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Empathy, Design Thinking, And An Obsession With Customer-Centric Innovation

Kaan Turnali

SAPVoice-Empathy-An-Obsession-With-Customer-Centric-Innovation-by-Kaan-TurnaliTo deliver innovative, customer-centric solutions through design thinking, we must begin with empathy.

In its simplest and purest form, empathy enables us to not only experience and understand another person’s circumstances, but it also puts us in our customers’ shoes to experience what they are feeling. This is where we find the innate struggle born out of user frustrations and bound to the intrinsic value chain of the user experience.

Without a doubt, empathy is the most important design thinking principle I will cover in this series. Its universal application offers infinite promise.

Customer-centric design is about looking out from the inside — rather than outside in

Design thinking helps us cut through the opacity that surrounds our customers’ (or users’) needs and behaviors, their connections with existing ecosystems, and their interactions with one another. In essence, empathy becomes a compass that guides us along the innovation path as we set out to discover hidden, but detectable, elements of the user experience.

We embrace the empathy principle by living and experiencing our users’ pain points and state of mind strictly from their perspective. This is why customer-centric design should be a practice of looking out from the inside—and not as outsiders looking in. It requires us to open our nerve endings, so to speak, and increase our awareness in a state of design mindfulness.

We can’t do that from behind a desk, inside the margins of an interview, or on the pages of a requirements document. We need to be right in the trenches, working, observing, and, more importantly, suffering side by side with them within their authentic circles and under realistic conditions. Only then do we have a chance to live the experience—rather than experience it in a distant light.

The more we know, the more biased we become

The more we know about something; the more prone we become to intuitive bias. This mindset can turn our expertise and experience into perceived knowledge and resurface them in a form that can be both restrictive in its forward-thinking motion and narrow in its depth and angle.

To be clear, this viewpoint neither rejects nor diminishes the knowledge and experience we bring to the table. Subject-matter expertise is not only a critical multiplier of design thinking, but it is also essential to collective insight. (More on this topic later in the series).

What we are advocating here is the strength that lies in the application of the empathy principle: The desire to seek realization and perceptiveness in the experience—not accumulated experience confined to raw knowledge.

Validating design in the absence of rigid knowledge is how we gain true insight and uncover design blind spots. We want to focus on the problem and defer any preconceived notions about the solution. Think of it as a reset button. If applied correctly, we experience the world around us in the proper light. We lead ourselves (and others who join us in this journey) into a state of alertness that cuts thru bias—conscious or unconscious—that could otherwise impact our ability to be receptive toward creative solutions and possibilities.

Focus on users’ experiences — especially the emotional ones

Don’t underestimate or skip emotional boundaries around which a product, service, or process is designed and built. These edges may be rough and sometimes come with baggage. That is precisely where we find the greatest opportunity.

Humans react to emotional probes—solicited or not—that are often accompanied by emotional assurances rather than logic, reason, or dispassion. I call these “emosurances.” They include things such as: “We don’t want to be left in the dark.” “Updates and continuous information flow are good.” “We want to know the next steps.” “We hate uncertainty.”

Regardless of their shape, form, or frequency, we seek these cues to assure ourselves. They play a critical role in shaping the user experience. Emosurances are the points of light in design thinking that we seek to uncover, which are commonly hidden or marginal.

Empathy is the shortest distance between design thinking and customer-centric innovation.

When we place the customer (user) at the core of everything we do in our design-thinking journey, we foster a human-centered approach that always focuses on needs, including those that are unarticulated or unknown. If we can bring empathy to the forefront and make it a focal point of our thinking, we expand our capacity to experience and understand before judging or executing. That’s the essence of customer empathy.

This approach creates an incredible opportunity to deepen our frame of design thinking—a prerequisite for thinking in the design. And empathy lies within the depths of our passion and tenacity that yields itself to an obsession with customer-centric innovation.

For more on why a customer-centric approach is key for your business, see Do You Hear The Voice Of Your Customer?

Connect with me on Twitter (@KaanTurnali), LinkedIn and turnali.com

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About Kaan Turnali

Kaan Turnali is the Global Senior Director, Enterprise Analytics, at SAP. He is responsible for the development, oversight, and execution of strategy for the BI platform across GCO’s worldwide user base of 25,000+ registered users.

Amazing Digital Marketing Trends And Tips To Expand Your Business In 2015

Sunny Popali

Amazing Digital Marketing Trends & Tips To Expand Your Business In 2015The fast-paced world of digital marketing is changing too quickly for most companies to adapt. But staying up to date with the latest industry trends is imperative for anyone involved with expanding a business.

Here are five trends that have shaped the industry this year and that will become more important as we move forward:

  1. Email marketing will need to become smarter

Whether you like it or not, email is the most ubiquitous tool online. Everyone has it, and utilizing it properly can push your marketing ahead of your rivals. Because business use of email is still very widespread, you need to get smarter about email marketing in order to fully realize your business’s marketing strategy. Luckily, there are a number of tools that can help you market more effectively, such as Mailchimp.

  1. Content marketing will become integrated and more valuable

Content is king, and it seems to be getting more important every day. Google and other search engines are focusing more on the content you create as the potential of the online world as marketing tool becomes apparent. Now there seems to be a push for current, relevant content that you can use for your services and promote your business.

Staying fresh with the content you provide is almost as important as ensuring high-quality content. Customers will pay more attention if your content is relevant and timely.

  1. Mobile assets and paid social media are more important than ever

It’s no secret that mobile is key to your marketing efforts. More mobile devices are sold and more people are reading content on mobile screens than ever before, so it is crucial to your overall strategy to have mobile marketing expertise on your team. London-based Abacus Marketing agrees that mobile marketing could overtake desktop website marketing in just a few years.

  1. Big Data for personalization plays a key role

Marketers are increasingly using Big Data to get their brand message out to the public in a more personalized format. One obvious example is Google Trend analysis, a highly useful tool that marketing experts use to obtain the latest on what is trending around the world. You can — and should — use it in your business marketing efforts. Big Data will also let you offer specific content to buyers who are more likely to look for certain items, for example, and offer personalized deals to specific groups of within your customer base. Other tools, which until recently were the stuff of science fiction, are also available that let you do things like use predictive analysis to score leads.

  1. Visual media matters

A picture really is worth a thousand words, as the saying goes, and nobody can deny the effectiveness of a well-designed infographic. In fact, some studies suggest that Millennials are particularly attracted to content with great visuals. Animated gifs and colorful bar graphs have even found their way into heavy-duty financial reports, so why not give them a try in your business marketing efforts?

A few more tips:

  • Always keep your content relevant and current to attract the attention of your target audience.
  • Always keep all your social media and public accounts fresh. Don’t use old content or outdated pictures in any public forum.
  • Your reviews are a proxy for your online reputation, so pay careful attention to them.
  • Much online content is being consumed on mobile now, so focus specifically on the design and usability of your mobile apps.
  • Online marketing is essentially geared towards getting more traffic onto your site. The more people visit, the better your chances of increasing sales.

Want more insight on how digital marketing is evolving? See Shutterstock Report: The Face Of Marketing Is Changing — And It Doesn’t Include Vince Vaughn.

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About Sunny Popali

Sunny Popali is SEO Director at www.tempocreative.com. Tempo Creative is a Phoenix inbound marketing company that has served over 700 clients since 2001. Tempos team specializes in digital and internet marketing services including web design, SEO, social media and strategy.

Compelling Shopping Moments: 4 Creative Ways Stores Connect With Their Customers

Ralf Kern

compelling shopping momentsOn a recent morning, as I was going through my usual routine, my coffeemaker broke. I cannot live without coffee in the morning, so I immediately looked up my coffeemaker on Amazon and had it shipped Prime in one day. My problem was solved within minutes. My Amazon app, and my loyalty account with that company, was there for me when I needed it most.

It was in this moment that I realized the importance of digital presence for retailers. There is a chance that the store 10 minutes from my house carries this very same coffeemaker; I could have had it in one hour, instead of one day. But the need for immediate access to information pushed me to the online store. My local retailer was not able to be there for me digitally like Amazon.

Retail is still about reading the minds of your customers in order to know what they need and create a flawless experience. But the days of the unconnected shopper in a monochannel world are over. I am not alone in my digital-first mindset; according to a recent MasterCard report, 80% of consumers use technology during the shopping process. I, and consumers like me, use mobile devices as a guide to the physical world.

We don’t need to have an academic discussion about multichannel, omnichannel, and omnicommerce and their meanings, because what it really comes down to for your consumers, or fans, is shopping. And shopping has everything to do with moments in your customers’ lives: celebration moments, in-a-hurry moments, I-want-to-be-entertained moments, and more. Most companies only look for and measure very few moments along the shopping journey, like the moment of coupon download or the moment of sales.

Anticipating these moments was easier when mom and pop stores knew their customers by name. They knew how to be there for their shoppers when, where, and how they wanted it. And shoppers didn’t have any other options. Now it is crucial for companies to understand all of these moments and even anticipate or trigger the right moments for their customers.

In today’s digital economy the way to achieve customer connection is with simple, enjoyable, and personalized front ends that are supported by sophisticated, digital back ends. Then you can use that system to support your customer outreach.

Companies around the world are using creative and innovative methods to find their customers in various moments. Being there for customers comes in many different shapes and forms. Consider these examples:

Chilli Beans

A Brazilian maker of fashion sunglasses, glasses, and watches, Chilli Beans has a loyal following online and at over 700 locations around the world. Chilli Beans keeps its customers engaged by releasing 10 limited-edition styles each week. If customers like what they see, they have to buy fast or risk missing out.

Bonobos

Online men’s fashion retailer Bonobos reaches its customers with its Guide Shops. While they look like traditional retail outlets, the shops don’t actually sell any clothes. Customers come in for one-on-one appointments with the staff, and if they like anything that they try on, the staff member orders it for them online and it is shipped to their house. The 20 Guide Shops currently open have proven very successful for the company.

Peak Performance

Peak Performance, a European maker of outdoor clothing, has added a little magic to its customer experience. It has created virtual pop-up shops that customers can track on their smartphones through CatchMagicHour.com, and they are only available at sunrise and sunset at exact GPS locations. Customers who go to the location, be it at a lighthouse or on top of a mountain, are rewarded with the ability to select free clothing from the virtual shop that they have unlocked on their phones.

Shoes of Prey

The customer experience is completely custom at Shoes of Prey, a website where women can design custom shoes. From fabric to color, the customer picks every element, and then her custom creation is sent directly to her house. Shoes of Prey has even shifted its business model based on customer feedback. Its customers wanted to get inspiration and advice in a physical store. So Shoes of Prey made the move from online-only to omnicommerce and has started to open stores around the world.

While the customer experience for each of these connections is relatively simple – a website, a smartphone, an online design studio – the back end that powers them has to be powerful and nimble at the same time. These sophisticated back ends – powering simple, enjoyable, and personalized front ends – will completely change the game in retail. They will allow companies to engage their customers in ways we can’t even begin to imagine.

Technology will help you be there in the shopping moment. The best technology won’t annoy your customers with irrelevant promotions or pop-up messages. Instead, like a good friend, it will know how to engage with customers and when to leave them alone – how to truly connect with customers instead of manage them. Consequently, customer relationship management as we know it is an outdated technology in the economy of today – and tomorrow. Technologies that go beyond CRM will help retailers to differentiate. Aligning your organization and those technologies will be the Holy Grail to creating true and sustainable customer loyalty.

Learn more ways that business will never be the same again. Learn 99 Mind-Blowing Ways The Digital Economy Is Changing The Future Of Business.

Find out how SAP can help you go beyond CRM and support your retail business.

Ralf Kern is Global Vice President Retail for SAP and a retail ambassador for SAP. Interested in your feedback. You can also get in touch on Twitter or LinkedIn

This blog also appeared on SAP Customer Network.

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Ralf Kern

About Ralf Kern

Ralf Kern is the Global Vice President, Business Unit Retail, at SAP, responsible for the future direction of SAP’s solution and global Go-to-Market strategy for Omnicommerce Retail, leading them into today’s digital reality.

How Much Will Digital Cannibalization Eat into Your Business?

Fawn Fitter

Former Cisco CEO John Chambers predicts that 40% of companies will crumble when they fail to complete a successful digital transformation.

These legacy companies may be trying to keep up with insurgent companies that are introducing disruptive technologies, but they’re being held back by the ease of doing business the way they always have – or by how vehemently their customers object to change.

Most organizations today know that they have to embrace innovation. The question is whether they can put a digital business model in place without damaging their existing business so badly that they don’t survive the transition. We gathered a panel of experts to discuss the fine line between disruption and destruction.

SAP_Disruption_QA_images2400x1600_3

qa_qIn 2011, when Netflix hiked prices and tried to split its streaming and DVD-bymail services, it lost 3.25% of its customer base and 75% of its market capitalization.²︐³ What can we learn from that?

Scott Anthony: That debacle shows that sometimes you can get ahead of your customers. The key is to manage things at the pace of the market, not at your internal speed. You need to know what your customers are looking for and what they’re willing to tolerate. Sometimes companies forget what their customers want and care about, and they try to push things on them before they’re ready.

R. “Ray” Wang: You need to be able to split your traditional business and your growth business so that you can focus on big shifts instead of moving the needle 2%. Netflix was responding to its customers – by deciding not to define its brand too narrowly.

qa_qDoes disruption always involve cannibalizing your own business?

Wang: You can’t design new experiences in existing systems. But you have to make sure you manage the revenue stream on the way down in the old business model while managing the growth of the new one.

Merijn Helle: Traditional brick-and-mortar stores are putting a lot of capital into digital initiatives that aren’t paying enough back yet in the form of online sales, and they’re cannibalizing their profits so they can deliver a single authentic experience. Customers don’t see channels, they see brands; and they want to interact with brands seamlessly in real time, regardless of channel or format.

Lars Bastian: In manufacturing, new technologies aren’t about disrupting your business model as much as they are about expanding it. Think about predictive maintenance, the ability to warn customers when the product they’ve purchased will need service. You’re not going to lose customers by introducing new processes. You have to add these digitized services to remain competitive.

qa_qIs cannibalizing your own business better or worse than losing market share to a more innovative competitor?

Michael Liebhold: You have to create that digital business and mandate it to grow. If you cannibalize the existing business, that’s just the price you have to pay.

Wang: Companies that cannibalize their own businesses are the ones that survive. If you don’t do it, someone else will. What we’re really talking about is “Why do you exist? Why does anyone want to buy from you?”

Anthony: I’m not sure that’s the right question. The fundamental question is what you’re using disruption to do. How do you use it to strengthen what you’re doing today, and what new things does it enable? I think you can get so consumed with all the changes that reconfigure what you’re doing today that you do only that. And if you do only that, your business becomes smaller, less significant, and less interesting.

qa_qSo how should companies think about smart disruption?

Anthony: Leaders have to reconfigure today and imagine tomorrow at the same time. It’s not either/or. Every disruptive threat has an equal, if not greater, opportunity. When disruption strikes, it’s a mistake only to feel the threat to your legacy business. It’s an opportunity to expand into a different marke.

SAP_Disruption_QA_images2400x1600_4Liebhold: It starts at the top. You can’t ask a CEO for an eight-figure budget to upgrade a cloud analytics system if the C-suite doesn’t understand the power of integrating data from across all the legacy systems. So the first task is to educate the senior team so it can approve the budgets.

Scott Underwood: Some of the most interesting questions are internal organizational questions, keeping people from feeling that their livelihoods are in danger or introducing ways to keep them engaged.

Leon Segal: Absolutely. If you want to enter a new market or introduce a new product, there’s a whole chain of stakeholders – including your own employees and the distribution chain. Their experiences are also new. Once you start looking for things that affect their experience, you can’t help doing it. You walk around the office and say, “That doesn’t look right, they don’t look happy. Maybe we should change that around.”

Fawn Fitter is a freelance writer specializing in business and technology. 

To learn more about how to disrupt your business without destroying it, read the in-depth report Digital Disruption: When to Cook the Golden Goose.

Download the PDF (1.2MB)

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Internet Of Things: Where Is All The Data Going?

Tim Clark

The Internet of Things (IoT) is no longer happening in a galaxy far, far away. It’s happening right here, right now. It may be in your pocket, on your wrist, in your clothes – heck, it might even be helping you drive your car.

In fact, IoT is moving so fast, we’re actually on the third wave, according to a panel of experts who weighed in on the topic during a recent episode of Internet of Things with Game-Changers, presented by SAP.

However, a nagging questions arises when it comes to this third IoT wave: What’s going to happen to all the data that’s being collected?

Coping with IoT reality

Gray Scott, futurist and founder/CEO of seriouswonder.com believes serious questions remain around IoT data collection because technology is moving faster than we can cope with.

“The main thing I’m concerned with right now, is getting people to understand that the Internet of Things is already in their lives,” said Scott. “So if you look around your house, either your television, refrigerator, or some of your appliances – they are probably already connected.”

And because IoT is now permeating our everyday lives, it must provide tangible results to consumers and businesses, according to JR Fuller of HP Enterprises.

“It can’t just take our data and subject us to additional advertising, which is one of the ways that it pays for itself,” said Fuller. “It has to provide something to us. It has to provide convenience.”

Evangelizing IoT convenience

The conveniences of IoT, such as a refrigerator that breaks down and automatically alerts the manufacturer to send a repairman, needs to be evangelized during this critical time, said Ira Berk, Vice President of Digital Transformation Solutions, SAP. Making proper use of the massive amounts of data IoT generates also plays a critical role in evangelizing its benefits.

“Think about what happens when you start to mix and match different sources of information,” said Berk. “You start to understand the data behind the world around you. In your house, car, environment, earth, public transportation, smart cities and factories. What questions can you ask that you wouldn’t even imagine being able to ask before, because you can start to synthesize the information?”

Gray Scott believes synthesizing different data sources “is a continuum of everything,” a great example being traffic in urban areas. Apps like Waze and Google Maps help drivers circumvent traffic.

“It’s a physical thing that can grab a hold of data and literally rearrange our lives by changing the direction you take your car in,” said Scott. “This continuum is going to keep building on itself as we move forward into the future.”

Living in a post-privacy world

While the general populace may not want to admit it, we are living in a post-privacy world. Anything put online is made public and everything that can be hacked, will. The question is what do we do with all of that data? Can we rise to a higher state of humanity and not just use data for advertising purposes, but to make our lives more convenient?

“I think we don’t mind giving up some of our personal information if it benefits us,” said JR Fuller. “It makes for a very interesting time, especially companies that can add value to bridge the gap and help enterprises achieve the benefit that we know are possible with IoT.”

Internet of Things with Game-Changers, presented by SAP, is hosted by Bonnie D. Graham. Listen to this broadcast in its entirety here.

This story originally appeared on SAP Business Trends.

Top image: Shutterstock

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About Tim Clark

Tim Clark is the Head of Brand Journalism at SAP. He is responsible for evangelizing and implementing writing best practices that generate results across blog channels, integrated marketing plans and native advertising efforts.