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The (R)evolution of PLM, Part 3: Using Digital Twins Throughout The Product Lifecycle

John McNiff

In Part 1 of this series we explored why manufacturers must embrace “live” PLM. In Part 2 we examined the new dimensions of a product-centric enterprise. In Part 3 we look at the role of digital twins.

It’s time to start using digital twins throughout the product lifecycle. In fact, to compete in the digital economy, manufacturers will need to achieve a truly product-centric enterprise in which digital twins guide not only engineering and maintenance, but every business-critical function, from procurement to HR.

Why is this necessary? Because product lifecycles are shrinking. Companies are managing ever-growing streams of data. And customers are demanding product individualization. The only way for manufacturers to respond is to use digital twins to place the product – the highly configurable, endlessly customizable, increasingly connected product – at the center of their operations.

Double the insight

Digital twins are virtual representations of a real-world products or assets. They’re a Top 10 strategic trend for 2017, according to Gartner. And they’re part of a broader digital transformation in which IDC says companies will invest $2.1 trillion a year by 2019.

Digital twins aren’t a new concept, but their application throughout the product lifecycle is. Here are key ways smart manufacturers will leverage digital twins – and achieve a product-centric and model-based enterprise – across operations:

Design and engineering: Traditionally, digital twins have been used by design and engineering to create virtual representations for designing and enhancing products. In this application, the digital twin actually exists before its physical counterpart does, essentially starting out as a vision of what the product should be. But you can also capture data on in-the-field product use and apply that to the digital twin for continuous product improvement.

Maintenance and service: Today, the most common use case for digital twins is maintenance and service. By creating a virtual representation of an asset in the field using lightweight model visualization, and then capturing data from smart sensors embedded in the asset, you can gain a complete picture of real-world performance and operating conditions. You can also simulate that real-world environment for predictive maintenance. Let’s say you manufacture wind turbines. You can capture data on rotor speed, wind speed, operating temperature, ambient temperature, humidity, and so on to understand and predict product performance. By doing so, you can schedule maintenance before a crucial part breaks – optimizing uptime and saving time and cost for a repair.

Quality control: Just as digital twins can help with maintenance and service, they can predictively improve quality during manufacturing. You can also use digital twins to compare quality data across multiple products to better understand global quality issues and quickly visualize issues against the model. And you can apply data collected by maintenance and service to achieve ongoing quality improvements.

Customization: As products become more customizable, digital twins will allow design and engineering to model the various permutations. But digital twins can also incorporate customer demand and usage data to enhance customization options. That sounds obvious, but in the past it was very difficult to incorporate customer input into the manufacturing process. Let’s say you sell high-end custom bikes. You might allow customers to choose different colors, wheels, and other details. By capturing customer preferences in the digital twin, you can get a picture of customer demand. And by capturing customer usage data, you can understand how custom configurations affect product performance. So you can offer the most reliable options or allow customers to configure your products based on performance attributes. You can also visualize lightweight representations of the twin without the burden of heavyweight design systems and parameters.

Finance and procurement: In our custom-configured bike example, different configurations involve different costs. And those different costs involve not only the cost of the various components, but also the cost for assembling the various configurations. By capturing sales data in the digital twin, you can understand which configurations are being ordered and how configuration-specific revenues compare to the cost to build each configuration. What’s more, you can link that data with supplier information. That will help you understand which suppliers contribute to product configurations that perform well in the field. It also can help you identify opportunities to cost-effectively rid yourself of excess supply.

Sales and marketing: The digital twin can also inform sales and marketing. For instance, you can use the digital twin to populate an online product configurator and e-commerce website. That way you can be sure what you’re selling is always tied directly to what you’re engineering in the design studio and what you’re servicing in the field.

Human resources: The digital twin can even extend into HR. For example, you can use the digital twin to understand training and certification needs and be sure the right people are trained on the right product features.

One twin, many views

Digital twins should underlie all manufacturing operations. Ideally you should have a single set of digital twin master data that resides in a central location. That will give you one version of the truth, and with “in-memory” computing-based networks plus a lightweight, change-controlled model capability, you’ll be able to analyze and visualize that data rapidly.

But not all business functions care about the entire data set. You need to deliver the right data to the right people at the right time. Design and engineering requires one set of data, with every specification and tolerance needed to create and continuously improve the product. Sales and marketing requires another set of data, with the features and functions customers can select. And so on.

Ultimately, as the digital product innovation platform extends the dimensions of traditional PLM, at the heart of PLM is an extended version of the digital twin. In future blogs we’ll talk about how you can leverage the latest-generation platform from SAP, based on SAP S/4HANA and SAP’s platform for the Internet of Everything, to achieve a live, visual, and intelligent product-centric enterprise.

Learn how a live supply chain can help your business, visit us at SAP.com.

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John McNiff

About John McNiff

John McNiff is the Vice President of Solution Management for the R&D/Engineering line-of-business business unit at SAP. John has held a number of sales and business development roles at SAP, focused on the manufacturing and engineering topics.

Sink Or Swim In ‘17: Embracing The Mobile Mind Shift Keeps You Afloat, Part 2

Erin Giordano

Part 2 of a series. Read Part 1.

What’s the biggest opportunity for finance leaders in 2017? During a recent webinar, Forrester Research VP and principal analyst Paul Hamerman said, “There is an opportunity to use technology to lessen the burden of managing expenses, risk, and compliance activities so that finance [leaders] can be more involved in the strategic side of the business, that is, helping the business grow, innovate, and serve its customers.”

So what’s holding finance leaders back? The burden of managing risk and compliance issues and expense activities are the biggest culprits.

In a new Forrester study of 500 global finance decision makers, respondents revealed that 76% of their time is spent on less strategic activities, such as managing risk and driving compliance, as well as expenses.

 

Source: Harnessing the power of modern T&E tools for strategic financial management

How can finance leaders change this? While this finding may not be surprising to many, as this has been roadblock for many years, finance leaders can now change this by carefully assessing their current travel and expense processes and inefficiencies by modernizing them with technology. For example, T&E modules in conventional on-premise ERP software limit mobile functionality and are not integrated with travel booking systems or data.

By modernizing T&E business processes and using technology that offers an open platform, CFOs and their teams will have more bandwidth to spend time on more strategic activities. Also, modernizing this process will enable employees to become better equipped to spend reasonably and track expenses properly. As the Forrester study states, “While the CFO is ultimately responsible for managing employee-generated spend, improving these processes can help empower individual users to better manage budgets and expenses. This ends up benefiting both the individual users and the business.”

Learn more
Listen to Hamerman speak on this topic: Harnessing the power of modern T&E tools for strategic financial management

Download this Forrester Consulting thought leadership paper: Financial Leaders Must Embrace T&E Solutions Strategically to Drive Growth and Innovation

Follow SAP Finance online: @SAPFinance (Twitter)  | LinkedIn | FacebookYouTube

Comments

Erin Giordano

About Erin Giordano

Erin Giordano is senior marketing manager, Enterprise for Concur, and has held various strategic positions that have helped global companies succeed in their thought leadership and business expansion efforts. Her areas of expertise range in topics from duty of care to global mobility spanning multiple industries.

How Continuous Accounting Can Transform Your Business

Elizabeth Milne

Last month I wrote a blog post, “What Is Continuous Accounting?”, which shared information on a webinar on the topic (watch the replay). Today, I’d like to share a research paper about continuous accounting. We worked with Ventana Research to develop this fantastic five-page paper.

Here’s a snippet: “The continuous accounting approach integrates people, processes, information, and technology to achieve a transformation of the finance function and its corporate role. Continuous accounting is based on three principles:

  • Use technology to distribute departmental workloads continuously across account of periods.
  • Support continuous, end-to-end process management to enhance efficiency and increase data integrity.
  • Adopt a continuous improvement approach to overcome inertia and the ‘we’ve always done it this way’ mindset to which finance staffs are particularly prone.”

The paper examines each of these key principles in further detail.

Continuous accounting: transformative for finance

The concept and implementation of continuous accounting is transformational for accounting and the finance department. The ability to truly harness technology to enable an “always-on” approach will change the processes and traditional approaches. As you examine existing processes and evaluate how technology can improve them, you’ll understand how the traditional approaches we designed were based on the technologies that existed at the time.

Computers and accounting aren’t usually considered to be exciting, sexy, sizzling topics. But for me, the thought of what is possible is really exciting. Transformation of accounting processes and period-end closing and the production of financial reports is very refreshing. As a colleague once told me, accountants aren’t boring people; they just get excited about boring things.

Continuous accounting: critical for the business

The concept of continuous improvement is also intriguing. For accountants, doing the same thing period after period can be tedious, but transformation can be inspiring. Providing financial information is critical for any business, being able to access that information sooner allows organizations to make better decisions. A closer relationship between the accounting and operational departments fosters collaboration and the ability to provide the information that is most relevant.

Improving these processes also enables people to work smarter, not harder. This can help with work/life balance since it can reduce the number of hours worked at period end by distributing tasks throughout the period.

After all, the period-end close and reporting is required, speeding that close is desired, and continuous accounting is inspired and admired.

What do you think—would continuous accounting be transformative for your business? Connect with me here or on Twitter: @ElizabethEMilne.

Learn more

Read the free research paper here.

This article originally appeared on the SAP BusinessObjects Analytics blog and has been republished with permission.

Follow SAP Finance online: @SAPFinance (Twitter)  | LinkedIn | FacebookYouTube

Comments

Elizabeth Milne

About Elizabeth Milne

Elizabeth Milne has over 20 years of experience improving the software solutions for multi-national, multi-billion dollar organizations. Her finance career began working at Walt Disney, then Warner Bros. in the areas of financial consolidation, budgeting, and financial reporting. She subsequently moved to the software industry and has held positions including implementation consultant and manager, account executive, pre-sales consultant, solution management team at SAP, Business Objects and Cartesis. She graduated with an Executive MBA from Northwestern University’s Kellogg Graduate School of Management. In 2014 she published her first book “Accelerated Financial Closing with SAP.” She currently manages the accounting and financial close portfolio for SAP Product Marketing. You can follow her on twitter @ElizabethEMilne

How Emotionally Aware Computing Can Bring Happiness to Your Organization

Christopher Koch


Do you feel me?

Just as once-novel voice recognition technology is now a ubiquitous part of human–machine relationships, so too could mood recognition technology (aka “affective computing”) soon pervade digital interactions.

Through the application of machine learning, Big Data inputs, image recognition, sensors, and in some cases robotics, artificially intelligent systems hunt for affective clues: widened eyes, quickened speech, and crossed arms, as well as heart rate or skin changes.




Emotions are big business

The global affective computing market is estimated to grow from just over US$9.3 billion a year in 2015 to more than $42.5 billion by 2020.

Source: “Affective Computing Market 2015 – Technology, Software, Hardware, Vertical, & Regional Forecasts to 2020 for the $42 Billion Industry” (Research and Markets, 2015)

Customer experience is the sweet spot

Forrester found that emotion was the number-one factor in determining customer loyalty in 17 out of the 18 industries it surveyed – far more important than the ease or effectiveness of customers’ interactions with a company.


Source: “You Can’t Afford to Overlook Your Customers’ Emotional Experience” (Forrester, 2015)


Humana gets an emotional clue

Source: “Artificial Intelligence Helps Humana Avoid Call Center Meltdowns” (The Wall Street Journal, October 27, 2016)

Insurer Humana uses artificial intelligence software that can detect conversational cues to guide call-center workers through difficult customer calls. The system recognizes that a steady rise in the pitch of a customer’s voice or instances of agent and customer talking over one another are causes for concern.

The system has led to hard results: Humana says it has seen an 28% improvement in customer satisfaction, a 63% improvement in agent engagement, and a 6% improvement in first-contact resolution.


Spread happiness across the organization

Source: “Happiness and Productivity” (University of Warwick, February 10, 2014)

Employers could monitor employee moods to make organizational adjustments that increase productivity, effectiveness, and satisfaction. Happy employees are around 12% more productive.




Walking on emotional eggshells

Whether customers and employees will be comfortable having their emotions logged and broadcast by companies is an open question. Customers may find some uses of affective computing creepy or, worse, predatory. Be sure to get their permission.


Other limiting factors

The availability of the data required to infer a person’s emotional state is still limited. Further, it can be difficult to capture all the physical cues that may be relevant to an interaction, such as facial expression, tone of voice, or posture.



Get a head start


Discover the data

Companies should determine what inferences about mental states they want the system to make and how accurately those inferences can be made using the inputs available.


Work with IT

Involve IT and engineering groups to figure out the challenges of integrating with existing systems for collecting, assimilating, and analyzing large volumes of emotional data.


Consider the complexity

Some emotions may be more difficult to discern or respond to. Context is also key. An emotionally aware machine would need to respond differently to frustration in a user in an educational setting than to frustration in a user in a vehicle.

 


 

download arrowTo learn more about how affective computing can help your organization, read the feature story Empathy: The Killer App for Artificial Intelligence.


Comments

Christopher Koch

About Christopher Koch

Christopher Koch is the Editorial Director of the SAP Center for Business Insight. He is an experienced publishing professional, researcher, editor, and writer in business, technology, and B2B marketing. Share your thoughts with Chris on Twitter @Ckochster.

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Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Granner Smith

About Granner Smith

Granner Smith is a Professional writer and writes for various topics like social,technology,fashion, health and home improvement etc. I have experience in this field. So I would like to share my knowledge with your blog to help people to learn something new.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Michael Brenner

About Michael Brenner

Michael Brenner is a globally-recognized keynote speaker, author of  The Content Formula and the CEO of Marketing Insider GroupHe has worked in leadership positions in sales and marketing for global brands like SAP and Nielsen, as well as for thriving startups. Today, Michael shares his passion on leadership and marketing strategies that deliver customer value and business impact. He is recognized by the Huffington Post as a Top Business Keynote Speaker and   a top  CMO influencer by Forbes.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Paul Gilbert

About Paul Gilbert

Paul Gilbert is a professional blogger, an enthusiast who loves to write on several niches.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Andy David

About Andy David

Andy David is Director of Healthcare, Life Sciences, and Postal Industry Markets for the Asia-Pacific Japan region at SAP. He has more than 14 years of professional experience in IT applications for government, health, and manufacturing industries. He has been working with Public Sector organisation for over 12 years. As a member of the Public Sector team for Asia Pacific and Japan, Andy plays a pivotal role in determining the strategy across the region, which covers market analysis, business development, and customer reference, and building the SAP brand.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Erin Giordano

About Erin Giordano

Erin Giordano is senior marketing manager, Enterprise for Concur, and has held various strategic positions that have helped global companies succeed in their thought leadership and business expansion efforts. Her areas of expertise range in topics from duty of care to global mobility spanning multiple industries.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

David Trites

About David Trites

David Trites is a Director of SAP Global Marketing. He is responsible for producing interesting and compelling customer stories that will humanize the SAP brand, support sales and marketing teams across SAP, and increase the awareness of SAP in key markets.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Harin Nanayakkaara

About Harin Nanayakkaara

Harin Nanayakkaara is part of attune’s leadership team and heads the global marketing, branding and communication efforts. He is passionate about technology and its role in shaping the fashion landscape, and has worked closely on delivering business value to clients such as Crocs and Brooks Brothers.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Brian Wasson

About Brian Wasson

Brian Wasson is the Director of Global Marketing & Communications at SAP. His specialties include strategic and hands-on experience in social media, website and intranet management, sustainability and CSR communications, public relations/media relations, employee (internal) communications, publication editing and management, and direct marketing.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

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Tiffany Rowe

About Tiffany Rowe

Tiffany Rowe is a marketing administrator who assists in contributing resourceful content. Tiffany prides herself in her ability to provide high-quality content that readers will find valuable.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tracy Vides

About Tracy Vides

Tracy is a content marketer and social media consultant who works with small businesses and startups to increase their visibility. Although new to the digital marketing scene, Tracy has started off well by building a good reputation for herself, with posts featured on Steamfeed, Business 2 Community and elsewhere. Hit her up @TracyVides on Twitter.

Tags:

awareness