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Transforming Learning Starts Today

Alwin Gruenwald

Digital technology is disrupting nearly every industry – from automotive and retail to agriculture, clinical research, transportation, entertainment, and hospitality – and the people who work in them. Car mechanics need to understand digital dashboards. Call center operators should be social media experts well-versed in communicating through Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and Pinterest. Finance directors are searching for ways to get their arms around Big Data. And salespeople are trying to strike a balance between knowing when to pick up the phone and when to use online tools to nurture prospects. “Knowledge is becoming obsolete faster than ever before, while new knowledge emerges,” says Jim Carroll, a speaker, consultant, and author on business transformation.

Senior executives can no longer make every decision – the world is moving too fast. They must rely on the brightest and most-motivated employees on their teams to help predict future needs in the market and to deliver solutions quickly. Unfortunately, those rising stars might not have the skills to get there – at least, not yet. According to Oxford Economics’ “Workforce 2020” study, nearly 40% of North American employees believe that their current job skills will not be adequate in three years, while the majority agree that the need for technology-related skills, especially in analytics and programming, will grow.

However, traditional corporate learning methods, such as classroom training or long-duration e-learning courses, aren’t keeping pace with learning needs and preferences. Managers can send their employees to the Web and let them figure it out on their own, but this free-for-all model may not be effective for most people.

A better approach is to create and facilitate a learning environment that is more accessible, consumable, and real-time for today’s mobile workforce. Here’s how learning is evolving to meet these new pressures:

Micro-learning

Breaking up learning content into bite-size portions of five- or 10-minute chapters can minimize disruptions in productivity and reduce learner fatigue. Micro-learning is perfect for employees of all levels, whether they are learning to write a business plan or getting instruction on installing a new line of air conditioning units for a customer.

Learning as entertainment

To keep learning experiences fresh, fun, and competitive, Canadian telecommunications company TELUS is using gamification. Leaders can spend eight weeks coaching a virtual Olympic speed-skating team and competing against colleagues to earn gold medals. To win, learners must demonstrate leadership behaviors that TELUS values. The company’s training programs are also starting to incorporate virtual reality for a more immersive and emotional experience, which is a great way to approach simulations and role play.

Social learning

Learning platforms that allow employees to exchange ideas and ask questions in a community setting deliver an opportunity for real-time sharing that is common in live classroom environments. “Learning is an emotional experience, and most people don’t want to be alone when they learn,” says Bernd Welz, senior vice president of scale, enablement, and transformation at SAP. In turn, community-based learning may enrich the content in unforeseen ways, sparking novel discussions or interpretations of the material.

User-generated content

The Internet has made it possible for creative minds to share their writing, music, film, and art with mass audiences immediately – and it is doing the same for  education. “What learners value the most today is the raw, user-created content over the highly polished corporate-created content,” says Elliott Masie, founder of The MASIE Center, a think tank focused on learning in the workforce.

Nanodegrees

Employees looking to retrain for a promotion or lateral move don’t have the time to go back to school, unless they are seeking a nanodegree. These short and intensive online programs are designed to train individuals for a specific job such as a Web designer or graphic illustrator. Industry partnerships between course providers and companies, such as Google and AT&T, help ensure that degrees are business-ready.

Transforming learning strategies and tools requires the involvement of managers who can help foster a culture of accountability and excitement around learning and map individual learning activities with specific business and career goals. Chief learning officers need to work closely with business leaders to understand skill gaps and curate content for the company. In the near future, we will all learn while applying that new skill to our work – maybe even through the guidance of a wearable.

Learn more about how digital technology is disrupting the way we learn in future. Read the study “Study: Employees Lack Skills for Digital Transformation.” For more relevant insights, check out the SAP Service & Support thought-leadership inquiry “A New Model for Corporate Learning.

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About Alwin Gruenwald

As a senior director within the SAP Global Services and Support Marketing team, Alwin focuses on SAP Education, digital learning, and learning in the cloud. He is a seasoned marketing professional with comprehensive international business-to-business and business-to-consumer marketing experience. Before joining SAP in 2011, Alwin held various marketing management roles at companies such as NEC and Dolby Laboratories. Alwin has a Master of Arts degree in Political Sciences from the Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany. He lives in the greater Munich area with his wife and two children.

What Gen Z’s Arrival In The Workforce Means For Recruiters

Meghan M. Biro

Generation Z’s arrival in the workforce means some changes are on the horizon for recruiters. This cohort, born roughly from the mid-90s to approximately 2010, will be entering the workforce in four Hiring Generation Z words in 3d letters on an organization chart to illustrate finding young employees for your company or businessshort years, and you can bet recruiters and employers are already paying close attention to them.

This past fall, the first group of Gen Z youth began entering university. As Boomers continue to work well past traditional retirement age, four or five years from now, we’ll have an American workplace comprised of five generations.

Marketers and researchers have been obsessed with Millennials for over a decade; they are the most studied generation in history, and at 80 million strong they are an economic force to be reckoned with. HR pros have also been focused on all things related to attracting, motivating, mentoring, and retaining Millennials and now, once Gen Z is part of the workforce, recruiters will have to shift gears and also learn to work with this new, lesser-known generation. What are the important points they’ll need to know?

Northeastern University led the way with an extensive survey on Gen Z in late 2014 that included 16- through 19-year-olds and shed some light on key traits. Here are a few points from that study that recruiters should pay special attention to:

  • In general, the Generation Z cohort tends to be comprised of self-starters who have a strong desire to be autonomous. 63% of them report that they want colleges to teach them about being an entrepreneur.
  • 42% expect to be self-employed later in life, and this percentage was higher among minorities.
  • Despite the high cost of higher education, 81% of Generation Z members surveyed believe going to college is extremely important.
  • Generation Z has a lot of anxiety around debt, not only student loan debt, and they report they are very interested in being well-educated about finances.
  • Interpersonal interaction is highly important to Gen Z; just as Millennials before them, communicating via technology, including social media, is far less valuable to them than face-to-face communication.

Of course Gen Z is still very young, and their opinions as they relate to future employment may well change. For example, reality is that only 6.6% of the American workforce is self-employed, making it likely that only a small percentage of those expecting to be self-employed will be as well. The future in that respect is uncertain, and this group has a lot of learning to do and experiences yet ahead of them. However, when it comes to recruiting them, here are some things that might be helpful.

Generation Z is constantly connected

Like Millennials, Gen Z is a cohort of digital natives; they have had technology and the many forms of communication that affords since birth. They are used to instant access to information and, like their older Gen Y counterparts, they are continually processing information. Like Millennials, they prefer to solve their own problems, and will turn to YouTube or other video platforms for tutorials and to troubleshoot before asking for help. They also place great value on the reviews of their peers.

For recruiters, that means being ready to communicate on a wide variety of platforms on a continual basis. In order to recruit the top talent, you will have to be as connected as they are. You’ll need to keep up with their preferred networks, which will likely always be changing, and you’ll need to be transparent about what you want, as this generation is just as skeptical of marketing as the previous one.

Flexible schedules will continue to grow in importance

With the growth of part-time and contract workers, Gen Z will more than likely assume the same attitude their Millennial predecessors did when it comes to career expectations; they will not expect to remain with the same company for more than a few years. Flexible schedules will be a big part of their world as they move farther away from the traditional 9-to-5 job structure as work becomes more about life and less about work, and they’ll likely take on a variety of part time roles.

This preference for flexible work schedules means that business will happen outside of traditional work hours, and recruiters’ own work hours will, therefore, have to be just as flexible as their Gen Z targets’ schedule are. Companies will also have to examine what are in many cases decades old policies on acceptable work hours and business norms as they seek to not only attract, but to hire and retain this workforce with wholly different preferences than the ones that came before them. In many instances this is already happening, but I believe we will see this continue to evolve in the coming years.

Echoing the silent generation

Unlike Millennials, Gen Z came of age during difficult economic times; older Millennials were raised in the boom years. As Alex Williams points out in his recent New York Times piece, there’s an argument to be made that Generation Z is similar in attitude to the Silent Generation, growing up in a time of recession means they are more pragmatic and skeptical than their slightly older peers.

So how will this impact their behavior and desires as job candidates? Most of them are the product of Gen X parents, and stability will likely be very important to them. They may be both hard-working and fiscally savvy.

Sparks & Honey, in their much quoted slideshare on Gen Z, puts the number of high-schooler students who felt pressured by their parents to get jobs at 55 percent. Income and earning your keep are likely to be a big motivation for GenZ. Due to the recession, they also share the experience of living in multi-generational households, which may help considerably as they navigate a workplace comprised of several generations.

We don’t have all the answers

With its youngest members not yet in double digits, Gen Z is still maturing. There is obviously still a lot that we don’t know. This generation may have the opposite experience from the Millennials before them, where the older members experienced the booming economy, with some even getting a career foothold, before the collapse in 2008. Gen Z’s younger members may get to see a resurgent economy as they make their way out of college. Those younger members are still forming their personalities and views of the world; we would be presumptuous to think we have all of the answers already.

Generational analysis is part research, but also part theory testing. What we do know is that this second generation of digital natives, with its adaption of technology and comfort with the fast-paced changing world, will leave its mark on the American workforce as it makes its way in. As a result, everything about HR will change, in a big way. I wrote a post for my Forbes column recently where I said, “To recruit in this environment is like being part wizard, part astronaut, part diplomat, part guidance counselor,” and that’s very true.

As someone who loves change, I believe there has never been a more exciting time to be immersed in both the HR and the technology space. How do you feel about what’s on the horizon as it relates to the future of work and the impending arrival of Generation Z? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

Social tools are playing an increasingly important role in the workplace, especially for younger workers. Learn more: Adopting Social Software For Workforce Collaboration [Video].

The post What Gen Z’s Arrival In The Workforce Means For Recruiters appeared first on TalentCulture.

Image: Bigstock

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How The Digital Economy Is Defining An Entire Generation

Julia Caruso

millennial businesswomen using digital technology at work“Innovation distinguishes between a leader and a follower.” – Steve Jobs

As a part of the last wave of Millennials joining the workforce, I have been inspired by Jobs’ definition of innovation. For years, Millennials like me have been told that we need to be faster, better, and smarter than our peers. With this thought in mind and the endless possibilities of the Internet, it’s easy to see that the digital economy is here, and it is defining my generation.

Lately we’ve all read articles proclaiming that “the digital economy and the economy are becoming one in the same. The lines are being blurred.” While this may be true, Millennials do not see this distinction. To us, it’s just the economy. Everything we do happens in the abstract digital economy – we shop digitally, get our news digitally, communicate digitally, and we take pictures digitally. In fact, the things that we don’t do digitally are few and far between.

Millennial disruption: How to get our attention in the digital economy

In this fast-moving, highly technical era, innovation and technology are ubiquitous, forcing companies to deliver immediate value to consumers. This principle is ingrained in us – it’s stark reality. One day, a brand is a world leader, promising incredible change. Then just a few weeks later, it disappears. Millennials view leaders of the emerging (digital) economy as scrappy, agile, and comfortable making decisions that disrupt the norm, and that may or may not pan out.

What does it take to earn the attention of Millennials? Here are three things you should consider:

1. Millennials appreciate innovations that reinvent product delivery and service to make life better and simpler.

Uber, Vimeo, ASOS, and Apple are some of the most successful disruptors in the current digital economy. Why? They took an already mature market and used technology to make valuable connections with their Millennial customers. These companies did not invent a new product – they reinvented the way business is done within the economy. They knew what their consumers wanted before they realized it.

Millennials thrive on these companies. In fact, we seek them out and expect them to create rapid, digital changes to our daily lives. We want to use the products they developed. We adapt quickly to the changes powered by their new ideas or technologies. With that being said, it’s not astonishing that Millennials feel the need to connect regularly and digitally.

2. It’s not technology that captures us – it’s the simplicity that technology enables.

Recently, McKinsey & Company revealed that “CEOs expect 15%–50% of their companies’ future earnings to come from disruptive technology.” Considering this statistic, it may come as a surprise to these executives that buzzwords – including cloud, diversity, innovation, the Internet of Things, and future of work – does not resonate with us. Sure, we were raised on these terms, but it’s such a part of our culture that we do not think about it. We expect companies to deeply embed this technology now.

What we really crave is technology-enabled simplicity in every aspect of our lives. If something is too complicated to navigate, most of us stop using the product. And why not? It does not add value if we cannot use it immediately.

Many experts claim that this is unique to Millennials, but it truly isn’t. It might just be more obvious and prevalent with us. Some might translate our never-ending desire for simplicity into laziness. Yet striving to make daily activities simpler with the use of technology has been seen throughout history. Millennials just happen to be the first generation to be completely reliant on technology, simplicity, and digitally powered “personal” connections.

3. Millennials keep an eye on where and how the next technology revolution will begin.

Within the next few years Millennials will be the largest generation in the workforce. As a result, the onslaught of coverage on the evolution of technology will most likely be phased out. While the history of technology is significant for our predecessors, this not an overly important story for Millennials because we have not seen the technology evolution ourselves. For us, the digital revolution is a fact of life.

Companies like SAP, Amazon, and Apple did not invent the wheel. Rather, they were able to create a new digital future. For a company to be successful, senior leaders must demonstrate a talent for R&D genius as well as fortune-telling. They need to develop easy-to-use, brilliantly designed products, market them effectively to the masses, and maintain their product elite. It’s not easy, but the companies that upend an entire industry are successfully balancing these tasks.

Disruption can happen anywhere and at any time. Get ready!

Across every industry, big players are threatened — not only by well-known competitors, but by small teams sitting in a garage drafting new ideas that could turn the market upside down. In reality, anyone, anywhere, at any time can cause disruption and bring an idea to life.

Take my employer SAP, for example. With the creation of SAP S/4HANA, we are disrupting the tech market as we help our customers engage in digital transformation. By removing data warehousing and enabling real-time operations, companies are reimagining their future. Organizations such as La Trobe University, the NFL, and Adidas have made it easy to understand and conceptualize the effects using data in real time. But only time will tell whether Millennials will ever realize how much disruption was needed to get where we are today.

Find out how SAP Services & Support you can minimize the impact of disruption and maximize the success of your business. Read SAP S/4HANA customer success stories, visit the SAP Services HUB, or visit the customer testimonial page on SAP.com.

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About Julia Caruso

Julia Caruso is a Global Audience Marketing Specialist at SAP. She is responsible for developing strategic digital media plans and working with senior executives to create high level content for SAP S/4HANA and SAP Activate.

How Much Will Digital Cannibalization Eat into Your Business?

Fawn Fitter

Former Cisco CEO John Chambers predicts that 40% of companies will crumble when they fail to complete a successful digital transformation.

These legacy companies may be trying to keep up with insurgent companies that are introducing disruptive technologies, but they’re being held back by the ease of doing business the way they always have – or by how vehemently their customers object to change.

Most organizations today know that they have to embrace innovation. The question is whether they can put a digital business model in place without damaging their existing business so badly that they don’t survive the transition. We gathered a panel of experts to discuss the fine line between disruption and destruction.

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qa_qIn 2011, when Netflix hiked prices and tried to split its streaming and DVD-bymail services, it lost 3.25% of its customer base and 75% of its market capitalization.²︐³ What can we learn from that?

Scott Anthony: That debacle shows that sometimes you can get ahead of your customers. The key is to manage things at the pace of the market, not at your internal speed. You need to know what your customers are looking for and what they’re willing to tolerate. Sometimes companies forget what their customers want and care about, and they try to push things on them before they’re ready.

R. “Ray” Wang: You need to be able to split your traditional business and your growth business so that you can focus on big shifts instead of moving the needle 2%. Netflix was responding to its customers – by deciding not to define its brand too narrowly.

qa_qDoes disruption always involve cannibalizing your own business?

Wang: You can’t design new experiences in existing systems. But you have to make sure you manage the revenue stream on the way down in the old business model while managing the growth of the new one.

Merijn Helle: Traditional brick-and-mortar stores are putting a lot of capital into digital initiatives that aren’t paying enough back yet in the form of online sales, and they’re cannibalizing their profits so they can deliver a single authentic experience. Customers don’t see channels, they see brands; and they want to interact with brands seamlessly in real time, regardless of channel or format.

Lars Bastian: In manufacturing, new technologies aren’t about disrupting your business model as much as they are about expanding it. Think about predictive maintenance, the ability to warn customers when the product they’ve purchased will need service. You’re not going to lose customers by introducing new processes. You have to add these digitized services to remain competitive.

qa_qIs cannibalizing your own business better or worse than losing market share to a more innovative competitor?

Michael Liebhold: You have to create that digital business and mandate it to grow. If you cannibalize the existing business, that’s just the price you have to pay.

Wang: Companies that cannibalize their own businesses are the ones that survive. If you don’t do it, someone else will. What we’re really talking about is “Why do you exist? Why does anyone want to buy from you?”

Anthony: I’m not sure that’s the right question. The fundamental question is what you’re using disruption to do. How do you use it to strengthen what you’re doing today, and what new things does it enable? I think you can get so consumed with all the changes that reconfigure what you’re doing today that you do only that. And if you do only that, your business becomes smaller, less significant, and less interesting.

qa_qSo how should companies think about smart disruption?

Anthony: Leaders have to reconfigure today and imagine tomorrow at the same time. It’s not either/or. Every disruptive threat has an equal, if not greater, opportunity. When disruption strikes, it’s a mistake only to feel the threat to your legacy business. It’s an opportunity to expand into a different marke.

SAP_Disruption_QA_images2400x1600_4Liebhold: It starts at the top. You can’t ask a CEO for an eight-figure budget to upgrade a cloud analytics system if the C-suite doesn’t understand the power of integrating data from across all the legacy systems. So the first task is to educate the senior team so it can approve the budgets.

Scott Underwood: Some of the most interesting questions are internal organizational questions, keeping people from feeling that their livelihoods are in danger or introducing ways to keep them engaged.

Leon Segal: Absolutely. If you want to enter a new market or introduce a new product, there’s a whole chain of stakeholders – including your own employees and the distribution chain. Their experiences are also new. Once you start looking for things that affect their experience, you can’t help doing it. You walk around the office and say, “That doesn’t look right, they don’t look happy. Maybe we should change that around.”

Fawn Fitter is a freelance writer specializing in business and technology. 

To learn more about how to disrupt your business without destroying it, read the in-depth report Digital Disruption: When to Cook the Golden Goose.

Download the PDF (1.2MB)

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How Disruption Will Cause The Insurance Industry To Change

Joe Pacor

Digital transformation is changing our world, and the insurance industry cannot sit idly and avoid these changes. It’s expected that the digital customer experience will drastically drive insurance profitability in the years to come. Over 50% of insured clients won’t recommend an insurer that doesn’t have digital interaction options. An overwhelming 61% of customers prefer to track their claim status digitally instead of contacting the insurance company or agency through more traditional means. It’s estimated that 79% of insurance executives recognize the need for innovation, but are having problems with daily operations. Over 60% see both opportunities and threats in the digital transformation process. At the same time, 74% of insurance executives feel they don’t have the necessary skills to drive the needed changes.

How does your company adapt to such a changing landscape? One common way approach is updating existing business models. Many companies have already been successful in driving digital transformation through a wide range of channels. Online-only insurance solutions and faster approval times are emerging in some companies. Others are turning to e-aggregator platforms to  keep their business afloat while changing company practices and assets to the digital economy.

Here are a few examples of promising companies and how they’re innovating to meet disruption.

Esurance

Esurance started in 1999 as an online-only business. With over five million customers, it has seen rapid growth since its beginnings. And because the insurer started out with a direct insurance digital approach, it is ahead of the game in terms of digital transformation since many competitors are still struggling to move away from their agency-based model.

Though it’s not available nationwide, it has become available in 43 states, which is still significant growth for a company that is not yet 20 years old. Esurance offers much lower rates, due to its direct insurance approach that cuts out many middleman expenses. As one of the first direct insurance companies, it is still catching up to competitors for customer service, but may very well be an example of future insurance company operations.

Haven Life

When it comes to fast approval, Haven Life has Big Data science down perfectly. This MassMutual spin-off claims it can approve most customers for new term life insurance in about 20 minutes. The company bases its decision on motor vehicle records from the state, prescription drug information, a customer questionnaire, and other data available to the company. The quick decision process will make the company much more popular among individuals seeking insurance policies under $1 million. As the system is based entirely online, it reduces agency costs significantly.

Moneysupermarket

In the UK, a newer e-aggregator platform helps customers compare prices and purchase insurance online. Moneysupermarket provides fast access to other online services as well. It was launched in 1999 as a digital-only solution that compares mortgage rates. In 2003, the insurance portion of the platform began with a mission to save at approximately 10 million households at least £200 through competitive shopping.

The company streamlines the process by having the prospect fill out a single form. That information is then used to pull quotes from multiple insurance companies. The prospects can compare the different policies to see which one is the best fit for their situation. They can then either select and purchase at that time or come back at a later time to finish the process. The company benefits by seeing additional sales at a much reduced cost compared to traditional marketing channels.

The role Big Data plays

Insurance businesses are also forming new business networks to provide a more tailored product to clients. As an example, State Farm and ADT provide a paired offering that protects connected homes through a single service. This helps customers reduce the number of businesses they must work with. At the same time, both companies benefit with increased business as customers turn to the network for simplicity.

Meanwhile, the Internet of Things is creating a new level of hyperconnectivity and data harvesting behind the scenes. Insurance rates currently based on a doctor’s visit will instead draw information from wearable devices, workout records, and pharmacy records. Rate reductions for self-driving cars will be based on the percentage of time the car is driven by a human versus driven autonomously.

With all these changes disrupting the industry, remaining flexible and connected makes all the difference. Is your company ready to meet the changes digital transformation is causing? If you aren’t, it is time to look at options to become more agile.

Learn more about how we can help you meet the challenges of disruption head on today. Please download our Insurance White Paper “How Insurers Can Prepare for the Digital Revolution” today to see what SAP has to offer. We will work with you to develop an insurance business that’s ready to meet the needs of the digital world.

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About Joe Pacor

Joe Pacor is senior director, Industry Cloud Marketing-Insurance at SAP, responsible for driving the growth of SAP's value proposition as a technology provider, trusted business partner, and thought leader for the insurance industry.