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The (R)evolution of PLM, Part 3: Using Digital Twins Throughout The Product Lifecycle

John McNiff

In Part 1 of this series we explored why manufacturers must embrace “live” PLM. In Part 2 we examined the new dimensions of a product-centric enterprise. In Part 3 we look at the role of digital twins.

It’s time to start using digital twins throughout the product lifecycle. In fact, to compete in the digital economy, manufacturers will need to achieve a truly product-centric enterprise in which digital twins guide not only engineering and maintenance, but every business-critical function, from procurement to HR.

Why is this necessary? Because product lifecycles are shrinking. Companies are managing ever-growing streams of data. And customers are demanding product individualization. The only way for manufacturers to respond is to use digital twins to place the product – the highly configurable, endlessly customizable, increasingly connected product – at the center of their operations.

Double the insight

Digital twins are virtual representations of a real-world products or assets. They’re a Top 10 strategic trend for 2017, according to Gartner. And they’re part of a broader digital transformation in which IDC says companies will invest $2.1 trillion a year by 2019.

Digital twins aren’t a new concept, but their application throughout the product lifecycle is. Here are key ways smart manufacturers will leverage digital twins – and achieve a product-centric and model-based enterprise – across operations:

Design and engineering: Traditionally, digital twins have been used by design and engineering to create virtual representations for designing and enhancing products. In this application, the digital twin actually exists before its physical counterpart does, essentially starting out as a vision of what the product should be. But you can also capture data on in-the-field product use and apply that to the digital twin for continuous product improvement.

Maintenance and service: Today, the most common use case for digital twins is maintenance and service. By creating a virtual representation of an asset in the field using lightweight model visualization, and then capturing data from smart sensors embedded in the asset, you can gain a complete picture of real-world performance and operating conditions. You can also simulate that real-world environment for predictive maintenance. Let’s say you manufacture wind turbines. You can capture data on rotor speed, wind speed, operating temperature, ambient temperature, humidity, and so on to understand and predict product performance. By doing so, you can schedule maintenance before a crucial part breaks – optimizing uptime and saving time and cost for a repair.

Quality control: Just as digital twins can help with maintenance and service, they can predictively improve quality during manufacturing. You can also use digital twins to compare quality data across multiple products to better understand global quality issues and quickly visualize issues against the model. And you can apply data collected by maintenance and service to achieve ongoing quality improvements.

Customization: As products become more customizable, digital twins will allow design and engineering to model the various permutations. But digital twins can also incorporate customer demand and usage data to enhance customization options. That sounds obvious, but in the past it was very difficult to incorporate customer input into the manufacturing process. Let’s say you sell high-end custom bikes. You might allow customers to choose different colors, wheels, and other details. By capturing customer preferences in the digital twin, you can get a picture of customer demand. And by capturing customer usage data, you can understand how custom configurations affect product performance. So you can offer the most reliable options or allow customers to configure your products based on performance attributes. You can also visualize lightweight representations of the twin without the burden of heavyweight design systems and parameters.

Finance and procurement: In our custom-configured bike example, different configurations involve different costs. And those different costs involve not only the cost of the various components, but also the cost for assembling the various configurations. By capturing sales data in the digital twin, you can understand which configurations are being ordered and how configuration-specific revenues compare to the cost to build each configuration. What’s more, you can link that data with supplier information. That will help you understand which suppliers contribute to product configurations that perform well in the field. It also can help you identify opportunities to cost-effectively rid yourself of excess supply.

Sales and marketing: The digital twin can also inform sales and marketing. For instance, you can use the digital twin to populate an online product configurator and e-commerce website. That way you can be sure what you’re selling is always tied directly to what you’re engineering in the design studio and what you’re servicing in the field.

Human resources: The digital twin can even extend into HR. For example, you can use the digital twin to understand training and certification needs and be sure the right people are trained on the right product features.

One twin, many views

Digital twins should underlie all manufacturing operations. Ideally you should have a single set of digital twin master data that resides in a central location. That will give you one version of the truth, and with “in-memory” computing-based networks plus a lightweight, change-controlled model capability, you’ll be able to analyze and visualize that data rapidly.

But not all business functions care about the entire data set. You need to deliver the right data to the right people at the right time. Design and engineering requires one set of data, with every specification and tolerance needed to create and continuously improve the product. Sales and marketing requires another set of data, with the features and functions customers can select. And so on.

Ultimately, as the digital product innovation platform extends the dimensions of traditional PLM, at the heart of PLM is an extended version of the digital twin. In future blogs we’ll talk about how you can leverage the latest-generation platform from SAP, based on SAP S/4HANA and SAP’s platform for the Internet of Everything, to achieve a live, visual, and intelligent product-centric enterprise.

Learn how a live supply chain can help your business, visit us at SAP.com.

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John McNiff

About John McNiff

John McNiff is the Vice President of Solution Management for the R&D/Engineering line-of-business business unit at SAP. John has held a number of sales and business development roles at SAP, focused on the manufacturing and engineering topics.

Bring Agility Into The Finance Department To Enable True Business Partnering

Scott Taylor

Traditional methods of running your planning, budgeting, and forecasting processes, which rely heavily on manual effort and spreadsheet-based activities, are outdated. Higher demands and shorter cycles dictated by external market factors, the continuous pursuit of improved efficiency, and pressure to reduce costs are forcing CFOs to seek ways to transform their processes and operations. The key to this transformation is agility.

Organizations need more agile financial processes to enable the business to grow. They need rolling budgets and forecasts that better predict and react to evolving market conditions; continuous forecasting and real-time, ad hoc reporting; and process benchmarking that enables action based on that information. To adopt such innovative financial strategies, organizations must embrace an “agile finance” approach that is unencumbered by common challenges inherent in traditional systems, data integrity, and integration scenarios. Reengineering finance processes supported by new technology and redefining the finance strategy free up the wealth of skill and knowledge needed to enable true business partnering and deep analytics.

This approach involves using a set of related and integrated applications, which comprise three main functions:

  • Finance performance management: The “heavy lifting” component of agile finance, finance performance management applications provide native, real-time integration with source data systems. Integrated applications for business planning combine demand-side and sales planning with traditional financial budgeting and forecasting to form the core of finance performance management.
  • Data-driven processes: Agile finance gives you access to the data and information you want when you want it. It requires an environment that can store, manage, and process large data volumes regardless of the source, format, or type. In-memory technology unlocks the power of finance by providing seamless integration and unparalleled processing speed.
  • Analytics: Modern analytics applications provide tools that combine financial information with operational information to create a largely user-driven graphical environment for analysis and reporting. Supported by in-memory technology and vast amounts of data, predictive analytics is no longer just a tool for actuaries and should be leveraged in everyday planning.

Simply implementing new technology on top of existing processes will yield only a few benefits. Instead, agile finance presents the opportunity to completely reengineer traditional finance processes. For example, the technology to implement rolling forecasting has been available for many years. The business process change required to forego the traditional annual budget and accept rolling forecasting as a means to measure performance is much harder.

An agile finance approach is not an “out-of-the-box” solution; it is a journey that finance must begin, evolve with, and take the entire organization with them. New deployment options, such as cloud, enable a more flexible alternative to traditional license procurement, making a phased implementation approach much easier.

By unleashing opportunities with agile finance, organizations can achieve significant and tangible efficiencies and leverage data and analytics to drive their business into the future. Adopting agile finance supports simpler data management by making financial process statuses fully traceable and visible, leading to fewer controls and more real-time information. This real-time information leads to more timely and actionable financial information that allows managers to avoid problems and recognize opportunities thereby transforming the business.

Learn more about the opportunities agile finance can provide your organization.

Don’t forget to register for the upcoming Art of the Possible event series and learn more about how finance departments can reengineer traditional finance processes to enable true business partnering.

This article original appeared in SAPinsider and is republished by permission.

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Scott Taylor

About Scott Taylor

Scott Taylor is a Partner in the Asia Pacific Advisory Centre leading SAP Finance in the region. Scott has more than 25 years’ experience in the design, development and implementation of Financial Performance Management Solutions. Scott has the unique ability to bridge the gap between Finance and practical technology based solutions that enable companies to achieve their desired commercial outcomes. Scott is a sought after key note speaker at financial solutions and technology conferences and has led many successful Office of the CFO projects worldwide. Scott has experience across many industries including pharmaceuticals, mining, real estate, banking and finance, utilities, manufacturing and consumer goods.

What Is The CFO’s Role In Preventing A Cyber Attack?

Thack Brown

Cybersecurity is a top concern for companies across industries in today’s increasingly data-driven, digital world. From political headlines to email phishing attacks directed at our inboxes, or across a growing number of smart devices, we face a growing challenge in ensuring that data can be protected within our organizations.

Cybersecurity concerns are top-of-mind for all departments across the enterprise, but finance remains one of the most vulnerable areas for malicious attacks. A recent report from Deloitte noted that U.S. financial services companies lost on average $23.6 million from cybersecurity breaches in 2013 – the highest average loss across all industries.

Today, information equates to power, and customer information is not the only data that is at risk. A company’s internal assets, including financial and strategic plans, can also be targets. An attack on this data (either for leakage, manipulation, ransom, or other malicious intent) could endanger a CFO’s relationships and trust with a number of important parties. It could also lead to business disruptions and loss of market share, not to mention potentially hefty fines.

In this environment, how can CFOs and their organizations more broadly implement an effective cybersecurity strategy?

Provide continuous security education. Education should be a key priority for the CFO to make sure that the risk of cyber attacks is understood and potential impacts are addressed, especially when it comes to protecting critical financial planning documents. Beyond IT it is essential that every employee, from line managers to the C-suite, receive training on cybersecurity trends and threats, whether it’s setting up a company-wide training or nominating a cybersecurity subject matter expert whose role is to set overall standards and advise the board. Given the high stakes, understanding a company’s risk is a critical component in fending off a potential breach.

Understand your data and map assets. As the number of breaches continues to grow at a rapid pace, many companies have decided to strictly protect all of their data. Not only does this come with a hefty price tag, but since resources are often limited, it could also mean overlooking some valuable assets. Not all information is critical or confidential. To best prioritize data protection needs, CFOs should work with their finance teams to evaluate which data is critical and rank it appropriately. Once data is evaluated and ranked, it is also important to know where the data lives and how it can be accessed. This might seem like common sense, but a recent EY study found that only 40% of companies hold an accurate inventory of their data ecosystem. In order to truly protect information, CFOs and finance teams need to understand how sensitive information is being accessed in order to get a full picture of potential vulnerabilities.

Evaluate existing risk and resolve vulnerabilities. The CFO is responsible for managing the risk created by or impacting their finance operations, and cybersecurity is no different than any other risk assessment that a CFO needs to perform in order to keep the finance department running smoothly. Applying a root cause approach is very relevant in this case, as it will help find the weakest link, but it is important to not stop at IT impacts. To understand the real exposure of each vulnerability, roll up the risk chain and assess the business, strategic, and also operational impacts resulting from a data breach.

Stay a step ahead. When it comes to cybersecurity, the best defense is a good offense: CFOs should routinely run test scenarios to make sure that protective measures are working and weaknesses in the structure are rectified. While it may not be the best idea to encourage finance teams to attempt to hack their own data, partnering with your IT department and letting the experts run some tests can be a positive exercise. By being proactive, CFOs can deter future breaches before they happen, as well as protect their own personal liability in the event of a breach.

While a company cannot always prevent a breach from occurring, the organization – and finance executives in particular – can take steps to ensure that their organization is best prepared to mitigate an attack and control the impact to the finance function. By educating the workforce from the ground up, taking the time to understand the data at risk, resolving any known vulnerabilities and being proactive, companies can be effective in fending off a potential cyber attack.

This article originally appearing The Huffington Post and is republished by permission.

Follow SAP Finance online: @SAPFinance (Twitter)  | LinkedIn | FacebookYouTube

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Thack Brown

About Thack Brown

Thack Brown is general manager and global head for SAP’s Line of Business Finance. In this capacity, he is responsible for the full suite of SAP solutions for the Office of the CFO.

Is Personalization Killing Your Relationships With Customers?

Christopher Koch

 

Customers Want Personalization…

 

Customers expect a coordinated, personalized response across all channels. For example, 91% expect to pick up where they left off when they switch channels.

Source: “Omni-Channel Service Doesn’t Measure Up; Customers Are Tired of Playing Games” (Aspect Blog, January 29, 2014)

laptop_phone

 


 

… And they Want it Now

 

Customers also want their interactions to be live – or in the moment they choose. For example, nearly 60% of consumers want real-time promotions and 48% like online reminders to order items that they might have run out of.

realtime

That means companies need to become a Live Business – a business that can coordinate multiple functions in order to respond to and even anticipate customer demand at any moment.

Source: “U.S. Consumers Want More Personalized Retail Experience and Control Over Personal Information, Accenture Survey Shows” (Accenture, March 9, 2015)

 


 

But There’s a Catch: Trust

 

73percent

Customers are demanding more intimacy, but there’s only so far companies can go before they cross over the line to creepy. For example, facial-recognition technology that identifies age and gender to target advertisements on digital screens is considered creepy by 73% of people surveyed.

Source: “In-Store Personalization: Creepy or Cool?” (RichRelevance, 2015)

 


 

How to Earn Their Trust and Keep It

 

Here are some ways to improve trust while moving forward with omnichannel personalization.

trustfall

1-01

Customers Want Value for Their Data

An Accenture study found that the majority of consumers in the United States and the United Kingdom are willing to allow trusted retailers to use some of their personal data in order to present personalized and targeted products, services, recommendations, and offers.

Source: “U.S. Consumers Want More Personalized Retail Experience and Control Over Personal Information, Accenture Survey Shows” (Accenture, March 9, 2015)

 

2-01

Don’t Take Data, Let Customers Offer It

Customers who voluntarily provide data are less likely to be annoyed by personalization that’s built around it. Mobile apps are a great way to invite customers to share more data in a relationship that they control.

 

3-01

Be Clear About How You Will Use Data

Companies should think about the customer data transaction – such as what information the customer is giving them, how it’s being used, and what the result will be – and describe it as simply as possible.

 


 

download arrowTo learn more about how to personalize without destroying trust, read the in-depth report Live Businesses Deliver a Personal Customer Experience Without Losing Trust.

 

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Christopher Koch

About Christopher Koch

Christopher Koch is the Editorial Director of the SAP Center for Business Insight. He is an experienced publishing professional, researcher, editor, and writer in business, technology, and B2B marketing. Share your thoughts with Chris on Twitter @Ckochster.

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Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Stephan Gatien

About Stephan Gatien

Stephan Gatien is global head of Telecommunications for SAP. He is responsible for the company's vision and strategy in the telecommunications industry, overseeing product and solution management activities and working with product development teams to ensure that SAP products support the unique needs of telcos.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Andre Smith

About Andre Smith

An Internet, Marketing and E-Commerce specialist with several years of experience in the industry. He has watched as the world of online business has grown and adapted to new technologies, and he has made it his mission to help keep businesses informed and up to date.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Mike Jones

About Mike Jones

Mike Jones is an expert writer dedicated to learn as much as he can about the business world while keeping focus on his main interest: natural healthcare remedies. He shares his conclusions and work here as often as he can.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Michael Brenner

About Michael Brenner

Michael Brenner is a globally-recognized keynote speaker, author of  The Content Formula and the CEO of Marketing Insider GroupHe has worked in leadership positions in sales and marketing for global brands like SAP and Nielsen, as well as for thriving startups. Today, Michael shares his passion on leadership and marketing strategies that deliver customer value and business impact. He is recognized by the Huffington Post as a Top Business Keynote Speaker and   a top  CMO influencer by Forbes.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Adam Winfield

About Adam Winfield

Adam Winfield writes about technology, how it's affecting industries, how it's affecting businesses, and how it's affecting people.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness