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Liberating Accountants To Be Human

Rob Leesberg

Robotic process automation is close to a technological marvel. It captures data from different applications to process every accounting transaction, and its benefit to accounting efficiency is undeniable. But to think robots are a replacement for human beings is folly.

In the world of accounting and finance, robotic process automation, or RPA, effectively performs the rote, repetitive, and tedious manual work typically executed by accountants. It does this by extending automated functionality to processes, systems, and data beyond the reach of interfaces to facilitate the integration of disparate financial systems.

This value has not gone unnoticed. One-third of finance leaders in a recent survey by Genpact Research stated that RPA tools and applications are having a positive operational impact in their organizations, with more than half positing that RPA will have the greatest impact of all finance and accounting tools over the next two years. (RPA technologies are used extensively in BlackLine products—editor)

By capturing and processing the data that creates a financial transaction, RPA takes over many of the number-crunching activities performed by accountants. Because machines do things the same way all the time, the numbers add up perfectly, minus the risk of human error. Since accounting and finance is the foundation of any corporate strategy, this is great news. Such crucial underpinnings should not be weakened by manual labor.

No robots here

What RPA doesn’t do is replace accountants, as the recent New York Times article “The New Bookkeeper Is a Robot asserted. Accountants are still needed to do something for which they have the nuanced skills—but not often the time— to do: study the numbers to learn where the business is losing or gaining speed. This is crucial information for a CFO entrusted with strategic resource-allocation responsibilities, where the accountants’ daily analyses can help determine where best to spend or draw back capital.

RPA frees well-educated accountants from their manual tasks and sharpens their focus on analytics and forecasting, assisting them in delivering added value to the CFO and other finance leaders. No longer preoccupied with manual labor, accountants can extract deeper meaning from the financial data. They can then apply these analyses to other business data to enhance the decision-making capabilities of financial experts in all segments of the organization.

Accountable for backup

This is just one of many ways accountants can provide a critical service. Instead of ticking things off a list, accountants can hold others accountable for the backup behind the numbers. They can undertake forensic accounting procedures to analyze financial information for use in legal proceedings or to ensure compliance with fast-evolving global regulations.

They can also put their minds to assisting financial planning and analysis in making timelier forecasts, and advise the CFO on what to do with surplus capital. They can look at the books and instinctively know if something is not right, making them invaluable to ferreting out fraud—assuming they have the time to do this.

Accountants have deep financial expertise that can be applied to other strategic needs. Since a company’s every transaction carries an element of risk, the accountants can be trained to create more robust risk models. Armed with real-time knowledge produced by the robotic accounting software, accountants can even anticipate newer problems and alert appropriate people to take action.

To take this even further, imagine if accountants could compare current business data to developing macroeconomic and geopolitical risks and opportunities—getting ahead of a Brexit or avoiding the impact of the oil crisis. There’s no reason to believe that accountants must remain internally focused. Not in today’s fast-paced global business environment.

The bottom line is that RPA will change the accounting and finance landscape for the better. It can reposition accountants from the “back office” to provide valuable insights on business performance to the Office of Finance. RPA doesn’t threaten accountants; it empowers them to be exceptional.

This article originally appeared on BlackLine.com, and is republished by permission. For more on this topic, read “Build Your Future In 2017: Tech and Trends.”

Comments

Rob Leesberg

About Rob Leesberg

Rob Leesberg is managing director at finance automation software provider, BlackLine, responsible for SAP technology and integration. Rob has over 20 years of experience improving financial governance in SAP software. Prior to BlackLine, Leesberg was founder and chief of solution design at Runbook, a provider of financial solutions for companies running SAP software, which was acquired by BlackLine in 2016. Mr. Leesberg holds a Masters of Business Administration from Delta University

High Stakes, High Rewards: Best Practices In Advanced Financial Analytics

Jayne Landry

Part one of a two-part series

How do best practices in data and analytics benefit the organizations that lead in these areas? According to a new study by EY and Forbes Insights, analytics leaders report gains in operating margins and revenues of 15% or more, while also seeing significant improvement in their risk profiles. In contrast, less-mature analytics practitioners typically experience breakdowns at critical stages of the business initiative process, starting when the company identifies new business opportunities and models ways to act on insights to measure outcomes of their data-driven strategies.

There are major advantages for companies that correct these problems. One of the most important underlying factors that fuels success is having a strategy that combines an enterprise-wide approach to data with resources that serve the unique needs of individual business units. Analytics often starts at the line-of-business level, where there’s a specific business problem that the department is trying to solve. This gives them the ability to address a specific need, but it comes at a cost in terms of security, trust, and organizational scale.

An enterprise-wide, collaborative approach

The key to analytics maturity is taking the step from having a series of ad hoc, federated activities to an approach that spans the organization and expands the benefits of data and analytics to all units. This requires close collaboration among a cross-section of business and technology leaders. The enterprise strategy must be embraced by everyone from the top executives to people in every department – and beyond your four walls to suppliers and customers.

In addition to a cultural shift, this broad strategy also requires a portfolio of data and analytics technologies, ranging from programs for data discovery and dashboards to predictive analytics. It’s best when all of these components run on a single platform, so organizations can have agility for individual use cases, while also developing trust in the data that comes from consistent management, security, and governance. The best practice is to combine top-level solutions, like the executive digital boardroom on a single platform, while departments like HR, finance, and marketing can leverage the same technology for their needs.

A strategic road map for gaining the highest returns

We recommend addressing this need starting with strategy-assessment services to help enterprise leaders identify analytics projects and assess their potential business benefits and investment returns. The strategy sessions then prioritize projects based on which ones will offer the highest returns and deliver value the fastest. In this way, companies can create a road map showing what the next project will be and the one after that. Looking at analytics from a portfolio perspective like this helps organizations put resources in the right places and generate the best results.

Many of the point solutions on the market address the analytics needs of business units, but fail to support enterprise security policies. A single platform brings these areas together.

The platform should address business agility with applications such as a data visualization program for business users and a cloud solution for planning, predictive analytics, and business intelligence – along with enterprise levels of scale and security. This way, when people try to access content, administrators can immediately authenticate them to make sure they’re viewing only the data they’re allowed to see. This is one of the ways to create an enterprise strategy while still addressing business agility.

Read the full report from EY and Forbes Insights, Data & Advanced Analytics: High Stakes, High Rewards.

Click on these links to learn more about business analytics solutions and how to build your BI strategy.

Follow SAP Finance online: @SAPFinance (Twitter)  | LinkedIn | FacebookYouTube

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Jayne Landry

About Jayne Landry

Jayne Landry is the global vice president and general manager for Business Intelligence at SAP. Ms. Landry joined Crystal Decisions in 2002 and came into SAP through the Business Objects acquisition in 2007. A seasoned executive with 20+ years of experience in the technology sector, Jayne has held leadership roles in high-tech companies in the CRM, mobility, and cloud applications space. Ms. Landry holds a Bachelor of Commerce degree from the University of Auckland, and has continued executive development with Queen’s University, Ontario, and through work with the Sauder School of Business at the University of British Columbia.

GDPR: Point Solution Or Enterprise Solution?

Neil Patrick

In one of my previous blogs on the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), I examined the complexity of GDPR and noted that it was complicated enough without having to manage incremental point solutions to sticky tape over pain points as they become evident. Then recently, I read a 19-page summary of niche GDPR solutions that are currently available. Although each of these solutions is valuable for some very specific needs, I still see some drawbacks.

Here’s the problem: They pick niche areas to solve, and they don’t talk to each other. This approach introduces a major area of exposure with regard to GDPR compliance: its impact is incredibly large, intrusive, cross-business, and inter-business. Companies cannot just pick the top two of the most important GDPR aspects and be done with it. More is needed for GDPR; therefore, more pieces of sticky tape are needed. Because different vendors supply these solutions, the software supply chain proliferates again, instead of heading in the direction of reduced total cost of ownership or simplified supplier relationships.

A recent GDPR event speaker, on behalf of a GDPR regulator, stressed the need for evidence of accountability, governance, and sustainable processes within GDPR compliance. Of course, in theory, this can be achieved with Excel spreadsheets, niche solutions, and emails. However, as an ongoing business-as-usual procedure for GDPR compliance, this approach quickly becomes unwieldy, unmanageable, very time-intensive, inaccurate, and ultimately ineffective. I would not want to tell a regulator who is auditing me for GDPR compliance, or during a data-breach event, that this was my master plan.
core business areas impacted
A strategic, repeatable approach opens an opportunity to optimise processes and reduce internal costs – leading to enterprise business resilience and process improvement as well as enterprise GDPR compliance. Adopting enterprise-ready, proven technologies for GDPR compliance will also allow you meet a substantial number of other regulatory or policy compliance needs with the same level of investment.


Experienced services and partners, plus legal advice, are required to guide a program towards GDPR compliance. For this reason, companies need to buy into GDPR for the long haul. The eye-watering magnitude of the potential fines springing from a very broad definition of a data breach suggests that this requires serious attention and an embedded enterprise answer.

Personally, I do not foresee a single monolithic solution covering everything for GDPR compliance. Why? It does not make sense in the modern complex IT landscape. However, it is achievable to implement a relatively small solution set that provides a pragmatic end-to-end answer for GDPR compliance.

Get the latest information on GDPR compliance. Attend the live stream session “Get Ready for EU GDPR Compliance,” one of many events taking place at the SAP Innovation Forum, hosted by SAP UKI, on March 1, 2017. Neil Patrick, EMEA Center of Excellence Business Development and Evangelist at SAP, will provide insight on what businesses should consider when complying with GDPR requirements.

Comments

Neil Patrick

About Neil Patrick

Neil Patrick is director of the GRC Center of Excellence in EMEA for SAP.

3 Ways Robots Will Co-Evolve with Humans

Christopher Koch

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Christopher Koch

About Christopher Koch

Christopher Koch is the Editorial Director of the SAP Center for Business Insight. He is an experienced publishing professional, researcher, editor, and writer in business, technology, and B2B marketing. Share your thoughts with Chris on Twitter @Ckochster.

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Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Melissa Friedman

About Melissa Friedman

Melissa Friedman is a senior marketing manager of Global Partner Operations at SAP. She manages SAP Virtual Agency, a multi-language, online demand-generation platform for SAP partners. In her spare time, Melissa is a professional photographer who specializes in wedding, bar/bat mitzvah, and portrait photography. Follow Melissa on Twitter and LinkedIn, or view her photography work.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Adam Winfield

About Adam Winfield

Adam Winfield writes about technology, how it's affecting industries, how it's affecting businesses, and how it's affecting people.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Gavin Mooney

About Gavin Mooney

Gavin Mooney is a utilities industry solution specialist for SAP. From a background in Engineering and IT, Gavin has been working in the utilities industry with SAP products for nearly 15 years. He has had the privilege of working with a number of Electricity, Gas and Water Utilities across the globe to implement SAP’s Industry Solution for Utilities. He now works with utilities to help them identify the best way to run simple and run better with SAP's latest products. Gavin loves to network and build lasting business relationships and is passionate about cleantech and the fundamental transformation currently shaking up the utilities industry.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Kris Hansen

About Kris Hansen

Kris Hansen is senior principal, Financial Services for SAP Canada. He is focused on understanding the financial services industry and identifying new and interesting digital opportunities that create disruptive business value.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Wilson Zhu

About Wilson Zhu

Wilson Zhu is a Marketing Manager at SAP. He focuses on the topic of Digital Supply Chain and IoT. Follow him on Twitter: @thezhu.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Roger Noia

About Roger Noia

Roger Noia is the director of Solution Marketing, SAP Jam Collaboration, at SAP. He is responsible for product marketing and sales enablement for our dedicated sales team as well as the broader SAP sales force selling SAP Jam.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Drew Schiller

About Drew Schiller

Drew Schiller co-founded and serves as the Chief Executive Officer of Validic, the leading digital health platform for connecting patient-generated data from apps, wearables, and in-home medical devices to the healthcare system. At Validic, Drew leads the corporate strategy, drives key day-to-day initiatives, and works closely with senior executives at partner organizations to stay ahead of the innovation curve.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Carolyn Beal

About Carolyn Beal

Carolyn Beal is senior director of Solution Marketing for Social Software at SAP. Her specialties include product marketing, marketing communications, CRM, and demand generation.

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awareness