Refugee Code Week: Programming A Future Perspective

SAP News Center

Refugee Code Week opens up new perspectives for refugees and displaced youth throughout the Middle East.

“Come in!” Nisreen’s father says cheerfully, as he invites us in from the dusty street. Inside his small house, the air is cool and smells of fresh tea. The tiny rooms are clean and lovingly decorated. Grandmother and niece are already waiting for us in the living room. It looks almost like their home in Syria did before the war, they tell us. Outside, laughing children play tag. It’s a little paradise they have created for themselves here.

But not all is as it seems at first glance: Nisreen Abu-Salou, 37, is a Syrian refugee, and the walls of the house are made of sheet metal. She and her father live there alone, her mother having since returned to Syria to Nisreen’s brothers and sisters. They have no idea how the rest of the family is doing. Contact with the outside world is only possible sporadically. Nisreen’s new “home” is Al Zaatari, a refugee camp in Jordan. It is the largest refugee camp in the Middle East, and with 80,000 inhabitants, the second largest in the world.

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Nisreen Abu-Salou with her family

Back in Syria, she worked as a teacher and taught children from grade five up to graduation. Her curiosity for all things new was her constant companion. Her eyes light up just reminiscing about it. And now she has the chance to learn programming.

Nisreen has been taking part in Refugee Code Week, an initiative sponsored by SAP in collaboration with the United Nations Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) and Galway Education Center. The aim of the project is to introduce refugees in the Middle East to the basics of computer programming. The courses were held in Jordan, Egypt, Lebanon, and Turkey.

Skills for now and the future

There are currently millions of refugees of all ages stuck in camps throughout war zones and hosting countries. Despite their wide range of skills and qualifications, most of these people have no choice but to idle away the day. For children, the biggest issue is the lack of access to education, especially beyond the elementary level.

The IT industry in this region, on the other hand, needs highly trained specialists to drive digital transformation and help secure the region’s long-term economic growth. Saudi Arabia alone already had a shortfall of some 30,000 IT professionals. Meanwhile, it is estimated that businesses and governments will invest around $260 billion in IT in the Middle East and Africa (MEA) in 2016 alone.

So what could be more obvious than to tap that tremendous motivation of the refugees – especially of the girls – and invest in a better future, right here and now?

The results

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Together with 33 partners, this event was able to equip 10,200 participants with coding skills. This infographic gives a detailed overview of the achievements during Refugee Code Week 2016.


The impact of the initiative is particularly evident in the camps nearest the Syrian border in Jordan. Take Amnah, for example, a 12-year-old girl also from the Al Zaatari camp. She says that learning with the special Scratch software is very easy “and a lot of fun, too.”

Some women in the program are students; others are teachers, such as 21-year old Rana. She sees this project as a unique opportunity for girls to shape their future and to develop a perspective, even in a seemingly hopeless environment such as theirs. Participants were taught in groups aged 8 to 11 years and 12 to 17 years. Free online courses were also offered to those who were unable to attend on-site.

Training for hundreds of teachers

The students didn’t just benefit from the pedagogical and didactical quality of the Scratch teaching program, which is very practice-oriented and thus capable of maintaining the learners’ enthusiasm even through the phases of dry theory. They also benefited from the high level of motivation of their teachers. 2,439 teachers have been trained by experts and supported by numerous volunteers. And they are not only coming from the refugee communities; volunteers also come from the host countries who will also forward their new digital knowledge to local youth.

“Hence the importance of ‘Train-the-Trainer’ events, where master instructors empower both refugees and local youth to become the next expert coding teachers,” explains Claire Gillissen-Duval, director of SAP Corporate Social Responsibility for EMEA and global lead of Africa and Refugee Code Weeks. “Leveraging freely accessible materials and teaching tools, Train-the-Trainer events provide a sound, replicable structure for inter-group knowledge sharing, unlocking the potential of people to serve as resources for each other.”

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Children living at Al Zaatari

The entire model builds on the success of Africa Code Week. In its second year now, the event, together with hundreds of partners, passed on coding skills to 427,000 children, teenagers, and young adults in Africa. Many of those participants now have career perspectives they never would have dreamed possible before. This is also the experience of the 10,200 participants of Refugee Code Week: Whether as employees in companies or as freelancers: their skills are in demand and can be used anywhere in the world – especially, of course, in their home countries, where they hope to be soon able to return and support economic recovery.

Direct from school to career

For some of the Refugee Code Week participants, the dream of a career becomes true even sooner. The 90 best “Master Class” students are selected to participate in a special “bootcamp” training program from non-profit partner RBK (formerly ReBootKamp). Of these, at least 30 can look forward to a job offer from the partner network upon completion.

Fatima Himmamy has already participated in a RBK training. The 26-year-old from Aleppo, who has already completed a four-year computer studies program, describes the initiative as one of the best experiences of her life. Being a teacher in the project is much more than just a job to her, though. It has given her a different perspective and has changed her life in the camp.

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Fatima Himmamy

The project has given her new drive, and lots of satisfaction, because passing her knowledge to other women and girls is a cause that’s particularly dear to her heart. “I love what I’m doing here,” she says.

Refugee Code Week demonstrates how people – even those in need – can turn potential opportunities into a better future. In the end, it all comes down to determination. And when it comes to determination, the participating girls and women are in a class of their own.

For more stories of how technology education can turn young lives around, see Bringing New Educational Opportunities To Rwandan Youth.

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Digitization Is Crucial To Achieve UN Global Goals

Daniel Schmid

Concern, hope, enthusiasm: This was the mixture of sentiments that I perceived during the World Economic Forum (WEF) Sustainable Development Impact Summit in New York City last month.

More than 700 leaders from more than 70 countries took part—including government, business, international organizations, research centers, and not-for profits. Panelists included Salesforce CEO Marc R. Benioff, Mars president Jean-Christophe Flatin, Roche vice-chairman André S. Hoffmann, and Royal Philips president and CEO Frans van Houten.

Concern

Former U.S. Vice President and Nobel Peace Prize winner* Al Gore pointed out, in a panel discussion titled “Global Progress through Partnerships,” that the past two weeks saw two record-breaking climate-connected storms. Hurricane Harvey crossed the Gulf of Mexico, which was over four degrees warmer than normal, resulting in enormous amounts of rain. The rainfall totals in Houston were a once-every-25,000-years event. The monsoon in South Asia also brought 70 cm more rain than normal, with one-third of Bangladesh underwater.

Gore said, “We are departing the familiar bounds of history as we have known it since civilization began.” In contrast, other areas are experiencing devastating droughts: 80 percent of Portugal is in drought, and 70 large fires have burned in the western part of North America.

These conditions also create climate refugees. “Long before the civil war in Syria started, the worst drought in 900 years of record-keeping destroyed 60 percent of farms. One and a half million climate refugees entered the cities,” Gore pointed out, adding that this is a contributing factor to the war in Syria.

Hope

“But,” Gore added, “we are also meeting in a time of extraordinary and unprecedented hope.” The World Economic Forum was incremental in building the success of the Paris Agreement, and will continue to play a key role in implementing it. “Public private partnerships are the keys to putting in place the solutions we need.”

The day after the U.S. government announced it would leave the Paris Agreement, Gore said, political and business leaders, states, cities, etc., doubled down on their commitment, saying “We are still there!” SAP is one of the companies that is strongly committed to climate action: We plan to be carbon-neutral by 2025.

According to Gore, there are additional reasons for hope: Technology becomes better and cheaper all the time, a phenomenon known as the “cost-down curve.” Gadgets can now be run with wind or solar energy, and efficiency is better than ever. “The Fourth Industrial Revolution is also a sustainability revolution,” Gore said. Technology is key to meeting the sustainable development goals.

This was also consensus in the panel discussion “The Fourth Industrial Revolution: Technology-Driven, Human-Centred”: Panelists emphasized the opportunities technology brings, from artificial intelligence (AI) to improve working conditions to mobile phones in India that enable everyone to play a part in the economy (e.g. have a bank account)—even those who were formerly excluded. For girls in Africa, learning IT and coding skills bring hope for a better life.

My take? It is up to us to ensure that the opportunities technology offers outweigh the risks. To help drive awareness around the sustainable development goals (SDGs) and showcase examples of how IT can help contribute to them, SAP has published an interactive web book and iPad app as well as a free online course on openSAP: “Sustainability through Digital Transformation.”

Enthusiasm

The theme of most of the speeches and discussions I witnessed at the summit was “There is no planet B,” but also “Together we can make it,” meaning that government, public, and private-sector organizations need to cooperate to tackle the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). With partnerships and cooperation, they have the power to create positive economic, social, and environmental value through technology, solutions, and skills.

World Economic Forum founder and executive chairman Klaus Schwab described the summit’s intention: “What is needed is a true agenda for global public-private cooperation, with the objective not to defend individual interests, but to keep the destiny of humankind as a whole in mind.”

As a result of the summit, several major new initiatives that will advance public-private cooperation on the global goals were announced or launched, including:

These initiatives show the will to cooperate and the readiness to act of leaders from all over the world—let us all have a part in tackling the biggest challenges of the planet!

*The Nobel Peace Prize for 2007 was awarded to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and former US Vice President Al Gore for their efforts to obtain and disseminate information about the climate challenge. In Gore’s case, the award was grounded in his tireless campaign to put the climate crisis on the political agenda.

This story originally appeared on the SAP Community.

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Daniel Schmid

About Daniel Schmid

Daniel Schmid was appointed Chief Sustainability Officer at SAP in 2014. Since 2008 he has been engaged in transforming SAP into a role model of a sustainable organization, establishing mid and long term sustainability targets. Linking non-financial and financial performance are key achievements of Daniel and his team.

Defeating Poverty In Ghana, One Shoe At A Time

Michael Kure

Walk a mile in George Kwame Baah’s shoes and you might get an inkling of his remarkable journey. In 11 years, Baah transitioned from a poverty-stricken life in his native Ghana to working as a full-time engineer in the United States, where he is founder and chief product designer of his own footwear e-commerce business, Kwame Baah.

Buying a pair of shoes was too expensive for Baah’s family when he was a child—so he innovated, making his own shoes out of recycled tires.

This experience led him to launch his namesake e-commerce business years later, selling contemporary-designed Ghanaian sandals and shoes across the United States.

Designed to alleviate poverty

Baah designs the footwear at the company’s headquarters in Fort Worth, Texas, but the footwear products are handcrafted by his employees back in Ghana—mainly Baah’s mother, siblings, and some neighbors. Handcrafting these signature shoes enables all to support themselves.

“Kwame Baah shoes are designed to alleviate poverty,” Baah said.

It is the driving force behind Kwame Baah. And the company does so by providing a living wage for its workers in Baah’s Ghanaian hometown.

That’s a big reason why George’s passion to see his business succeed is as strong as his altruism.

Supporting his business, family, and fellow townspeople

George was inspired to launch Kwame Baah in part by his native culture, which values support and neighbors who need financial help. Baah accepts and owns this responsibility unconditionally.

Baah came to the U.S. in 2000 to study engineering, which led to a full-time job. Yet he still chose to enter an already crowded global industry dominated by powerhouse competition such as Nike and Adidas.

That can be challenging. Consumers are generally hesitant to try something new and unbranded. Nevertheless, Kwame Baah has been able to stand out among the competition, thanks to its uniquely stylish design, superior craftsmanship, and materials from Ghana.

Studies show that millennials are more inclined to purchase products from companies doing good for society, and that’s exactly the competitive advantage that George is selling.

“Most of our clients are people looking for something new, something stylish. You get a shoe that is well made and very stylish…that you can’t find on any [other] market,” Baah said. “And then you have a great story behind it—that’s our competitive edge.”

More shoes sold means more people helped

Providing a living wage requires selling a lot of shoes, just as generating awareness and growing sales requires a proven business solution to scale growth. Baah chose the end-to-end an e-commerce solution designed for small and midsize businesses to help his company think ahead in terms of future growth.

“Being able to expand and have all these analytical tools and data at my fingertips [is] what drew me to the technology,” Baah said.

Baah has made the most use of his new technology’s data analytics tool. Data collected from social media tracking helps George make more informed decisions on how to reach his audience and generate further awareness in the marketplace.

Baah expects his new business solution to help his company grow, scale, and operate more efficiently. Every penny of additional profit puts more money into the pockets of the artisans.

Another benefit has been the exposure.

“This digital approach will bring more publicity to the company because retailers we work with see that as a sign of credibility,” Baah said. In fact, since signing on, Kwame Baah footwear has been picked up and sold by the brand, Free People, an exclusive, trendy brand very popular among young people.

George’s story is truly an inspiration to all small business owners: a quality product with universal appeal and an even better purpose. Kwame Baah is a leader in meaningful business success.

Click here to learn more about how SAP Anywhere can help grow your small business.

 

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Michael Kure

About Michael Kure

Michael Kure is the lead copywriter on the Small and Midsize Businesses team and comes to SAP with 15 years of marketing communications, copywriting, and editorial experience.

The Future Will Be Co-Created

Dan Wellers and Timo Elliott

 

Just 3% of companies have completed enterprise digital transformation projects.
92% of those companies have significantly improved or transformed customer engagement.
81% of business executives say platforms will reshape industries into interconnected ecosystems.
More than half of large enterprises (80% of the Global 500) will join industry platforms by 2018.

Link to Sources


Redefining Customer Experience

Many business leaders think of the customer journey or experience as the interaction an individual or business has with their firm.

But the business value of the future will exist in the much broader, end-to-end experiences of a customer—the experience of travel, for example, or healthcare management or mobility. Individual companies alone, even with their existing supplier networks, lack the capacity to transform these comprehensive experiences.


A Network Effect

Rather than go it alone, companies will develop deep collaborative relationships across industries—even with their customers—to create powerful ecosystems that multiply the breadth and depth of the products, services, and experiences they can deliver. Digital native companies like Baidu and Uber have embraced ecosystem thinking from their early days. But forward-looking legacy companies are beginning to take the approach.

Solutions could include:

  • Packaging provider Weig has integrated partners into production with customers co-inventing custom materials.
  • China’s Ping An insurance company is aggressively expanding beyond its sector with a digital platform to help customers manage their healthcare experience.
  • British roadside assistance provider RAC is delivering a predictive breakdown service for drivers by acquiring and partnering with high-tech companies.

What Color Is Your Ecosystem?

Abandoning long-held notions of business value creation in favor of an ecosystem approach requires new tactics and strategies. Companies can:

1.  Dispassionately map the end-to-end customer experience, including those pieces outside company control.

2.  Employ future planning tactics, such as scenario planning, to examine how that experience might evolve.

3.  Identify organizations in that experience ecosystem with whom you might co-innovate.

4.  Embrace technologies that foster secure collaboration and joint innovation around delivery of experiences, such as cloud computing, APIs, and micro-services.

5.  Hire, train for, and reward creativity, innovation, and customer-centricity.


Evolve or Be Commoditized

Some companies will remain in their traditional industry boxes, churning out products and services in isolation. But they will be commodity players reaping commensurate returns. Companies that want to remain competitive will seek out their new ecosystem or get left out in the cold.


Download the executive brief The Future Will be Co-Created.


Read the full article The Future Belongs to Industry-Busting Ecosystems.

Turn insight into action, make better decisions, and transform your business.  Learn how.

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About Dan Wellers

Dan Wellers is founder and leader of Digital Futures at SAP, a strategic insights and thought leadership discipline that explores how digital technologies drive exponential change in business and society.

About Timo Elliott

Timo Elliott is an Innovation Evangelist for SAP and a passionate advocate of innovation, digital business, analytics, and artificial intelligence. He was the eighth employee of BusinessObjects and for the last 25 years he has worked closely with SAP customers around the world on new technology directions and their impact on real-world organizations. His articles have appeared in articles such as Harvard Business Review, Forbes, ZDNet, The Guardian, and Digitalist Magazine. He has worked in the UK, Hong Kong, New Zealand, and Silicon Valley, and currently lives in Paris, France. He has a degree in Econometrics and a patent in mobile analytics. 

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Blockchain: Much Ado About Nothing? How Very Wrong!

Juergen Roehricht

Let me start with a quote from McKinsey, that in my view hits the nail right on the head:

“No matter what the context, there’s a strong possibility that blockchain will affect your business. The very big question is when.”

Now, in the industries that I cover in my role as general manager and innovation lead for travel and transportation/cargo, engineering, construction and operations, professional services, and media, I engage with many different digital leaders on a regular basis. We are having visionary conversations about the impact of digital technologies and digital transformation on business models and business processes and the way companies address them. Many topics are at different stages of the hype cycle, but the one that definitely stands out is blockchain as a new enabling technology in the enterprise space.

Just a few weeks ago, a customer said to me: “My board is all about blockchain, but I don’t get what the excitement is about – isn’t this just about Bitcoin and a cryptocurrency?”

I can totally understand his confusion. I’ve been talking to many blockchain experts who know that it will have a big impact on many industries and the related business communities. But even they are uncertain about the where, how, and when, and about the strategy on how to deal with it. The reason is that we often look at it from a technology point of view. This is a common mistake, as the starting point should be the business problem and the business issue or process that you want to solve or create.

In my many interactions with Torsten Zube, vice president and blockchain lead at the SAP Innovation Center Network (ICN) in Potsdam, Germany, he has made it very clear that it’s mandatory to “start by identifying the real business problem and then … figure out how blockchain can add value.” This is the right approach.

What we really need to do is provide guidance for our customers to enable them to bring this into the context of their business in order to understand and define valuable use cases for blockchain. We need to use design thinking or other creative strategies to identify the relevant fields for a particular company. We must work with our customers and review their processes and business models to determine which key blockchain aspects, such as provenance and trust, are crucial elements in their industry. This way, we can identify use cases in which blockchain will benefit their business and make their company more successful.

My highly regarded colleague Ulrich Scholl, who is responsible for externalizing the latest industry innovations, especially blockchain, in our SAP Industries organization, recently said: “These kinds of use cases are often not evident, as blockchain capabilities sometimes provide minor but crucial elements when used in combination with other enabling technologies such as IoT and machine learning.” In one recent and very interesting customer case from the autonomous province of South Tyrol, Italy, blockchain was one of various cloud platform services required to make this scenario happen.

How to identify “blockchainable” processes and business topics (value drivers)

To understand the true value and impact of blockchain, we need to keep in mind that a verified transaction can involve any kind of digital asset such as cryptocurrency, contracts, and records (for instance, assets can be tangible equipment or digital media). While blockchain can be used for many different scenarios, some don’t need blockchain technology because they could be handled by a simple ledger, managed and owned by the company, or have such a large volume of data that a distributed ledger cannot support it. Blockchain would not the right solution for these scenarios.

Here are some common factors that can help identify potential blockchain use cases:

  • Multiparty collaboration: Are many different parties, and not just one, involved in the process or scenario, but one party dominates everything? For example, a company with many parties in the ecosystem that are all connected to it but not in a network or more decentralized structure.
  • Process optimization: Will blockchain massively improve a process that today is performed manually, involves multiple parties, needs to be digitized, and is very cumbersome to manage or be part of?
  • Transparency and auditability: Is it important to offer each party transparency (e.g., on the origin, delivery, geolocation, and hand-overs) and auditable steps? (e.g., How can I be sure that the wine in my bottle really is from Bordeaux?)
  • Risk and fraud minimization: Does it help (or is there a need) to minimize risk and fraud for each party, or at least for most of them in the chain? (e.g., A company might want to know if its goods have suffered any shocks in transit or whether the predefined route was not followed.)

Connecting blockchain with the Internet of Things

This is where blockchain’s value can be increased and automated. Just think about a blockchain that is not just maintained or simply added by a human, but automatically acquires different signals from sensors, such as geolocation, temperature, shock, usage hours, alerts, etc. One that knows when a payment or any kind of money transfer has been made, a delivery has been received or arrived at its destination, or a digital asset has been downloaded from the Internet. The relevant automated actions or signals are then recorded in the distributed ledger/blockchain.

Of course, given the massive amount of data that is created by those sensors, automated signals, and data streams, it is imperative that only the very few pieces of data coming from a signal that are relevant for a specific business process or transaction be stored in a blockchain. By recording non-relevant data in a blockchain, we would soon hit data size and performance issues.

Ideas to ignite thinking in specific industries

  • The digital, “blockchained” physical asset (asset lifecycle management): No matter whether you build, use, or maintain an asset, such as a machine, a piece of equipment, a turbine, or a whole aircraft, a blockchain transaction (genesis block) can be created when the asset is created. The blockchain will contain all the contracts and information for the asset as a whole and its parts. In this scenario, an entry is made in the blockchain every time an asset is: sold; maintained by the producer or owner’s maintenance team; audited by a third-party auditor; has malfunctioning parts; sends or receives information from sensors; meets specific thresholds; has spare parts built in; requires a change to the purpose or the capability of the assets due to age or usage duration; receives (or doesn’t receive) payments; etc.
  • The delivery chain, bill of lading: In today’s world, shipping freight from A to B involves lots of manual steps. For example, a carrier receives a booking from a shipper or forwarder, confirms it, and, before the document cut-off time, receives the shipping instructions describing the content and how the master bill of lading should be created. The carrier creates the original bill of lading and hands it over to the ordering party (the current owner of the cargo). Today, that original paper-based bill of lading is required for the freight (the container) to be picked up at the destination (the port of discharge). Imagine if we could do this as a blockchain transaction and by forwarding a PDF by email. There would be one transaction at the beginning, when the shipping carrier creates the bill of lading. Then there would be look-ups, e.g., by the import and release processing clerk of the shipper at the port of discharge and the new owner of the cargo at the destination. Then another transaction could document that the container had been handed over.

The future

I personally believe in the massive transformative power of blockchain, even though we are just at the very beginning. This transformation will be achieved by looking at larger networks with many participants that all have a nearly equal part in a process. Today, many blockchain ideas still have a more centralistic approach, in which one company has a more prominent role than the (many) others and often is “managing” this blockchain/distributed ledger-supported process/approach.

But think about the delivery scenario today, where goods are shipped from one door or company to another door or company, across many parties in the delivery chain: from the shipper/producer via the third-party logistics service provider and/or freight forwarder; to the companies doing the actual transport, like vessels, trucks, aircraft, trains, cars, ferries, and so on; to the final destination/receiver. And all of this happens across many countries, many borders, many handovers, customs, etc., and involves a lot of paperwork, across all constituents.

“Blockchaining” this will be truly transformational. But it will need all constituents in the process or network to participate, even if they have different interests, and to agree on basic principles and an approach.

As Torsten Zube put it, I am not a “blockchain extremist” nor a denier that believes this is just a hype, but a realist open to embracing a new technology in order to change our processes for our collective benefit.

Turn insight into action, make better decisions, and transform your business. Learn how.

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Juergen Roehricht

About Juergen Roehricht

Juergen Roehricht is General Manager of Services Industries and Innovation Lead of the Middle and Eastern Europe region for SAP. The industries he covers include travel and transportation; professional services; media; and engineering, construction and operations. Besides managing the business in those segments, Juergen is focused on supporting innovation and digital transformation strategies of SAP customers. With more than 20 years of experience in IT, he stays up to date on the leading edge of innovation, pioneering and bringing new technologies to market and providing thought leadership. He has published several articles and books, including Collaborative Business and The Multi-Channel Company.