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Companies Get Fit To Fight Global Obesity

John Ward

The statistics around obesity are shocking: According to recent estimates from the World Health Organization (WHO), more than 1.9 billion adults worldwide are overweight. Of these, more than 600 million are obese.
Even more distressing is the fact that 42 million children under the age of 5 are considered overweight or obese.

The negative health consequences of excess weight are well-known. A high body mass index (BMI) – which is the weight-to-height measurement commonly used to identify obesity – is a major risk factor in cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, musculoskeletal disorders, and some cancers.

And new research now suggests a link between obesity and dementia.

The problem is global. WHO states that most of the world’s population live in countries where being overweight and obese kills more people than being underweight.

With the stakes this high, world governments and the private sector are seeking effective ways to confront the epidemic.

Latin America: a case in point

Latin America might be ground zero in this global struggle.

As reported by Reuters, more than 56% of Latin American adults are overweight or obese – compared to a global average of 34%. Many experts point to the region’s changing dietary habits since the 1980s – like an explosive increase in processed foods – as a key contributing factor.

Increasingly, the battle against obesity in Latin America and elsewhere is being fought with a broader arsenal of weapons that includes diet, exercise, weight-loss programs, surgical procedures, new pharmaceuticals, and even legislative action.

The Mexican government, for example, has levied an excise tax on certain food products as a way to cut down on the country’s growing obesity problem. The country’s congress passed a one-peso-per-liter tax on sugary beverages and an 8% percent sales tax on junk foods that include chips, cookies, candy, and ice cream.

Pharmaceutical companies join the fight

The private sector is also looking to make a difference.

Productos Medix S.A. de C.V. is a good example. Based in Mexico City, Medix is a leading pharmaceutical manufacturer that specializes in comprehensive healthcare solutions. In addition to developing pharmaceuticals for obesity and metabolic disorders, Medix also works with strategic partners to market portion-controlled meal replacement products.

Although Medix has been around for more than 50 years, it is not surprising that the company has expanded significantly in recent years. It now has a presence throughout Central America and in countries such as Argentina and Columbia.

Medix is investing heavily in its Center for Pharmaceutical Research and Development (CIDEFARMA). CIDEFARMA’s primary function is to unify the company’s various technological projects. Here, Medix is investigating new obesity treatments that it hopes will offer lower, more effective doses and reduced side effects.

The company has also undergone a major transformation on its business side. For example, Medix recently implemented a cloud-based human resource solution to help develop the talent that will be needed in its continuing fight against obesity. And with assistance from OptiSoft S.A. de C.V. and Bayco Consulting S.C., the pharmaceutical manufacturer has consolidated 60 different software systems on a single business platform.

This integration will help Medix ensure the quality standards and regulatory compliance that are critical to pharmaceutical companies as they seek next-generation drug therapies.

Fighting obesity on many fronts

Obesity is not a problem restricted to a single region of the world or to any one demographic. Again according to WHO, obesity has more than doubled worldwide since 1980.

Unfortunately, there does not appear to be a single answer to this problem. But with all the health consequences associated with being overweight, obesity is probably a challenge best met on many fronts.

It is always worth saying that controlling obesity starts with the basics of diet and exercise. And of course, be sure to consult your physician before starting any weight loss regime.

Building a successful company is hard work. SAP’s affordable solutions for small and midsize companies are designed to make it easier. SAP SME Solutions help you automate and integrate your business processes to give real-time actionable insights. So you can make decisions on the spot. Find out how Run Simple can work for you. Visit sap.com/sme.

Follow me on Twitter at @JohnGWard3.

You might also like this SAP Business Transformation Study about Productos Medix.

This story originally appeared on SAP Business Trends.
Top image via Shutterstock

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About John Ward

John Ward is an Integrated Marketing Expert at SAP. He has over 30 years of professional writing experience that includes marketing material, sales support, technical documentation, video scripting, and magazine articles.

Innovation Without Boundaries: Why The Cloud Matters

Michael Haws

Is it possible to innovate without boundaries?

Of course – if you are using the cloud. An actual cloud doesn’t have any boundaries. It’s fluid. But more important, it can provide the much-needed precipitation that brings nature to life. So it is with cloud technology – but it’s your ideas that can grow and transform your business.USA --- Clouds, Heaven --- Image by © Ocean/Corbis

Running your business in the cloud is no longer just a consideration during a typical use-case exercise. Business executives are now faced with making decisions on solutions that go beyond previous limitations with cloud computing. Selecting the latest tools to address a business process gap is now less about features and more about functionality.

It doesn’t matter whether your organization is experienced with cloud solutions or new to the concept. Cloud technology is quickly becoming a core part of addressing the needs of a growing business.

5 considerations when planning your journey to the cloud

How can your organization define its successful path to the cloud? Here are five things you should consider when investigating whether a move to the cloud is right for you.

1. Understanding the cloud is great, but putting it into action is another thing.

For most CIOs, putting a cloud strategy on paper is new territory. Cloud computing is taking on new realms: Pure managed services to software-as-a-service (SaaS). Just as legacy computing had different flavors, so does cloud technology.

2. There is more than one way to innovate in the cloud.

Alignment with an open cloud reference architecture can help your CIO deliver on the promises of the cloud while using a stair-step approach to cloud adoption – from on-premise to hybrid to full cloud computing. Some companies find their own path by constantly reevaluating their needs and shifting their focus when necessary – making the move from running a data center to delivering real value to stakeholders, for example.

3. The cloud can help accelerate processes and lower cost.

By recognizing unprecedented growth, your organization can embark on a path to significant transformation that powers greater agility and competitiveness. Choose a solution set that best meets your needs, and implement and support it moving forward. By leveraging the cloud to support the chosen solution, ongoing maintenance, training, and system issues becomes the cloud provider’s responsibility. And for you, this offers the freedom to focus on the core business.

4. You can lock down your infrastructure and ensure more efficient processes.

Do you use a traditional reporting engine against a large relational database to generate a sequential batched report to close your books at quarter’s end? If so, you’re not alone. Sure, a new solution with new technology may be an obvious improvement. But how valuable to your board will you become when you reduce the financial closing process by 1–3 days? That’s the beauty of the cloud: You can accelerate the deployment of your chosen solution and realize ROI quickly – even before the next full reporting period.

5. The cloud opens the door to new opportunity in a secure environment.

For many companies, moving to the cloud may seem impossible due to the time and effort needed to train workers and hire resources with the right skill sets. Plus, if you are a startup in a rural location, it may not be as easy to attract the right talent as it is for your Silicon Valley counterparts. The cloud allows your business to secure your infrastructure as well as recruit and onboard those hard-to-find resources by applying a managed services contract to run your cloud model

The cloud means many things to different people. What’s your path?

With SAP HANA Enterprise Cloud service, you can navigate the best path to building, running, and operating your own cloud when running critical business processes. Find out how SAP HANA Enterprise Cloud can deliver the speed and resources necessary to quickly validate and realize solid ROI.

Check out the video below or visit us at www.sap.com/services-support/svc/in-memory-computing/hana-consulting/enterprise-cloud-services/index.html.

Connect with us on Twitter: @SAPServices

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Michael Haws

About Michael Haws

Michael Haws is the Vice President of HANA Enterprise Cloud at SAP. His specialties include Enterprise Resource Planning Software & Services, Onshore, Nearshore, Offshore--Application, Infrastructure and Business Process Outsourcing.

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Consumers And Providers: Two Halves Of The Hybrid Cloud Equation

Marty McCormick

Long gone are the days of CIOs and IT managers freely spending money to move their 02 Jun 2012 --- Young creatives having lunch and conversation. --- Image by © Hero/Corbisexisting systems to the cloud without any real business justification just to be part of the latest hype. As cloud deployments are becoming more prevalent, IT leaders are now tasked with proving the tangible benefits of adopting a cloud strategy from an operational, efficiency, and cost perspective. At the same time, they must balance their end users’ increasing demand for access to more data from an ever-expanding list of public cloud sources.

Lately, public cloud systems have become part of IT landscapes both in the form of multi-tenant systems, such as software-as-a-service (SaaS) offerings and data consumption applications such as Twitter. Along with the integration of applications and data outside of the corporate domain, new architectures have been spawned, requiring real-time and seamless integration points.  As shown in the figure below, these hybrid clouds – loosely defined as the integration of data from systems in both public and private clouds in a unified fashion – are the foundation of this new IT architecture.

hybridCloudImage

Not only has the hybrid cloud changed a company’s approach to deploying new software, but it has also changed the way software is developed and sold from a provider’s perspective.

The provider perspective: Unifying development and operations

Thanks to the hybrid cloud approach, system administrators and developers are sitting side by side in an agile development model known as Development and Operations (DevOps). By increasing collaboration, communication, innovation, and problem resolution, development teams can closely collaborate with system administrators and provide a continuous feedback loop of both sides of the agile methodology.

For example, operations teams can provide feedback on reported software bugs, software support issues, and new feature requests to development teams in real time. Likewise, development teams develop and test new applications with support and maintainability as a key pillar in design.
After seeing the advantages realized by cloud providers that have embraced this approach long ago, other companies that have traditionally separated these two areas are now adopting the DevOps model.

The consumer perspective: Moving to the cloud on its own terms

From the standpoint of the corporate consumer, hybrid cloud deployments bring a number of advantages to an IT organization. Specifically, the hybrid approach allows companies to move some application functionality to the cloud at their own pace.
Many applications naturally lend themselves to public cloud domains given their application and data requirements. For most companies, HR, indirect procurement, travel, and CRM systems are the first to be deployed in a public cloud. This approach eliminates the requirement for building and operating these applications in house while allowing IT areas to take advantage of new features and technologies much faster.

However, there is one challenge consumers need to overcome: The lack of capabilities needed to extend these applications and meet business requirements when the standard offering is often insufficient. Unfortunately, this tempts organizations to create extensive custom applications that replicate information across a variety of systems to meet end user requirements. This development work can offset the cost benefits of the initial cloud application, especially when you consider the upgrades and support required to maintain the application.

What this all means to everyone involved in the hybrid cloud

Given these two perspectives, on-premise software providers are transforming themselves so they can meet the ever-evolving demands of today’s information consumer. In particular, they are preparing for these unique challenges facing customers and creating a smooth journey to a hybrid cloud.

Take SAP, for example. By adopting a DevOps model to break down a huge internal barrier and allowing tighter collaboration, the company has delivered a simpler approach to hybrid cloud deployments through the SAP HANA Cloud Platform for extending applications and SAP HANA Enterprise Cloud for hosting solutions.

Find out how these two innovations can help you implement a robust and secure hybrid cloud solution:
SAP HANA Cloud Platform
SAP HANA Enterprise Cloud

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Marty McCormick

About Marty McCormick

Marty McCormick is the Lead Technical Architect, Managed Cloud Delivery, at SAP. He is experienced in a wide range of SAP solutions, including SAP Netweaver SAP Portal, SAP CRM, SAP SRM, SAP MDM, SAP BI, and SAP ERP.

Robots: Job Destroyers or Human Partners? [INFOGRAPHIC]

Christopher Koch

Robots: Job Destroyers or Human Partners? [INFOGRAPHIC]

To learn more about how humans and robots will co-evolve, read the in-depth report Bring Your Robot to Work.

Download the PDF (91KB)

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About Christopher Koch

Christopher Koch is the Editorial Director of the SAP Center for Business Insight. He is an experienced publishing professional, researcher, editor, and writer in business, technology, and B2B marketing. Share your thoughts with Chris on Twitter @Ckochster.

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Building A Business Case For Financial Transformation

Nilly Essaides

There’s constant pressure on the CFO from the CEO to do better—to innovate, and to transform the finance organization into both a leaner and a more forward-looking analytics hub that provides insight and foresight to the enterprise. CFOs today must:

  • Interpret numbers instead of reporting them
  • Deploy enabling technology to automate low-value work
  • Scout for business and growth opportunities
  • Work effectively with Big Data to turn their teams into the brains of the organization
  • Act as true partners to the CEO, business leaders, and board of directors

Defining the ROI for transformation

Transformation sounds great in theory, but to get finance to literally go beyond its form—not an easy feat—executives need to see a strong business case and a tangible payback. After all, finance is all about the ROI.

Here are some solutions CFOs can wrap their heads around to help drive change:

  • Manage competitive disruption. Today’s business environment is rife with competitive threats. My last post listed five ways financial planning and analysis (FP&A) in its future form can help companies battle these threats. The cost of not transforming the finance function into the fast-thinking, forward-looking brains of the enterprise is the opportunity cost of falling behind. It’s the risk of becoming irrelevant through the inability to foresee competitive threats, or of lacking an action plan for dealing with the potential impact of such pressures on the financial health of the corporation.
  • Streamline processes. Obviously, there’s the dollars-and-cents savings that come from streamlining processes, using new technologies, and breaking down internal silos. For example, in many organizations, forecasting processes occur in different departments. Merging these disparate processes into one and using a single technology platform can save enormous resources in terms of systems and time. It eliminates duplicate entries of data and the need to reconcile discordant information, or the need to later argue about which number is right. It creates a single version of the truth.

Even within finance, things can be improved. Often the processes of budgeting, forecasting, and planning happen in isolation in different time frames. And operational and financial planning occur in different cycles and levels. By syncing up these processes, companies can get rid of redundancies. What’s more important, they can discover efficiencies and improve the quality of the end product.

  • Eliminate waste and free up strategic time. New technologies are enabling the finance function to automate low-value work and free up executives’ time to focus on strategic thinking, developing partnerships with the business, and advising management on how to drive growth. The payback is smarter decisions (faster growth, higher investment returns) while lowering operating expenses.
  • Look forward. Finance and FP&A today are shifting their focus from yesterday to tomorrow, from what happened to what’s going to happen. Transforming their mindset is key to helping the business move forward. Using techniques and technologies like driver-based modeling and predictive analytics, finance is remaking itself and producing faster, more frequent and—most importantly—more accurate forecasts. It’s giving management the one thing that matters most: time to pull business levers to affect future financial results. The payback is higher sales, wider margins, and lower cost of operations.
  • Change the mindset. There’s no transformation of the financial organization without a transformation of the financial skill set of executives. The first-quarter Deloitte CFO Signal Survey indicated that CFOs expect to embark on a wide range of efforts to improve the performance of their teams before the end of 2016. While foundational finance skills remain a must, to transform finance into the “A-team” of the future, executives must possess business acumen, diplomacy skills, intellectual curiosity, technology savvy, and a degree of comfort with ambivalence. They have to be okay with making decisions without 100% of the information. One can argue that the return on soft skills is soft. But it also means being able to move fast and grab windows of opportunity. Not all business cases are based on cost savings.
  • Build an analytics hub. The biggest challenge for CFOs today is to transform finance into the analytical hub of the organization and leverage Big Data to drive smarter business decisions—both in terms of cost cutting and in giving the business units advice on how to market, sell, develop, and grow their operations. That’s how finance fits within the digital enterprise. Finance needs to funnel Big Data from all corners of the organization—and outside it—to leverage its unique central viewpoint. It must bring the information together and run it through advanced analytics models to come up with causal relationships that explain what business initiatives are really moving the needle, what steps the company can take to improve results, and what its customers are doing and are likely to do. Digitizing finance has a huge payback: It allows companies to stay competitive in a digital economy.

Is finance transformation worth the effort? That may be the wrong question. The question is, can companies afford not to transform their finance function and remain relevant now and going forward?

Learn how the FP&A team at CF Industries Holdings Inc. prioritized business partnering options and transformed the organization to optimally support strategic goals by establishing an integrated business planning process at the AFP Annual Conference session, Driving Finance Transformation Through Integrated Business Planning.

For more of my insights on FP&A, subscribe to the monthly FP&A e-newsletter from my company, the Association for Financial Professionals. You can also connect with me on LinkedIn or follow me on Twitter.

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Nilly Essaides

About Nilly Essaides

Nilly Essaides is the director of the FP&A Practice at the Association for Financial Professionals. She has over 25 years of experience in the finance field. Nilly has written multiple in-depth research reports on FP&A and Treasury topics, as well as countless articles. She also speaks at conferences and moderates financial executives' roundtables across the country. Nilly has published a book on best-practice transfer and process excellence with the APQC, "If We Only Knew What We Know."