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Conquer Supply Chain Resource Scarcity With These 7 Technologies

Gabriele Pfaffmann

“Scarce.” It’s a great word. It’s probably a term that first appeared to me on some middle school vocabulary test. Little did I know then that the word would become such an integral part of my everyday lexicon as I embarked on a career in supply chain.

Oddly enough, the word “scarce” has always invoked a feeling of fear in me. Part of that is likely because it’s a mere one letter off from the word “scare.” More likely, I think it’s the fact that running out of something, particularly some precious resource, is a truly frightening prospect.

In today’s increasingly complex supply chain industry, resource scarcity is certainly something to fear – but it’s an issue that organizations can unquestionably overcome as long as they have the right strategies in place.

SCM World recently published a report on the topic of resource scarcity. The paper provides insight on how supply chain organizations can manage their operations in a more sustainable fashion. In essence, the research firm touts technology as a key enabler to conquering today’s greatest resource scarcity concerns.

How is resource scarcity impacting supply chain organizations?

By 2050, the world’s population is expected to grow to 9.7 billion, up from approximately 7.4 billion today, according to a 2015 United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs report. This will put a tremendous strain on the world’s water, raw material, mineral, and energy resources.

A water shortage will greatly affect chemical and industrial companies that use the resource in their manufacturing processes.

The declining availability and, incidentally, rising costs of raw materials and minerals will adversely impact end-product affordability, which translates to supply chain organizations operating at a loss.

Oil and gas companies face similar obstacles, with energy resource shortages resulting in high levels of commodity price volatility.

On top of all this is the increasingly concerning issue of human resource scarcity, which 56% of supply chain executives refer to as “extremely challenging,” according to a recent SCM World survey.

Technology is the key to managing resource scarcity

While a majority of surveyed supply chain practitioners believe they’re successfully managing resource scarcity – with 66% proclaiming themselves to be “first movers” or “fast followers” – many still lack the capabilities of overcoming their challenges.

According to SCM World, and the organizations that are thriving in this area, these seven technologies hold the key to addressing natural resource scarcity and sustainability:

1. Blockchain

This online public ledger is a practical way for companies to trace the origin of raw materials back through the supply chain. With an available list of visible records, known as blocks, supply chain organizations can better keep track of their resource supply and plan for potential shortages.

2. Sensors

More and more enterprises are leveraging the power of sensors and other Internet of Things-enabled devices to monitor and manage the use of water, energy, and other resources at production plants and distribution centers.

3. Drones

The military uses drones for combat missions. Children and adults play with toy drones in their leisure time. Now, supply chain professionals are employing drones to do things like check for leaks in hard-to-access oil pipelines.

4. 3D printing

Businesses are using 3D printing for everything today, from action figures to food. In supply chain, organizations leverage the power of 3D printing to reduce waste during the production process.

5&6. Big Data analytics and GPS

Agricultural companies combine the capabilities of GPS and Big Data analytics to optimize their growth activities. They can use these technologies to scout for prime locations to harvest and gain insight on how to improve crop yields.

7. Social media

Businesses regularly mine social media for customer feedback and potential product quality concerns. Supply chain organizations are monitoring the chatter on social media in order to flag certain supply chain risks. For example, social media can help supply chain experts gain vital information on how people in an area are reacting to severe weather events that may result in supply chain disruptions or resource availability.

Don’t let resource scarcity doom your business

No supply chain organization is exempt from resource scarcity. At some point or another, your enterprise will be impacted by a shortage in water, minerals, raw materials, energy, or skilled labor, and you must understand how to overcome this obstacle.

Cutting-edge innovations, such as those listed above, can provide your company with greater visibility into its resources, as well as insight on how your organization can prevent and address its resource scarcity concerns internally and across the entire digital supply chain.

Download the full SCM World report – Resource Scarcity: Supply Chain Strategies for Sustainable Business – to learn more about managing resource scarcity with the latest technology and to find out how leading companies throughout supply chain are already achieving this.

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Gabriele Pfaffmann

About Gabriele Pfaffmann

Gabriele Pfaffmann is a member of the SAP Solution Marketing organization, responsible for the enterprise asset management (EAM) line of business. She joined SAP in 1996, holding positions in solution management and solution marketing, and is based in Walldorf, Germany.

Lenovo’s “Disciplined” Supply Chain Drives Global Leadership

John Ward

“Lenovo’s been the number one PC company for over three years now,” says Gerry Smith, an executive vice president at Lenovo and president of its Data Center Group, in a recent video.

In fact, Lenovo’s 2015 PC sales represented about 20% of total market share according to Gartner.

That’s a pretty remarkable accomplishment for a company that The Wall Street Journal, described, “as recently as 2005… was a little-known computer maker that sold only in China.”

But a lot has changed in the past 10 years or so – especially in Lenovo’s now worldwide supply chain.

These days, Lenovo has operations in 60 countries, customers around the planet, and it relies on a revamped supply chain driven by such thoroughly modern imperatives as sustainability, product security, real-time planning, and customer-centricity.

Major acquisitions deliver global growth

Lenovo’s dramatic growth has made headlines. In 2005, the company bought IBM’s personal computer business. Then, in 2014 came the acquisitions of both IBM’s Intel-based server business and Motorola Mobility.

And as a result of such bold moves, Lenovo has had to adapt to an increasingly global marketplace and a growing list of international standards and regulations.

As part of an integrated response to its full-scale globalization, Lenovo has established comprehensive sustainability programs across its broad supply chain. These initiatives address operations from internal manufacturing to packaging and logistics. Still other programs help Lenovo evaluate external suppliers on criteria such as employee working conditions, environmental footprint, and the use of environmentally preferred materials. In total, Lenovo reports that it uses more than 25 key indicators to measure vendor transparency, commitment, and performance.

“Working with trusted suppliers – as well as owning and running our own factories – promotes end-to-end security in Lenovo’s supply chain,” says Smith. “These controls help us ensure that products are built with components from known suppliers, guard against hijacking, and protect against compromised firmware updates once our products are deployed.”

Process efficiency is part of the plan

Lenovo’s global supply chain strategy also employs solutions designed to optimize process efficiency. For example, Lenovo implemented an advanced planning and optimization component on an in-memory computing platform to help plan and execute supply chain processes for the newly acquired server business. Additionally, the company partnered  co-developed new applications that support supplier collaboration and help to perform cost forecasting calculations in near real-time.

“We’ve dramatically improved our supply chain performance,” says Smith, “reducing our planning time from 10 hours to 10 minutes.”

As Smith sees it, Lenovo has all the tools in place “to make our supply chain, not only the best PC and server supply chain in the world, but one of the best supply chains across all industries.”

Others obviously agree with Smith’s assessment.

Gartner named Lenovo among its top 25 supply chain companies for 2016. In particular, Gartner cites the high-tech company for the “disciplined approach” it took to integrate its supply chain in the wake of recent acquisitions.

Gartner also notes that Lenovo’s supply chain team ran specific programs to enhance customer experience and operational excellence – like the creation of a customer social/digital platform for key global accounts that presents content tailored to each customer’s preference in terms of order status, new product information, and technical support information. Further, Gartner highlights the fact that Lenovo assigns a supply chain staff member as an executive sponsor for each major account.

A lot has changed since Lenovo was a little-known computer maker that sold only in China.

Please follow me on Twitter at @JohnGWard3.

  • Hear more from Lenovo’s Gerry Smith in this SAP video.
  • Read more about how Lenovo is optimizing supply chain efficiency in this SAP Business Transformation Study.

This story originally appeared on Business Trends on the SAP Community.

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The Internet Of Things: An Environmentalist’s Heaven Or Hell?

John Graham

Back in early December, The Guardian ran an article asking whether the Internet of Things will save or sacrifice the environment. As you’d expect, the answer is far from clear. Some environmentalists worry about the effects of producing, installing, and powering those billions of extra devices; others urge the use of IoT sensor networks to help us monitor and curb resource consumption and emissions.

On the surface, the thought of creating huge wireless sensor networks for the benefit of the environment seems paradoxical. However, there is a much bigger picture lurking underneath. The Global e-Sustainability Initiative’s (GeSI) recent #SMARTer2030 report suggests that IoT-related technologies could save “almost 10 times the carbon dioxide emissions that it generates by 2030 through reduced travel, smart buildings, and greater efficiencies in manufacturing and agriculture.”

Even if we achieve a situation in which physical IoT devices have a net positive effect on humanity’s carbon footprint, there is still the massive data transmission and storage growth to consider. Speaking as an executive of a company providing the cloud-based data platform for IoT networks, I can say that it’s in our best interests to keep energy consumption as low as possible, because it costs less. That’s why data centers are built with energy efficiency top of mind.

Ultimately, whether or not the IoT turns out to be an environmentalist’s dream will depend on how we apply its concepts. If it’s primarily used to stream endless high-quality video feeds 24 hours a day or for power-hungry gimmicks and trivialities, the footprint will be far worse than if it’s used directly to get resource and energy management under control. It seems unlikely that the private sector and consumers alone will summon the collective motivation to veer in the direction of the latter, so policy will need to keep up and be sound and assertive.

The attitude of disposability in Western society today is another issue altogether. Perfectly functional year-old smartphones and computers are piling up in landfills across the globe as consumers struggle to resist the lure of the latest model. Can the IoT buck this trend by being founded on sensor networks built to last? With the world trending away from centralized hardware and toward cloud-based software, it could be that upgrades to the virtual aspects of IoT will be enough to satisfy our lust for innovation, while the sensors hum away out of sight and out of mind.

Time will tell.

Register here to listen to an SAP Live webcast in which IBM’s IoT guru Michael Martin discusses the possibilities and challenges of our connected future.

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John Graham

About John Graham

John Graham is president of SAP Canada. Driving growth across SAP’s industry-leading cloud, mobile, and database solutions, he is helping more than 9,500 Canadian customers in 25 industries become best-run businesses.

3 Ways Robots Will Co-Evolve with Humans

Christopher Koch

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Christopher Koch

About Christopher Koch

Christopher Koch is the Editorial Director of the SAP Center for Business Insight. He is an experienced publishing professional, researcher, editor, and writer in business, technology, and B2B marketing. Share your thoughts with Chris on Twitter @Ckochster.

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Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Drew Schiller

About Drew Schiller

Drew Schiller co-founded and serves as the Chief Executive Officer of Validic, the leading digital health platform for connecting patient-generated data from apps, wearables, and in-home medical devices to the healthcare system. At Validic, Drew leads the corporate strategy, drives key day-to-day initiatives, and works closely with senior executives at partner organizations to stay ahead of the innovation curve.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Carolyn Beal

About Carolyn Beal

Carolyn Beal is senior director of Solution Marketing for Social Software at SAP. Her specialties include product marketing, marketing communications, CRM, and demand generation.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Jayne Landry

About Jayne Landry

Jayne Landry is the global vice president and general manager for Business Intelligence at SAP. Ms. Landry joined Crystal Decisions in 2002 and came into SAP through the Business Objects acquisition in 2007. A seasoned executive with 20+ years of experience in the technology sector, Jayne has held leadership roles in high-tech companies in the CRM, mobility, and cloud applications space. Ms. Landry holds a Bachelor of Commerce degree from the University of Auckland, and has continued executive development with Queen’s University, Ontario, and through work with the Sauder School of Business at the University of British Columbia.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim and Michael Rander

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Rick Knowles

About Rick Knowles

Rick Knowles is senior vice president (SVP) and general manager (GM) of the partnership between SAP SE and Apple, Inc. In this role, he oversees the strategic roadmap in building state-of-the-art applications for some of the most complex business systems in the world. Rick has been with SAP for close to 20 years, where he has held executive positions such as SVP and chief of staff, GM of One Customer Experience, and SVP and chief operating officer for SAP Americas, the company’s largest geographic market. You can follow him on Twitter @RickKnowlesSAP.

About Michael Rander

Michael Rander is the Global Research Director for Future Of Work at SAP. He is an experienced project manager, strategic and competitive market researcher, operations manager as well as an avid photographer, athlete, traveler and entrepreneur. Share your thoughts with Michael on Twitter @michaelrander.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Florian Wagner

About Florian Wagner

Florian Wagner is marketing director for IT audience messaging at SAP. Together with his team, he is responsible to address the IT audience and to drive relevant thought leadership topics. He writes about technology trends on digital transformation, cloud and platform strategies with a focus on customer experiences.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Michael Brenner

About Michael Brenner

Michael Brenner is a globally-recognized keynote speaker, author of  The Content Formula and the CEO of Marketing Insider GroupHe has worked in leadership positions in sales and marketing for global brands like SAP and Nielsen, as well as for thriving startups. Today, Michael shares his passion on leadership and marketing strategies that deliver customer value and business impact. He is recognized by the Huffington Post as a Top Business Keynote Speaker and   a top  CMO influencer by Forbes.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Verena Wiszinski

About Verena Wiszinski

Verena Wiszinski is a Senior Integrated Marketing Specialist within the Global IT Audience Marketing team at SAP. She enjoys staying connected with customers and thought leaders and talking first hand with them about their experiences, thoughts, and needs within business transformation.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

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awareness