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Achieving Gender Equity In The Mobile Industry

Patricia Fletcher

As I prepare to talk about transforming equity in the workplace at next month’s Women4Tech Summit at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, I am struck by the importance of words. Words result in action. The wrong words could very well result in the wrong actions.

The first step in any transformation process is awareness. Awareness comes from the realization that change is on the horizon – change that is needed and that will shift the status quo, or generally accepted norms of “how we do things around here.” In order to solve the challenge of increasing representation of women and other under-represented populations, we must first understand the importance of, and the difference between, equity and equality.

Equity and equality are often used interchangeably, yet the two terms have very different meanings. For leaders who are responsible for harnessing all the best available talent, it’s important to understand that distinction. Equality is based on the belief that everyone is created equal and therefore should be treated the same. Equity considers various differences in barriers and strengths in demographic groups and aims to give members of those groups what they need to be successful.

Inequality and inequity in experience, opportunity, power, and influence plagues many under-represented groups across most, if not all, industries. Awareness provides a catalyst for change, leading a person to move to the next step, driven by a personal desire to take part in the transformation. Yet when it comes to transforming the dearth of qualified women in industry and leadership, leaders tend to see that personal desire manifest into activities that fall short of moving the needle. The impact isn’t there.

Rather than repeating inefficient and ineffective programs aimed at achieving equality for women, a shift in focus—one that requires equity for every member of the workforce—is required. Only then can we all get on the right track.

Gender inequity in the mobile industry

Women comprise half the world’s population, and in many geographies, half of the workforce. Considering that women are responsible for 80% to 90% of all consumer buying decisions, it is hard to argue against the fact that women hold significant economic buying power. Yet the dearth of women in technology-intensive industries remains a black eye on industry, although many act as if this lack of movement is somehow the fault of women themselves.

There is a lot at stake if women continue to experience inequity and inequality in the workplace. By now, many have seen McKinsey’s report, which states $12 billion dollars would be added to the economy today if the women in today’s workforce were paid on par with their male counterparts. That is more than the combined GDPs of Japan, France, and the UK.

Despite the number of women in the world and the potential for economic growth if women were fully engaged, the numbers that really matter remain low: With women comprising roughly 25% of the technology workforce and holding less than 11% of corporate board positions in the industry, the progress made is simply not enough.

In a study of low- and middle-income countries, GSMA found that women in emerging economies are 38% less likely to own a mobile phone than men. Without access to information and to a broader outside community, women are handicapped. Without women in key development, marketing, strategy, and sales positions, these numbers may never fully represent the potential of the mobile industry.

Looking at the problem through the wrong lens

Companies spend billions of dollars on programs designed to address gender inequity within their own workforce. The catalyst for many of these programs is legal, although some are more driven by philanthropy and desire to do the right thing. Some initiatives offer courses that help women learn to negotiate, lead, and network like men. Many events include only women, and men, along with women who are not invited, feel left out. The needle doesn’t move, and women continue to leave their jobs at twice the rate of men, costing companies 200% of each lost talent.

Shifting the focus improves outcomes

Where’s the discrepancy? Why are these thoughtfully designed, well-meaning, beautifully executed events not working?

Let’s go back to where we started in this article: Transformation starts with an awareness that catalyzes a shift in how a status quo is viewed—one that questions ineffective, inefficient, and irrelevant norms.

Research from Dr. Elisabeth Kelan of Cranfield University found that the glass ceiling is most prevalent and damning at the middle-manager level. Instead of “fixing” women, as many programs attempt to do, we must change how we address gender inequity and inequality in the workplace by shifting our focus from “this is a women’s problem” to “this is about harnessing all the best and available talent.” After all, who is responsible for the vast majority of attracting, recruiting, engaging, developing, and advancing that talent? You guessed it: middle managers.

I look forward to sharing ideas on how every leader and manager in the mobile technology industry can engage all the best talent by eradicating unconscious bias across the nine key decisions points that can either create or hinder equity and equality in the workplace.

Hope to see you in Barcelona!

For more on the importance of workplace diversity, see Diversity For The Greater Good And As A Smart Business Strategy.

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IoT Can Keep You Healthy — Even When You Sleep [VIDEO]

Christine Donato

Today the Internet of Things is revamping technology. IoT image from American Geniuses.jpg

Smart devices speak to each other and work together to provide the end user with a better product experience.

Coinciding with this change in technology is a change in people. We’ve transitioned from a world of people who love processed foods and french fries to people who eat kale chips and Greek yogurt…and actually like it.

People are taking ownership of their well-being, and preventative care is at the forefront of focus for both physicians and patients. Fitness trackers alert wearers of the exact number of calories burned from walking a certain number of steps. Mobile apps calculate our perfect nutritional balance. And even while we sleep, people are realizing that it’s important to monitor vitals.

According to research conducted at Harvard University, proper sleep patterns bolster healthy side effects such as improved immune function, a faster metabolism, preserved memory, and reduced stress and depression.

Conversely, the Harvard study determined that lack of sleep can negatively affect judgement, mood, and the ability retain information, as well as increase the risk of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and even premature death.

Through the Internet of Things, researchers can now explore sleep patterns without the usual sleep labs and movement-restricting electrode wires. And with connected devices, individuals can now easily monitor and positively influence their own health.

EarlySense, a startup credited with the creation of continuous patient monitoring solutions focused on early detection of patient deterioration, mid-sleep falls, and pressure ulcers, began with a mission to prevent premature and preventable deaths.

Without constant monitoring, patients with unexpected clinical deterioration may be accidentally neglected, and their conditions can easily escalate into emergency situations.

Motivated by many instances of patients who died from preventable post-elective surgery complications, EarlySense founders created a product that constantly monitors patients when hospital nurses can’t, alerting the main nurse station when a patient leaves his or her bed and could potentially fall, or when a patient’s vital signs drop or rise unexpectedly.

Now EarlySense technology has expanded outside of the hospital realm. The EarlySense wellness sensor, a device connected via the Internet of Things, mobile solutions, and supported by SAP HANA Cloud Platform, monitors all vital signs while a person sleeps. The device is completely wireless and lies subtly underneath one’s mattress. The sensor collects all mechanical vibrations that the patient’s body emits while sleeping, continuously monitoring heart and respiratory rates.

Watch this short video to learn more about how the EarlySense wellness sensor works:

The result is faster diagnoses with better treatments and outcomes. Sleep issues can be identified and addressed; individuals can use the data collected to make adjustments in diet or exercise habits; and those on heavy pain medications can monitor the way their bodies react to the medication. In addition, physicians can use the data collected from the sensor to identify patient health problems before they escalate into an emergency situation.

Connected care is opening the door for a new way to practice health. Through connected care apps that link people with their doctors, fitness trackers that measure daily activity, and sensors like the EarlySense wellness sensor, today’s technology enables people and physicians to work together to prevent sickness and accidents before they occur. Technology is forever changing the way we live, and in turn we are living longer, healthier lives.

To learn how SAP HANA Cloud Platform can affect your business, visit It&Me.

For more stories, join me on Twitter.

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About Christine Donato

Christine Donato is a Senior Integrated Marketing Specialist at SAP. She is an accomplished project manager and leader of multiple marketing and sales enablement campaigns and events, that supported a multi million euro business.

Zhena’s Gypsy Tea Brews Sustainable Growth On Cloud ERP

David Trites

Recently I had the pleasure of hosting a podcast with Paula Muesse, COO and CFO of Zhena’s Gypsy Tea, a small, organic, fair-trade tea company based in California, and Ursula Ringham from SAP. We talked about some of the business challenges Zhena’s faces and how the company’s ERP solution helped spur growth and digital transformation.

Small but complex business

~ERP helped Zhena’s sustain growthZhena’s has grown from one person (Zhena Muzyka) selling hand-packed tea from a cart, into a thriving small business that puts quality, sustainability, and fair trade first. And although the company is small its business is complex.

For starters, tea isn’t grown in the United States, so Zhena’s has to maintain and import inventory from multiple warehouses around the world. Some of their tea blends have up to 14 ingredients, and each one has a different lead time. That makes demand-planning difficult. In addition, the FDA and US Customs require designated ingredients be traced and treated a certain way to comply with regulations.

Being organic and fair trade also makes things more complicated. Zhena’s has to pass an annual organic compliance audit for all products and processing facilities. And all products need to be traceable back to the farms where the tea was grown and picked to ensure the workers (mostly women) are paid fair wages.

Sustainable growth

Prior to implementing its new ERP system, Zhena’s was using a mix of tools like QuickBooks, Excel, and paper to manage the business. But to sustain growth and ensure future success, the company had to make some changes. Zhena’s needed an integrated software solution that could handle all facets of the business. It needed a tool that could help with cost control and profitability analysis and facilitate complex reporting and regulatory requirements.

The SAP Business ByDesign solution was the perfect choice. The cloud-based ERP solution reduced both business and IT costs, simplified processes from demand planning to accounting, and enabled mobile access and real-time reporting.

Check out the podcast to hear more about how Zhena’s successfully transformed its business by moving to SAP Business ByDesign.

 This article originally appeared on SAP Business Trends.

Building a successful company is hard work. SAP’s affordable solutions for small and midsize companies are designed to make it easier. Simple to install and use, SAP SME Solutions help you automate and integrate your business processes to give real-time, actionable insights. So you can make decisions on the spot. Find out how Run Simple can work for you. Visit sap.com/sme.

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About David Trites

David Trites is a Director of SAP Global Marketing. He is responsible for producing interesting and compelling customer stories that will humanize the SAP brand, support sales and marketing teams across SAP, and increase the awareness of SAP in key markets.

3 Ways Robots Will Co-Evolve with Humans

Christopher Koch

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About Christopher Koch

Christopher Koch is the Editorial Director of the SAP Center for Business Insight. He is an experienced publishing professional, researcher, editor, and writer in business, technology, and B2B marketing. Share your thoughts with Chris on Twitter @Ckochster.

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Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Melissa Friedman

About Melissa Friedman

Melissa Friedman is a senior marketing manager of Global Partner Operations at SAP. She manages SAP Virtual Agency, a multi-language, online demand-generation platform for SAP partners. In her spare time, Melissa is a professional photographer who specializes in wedding, bar/bat mitzvah, and portrait photography. Follow Melissa on Twitter and LinkedIn, or view her photography work.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

About Adam Winfield

Adam Winfield writes about technology, how it's affecting industries, how it's affecting businesses, and how it's affecting people.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Gavin Mooney

About Gavin Mooney

Gavin Mooney is a utilities industry solution specialist for SAP. From a background in Engineering and IT, Gavin has been working in the utilities industry with SAP products for nearly 15 years. He has had the privilege of working with a number of Electricity, Gas and Water Utilities across the globe to implement SAP’s Industry Solution for Utilities. He now works with utilities to help them identify the best way to run simple and run better with SAP's latest products. Gavin loves to network and build lasting business relationships and is passionate about cleantech and the fundamental transformation currently shaking up the utilities industry.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Kris Hansen

About Kris Hansen

Kris Hansen is senior principal, Financial Services for SAP Canada. He is focused on understanding the financial services industry and identifying new and interesting digital opportunities that create disruptive business value.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

About Wilson Zhu

Wilson Zhu is a Marketing Manager at SAP. He focuses on the topic of Digital Supply Chain and IoT. Follow him on Twitter: @thezhu.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Roger Noia

About Roger Noia

Roger Noia is the director of Solution Marketing, SAP Jam Collaboration, at SAP. He is responsible for product marketing and sales enablement for our dedicated sales team as well as the broader SAP sales force selling SAP Jam.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Drew Schiller

About Drew Schiller

Drew Schiller co-founded and serves as the Chief Executive Officer of Validic, the leading digital health platform for connecting patient-generated data from apps, wearables, and in-home medical devices to the healthcare system. At Validic, Drew leads the corporate strategy, drives key day-to-day initiatives, and works closely with senior executives at partner organizations to stay ahead of the innovation curve.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Carolyn Beal

About Carolyn Beal

Carolyn Beal is senior director of Solution Marketing for Social Software at SAP. Her specialties include product marketing, marketing communications, CRM, and demand generation.

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awareness