully collaborate. Looking back, finance and HR were heavily focused on our own operational areas because everything we did tended to consume more time – just keeping the lights on and taking care of our basic responsibilities. Now, through a more efficient operating model with shared services, standard operating procedures, and automation, we can both be more business-focused and integrated. As a result, we’re able to collaborate in more meaningful ways to have a positive impact on business outcomes.

In our next blog, we’ll look at how finance and HR can work together as agents of change.

For a deeper dive, download the Oxford Economics study sponsored by SAP.

Follow SAP Finance online: @SAPFinance (Twitter)LinkedIn | FacebookYouTube

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Richard McLean

About Richard McLean

Richard McLean, regional CFO for SAP Asia Pacific Japan, oversees all key finance and administrative functions for field and regional headquarters, supporting more than 16,000 employees. He has more than 20 years of experience in senior finance roles with leading global companies across a range of industries, including financial services, investment banking, automotive, and IT. He joined SAP in 2008.