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'Big Business' Advantages For Small And Midsize Business Supply Chains

Shelly Dutton

In small and midsize businesses, supply chains can sometimes be more daunting than their much-larger rivals’. The challenges may be the same; but when every customer counts, there is little room for delayed product shipments, lost material orders, and low-quality supplies. Access to high-quality resources at the right time, right place, and right quantity matters to smaller firms. But more important, they must take every opportunity to drive customer satisfaction and loyalty, generate a stable cash flow, and reduce overhead costs.

To create supply chains with “big business” advantages such as cost-efficiency, growth-enablement, and strategic outcomes, small and midsize companies require a forward-thinking mindset and the right tools. The eBook “Ecosystem in Action: SME Customer Success Stories,” recently released by SAP, offers various examples of supply chains that are running like a big business with the agility and nimbleness that only small and midsize firms can deliver. Here are three of those success stories.

CPIC Abahsain Fiberglass: Driving 50% higher operational efficiency

With a workforce of 350 employees, CPIC Abahsain Fiberglass, a joint venture uniting Bahrain-based Abahsain Fiberglass and China-based Chongqing Polycomp International Corporation (CPIC), is fulfilling the high demand for corrosion-resistant fiberglass and glass fiber across the Persian Gulf region. The company has created a business model dependent on high-quality products, proximity to its customers, reliability, and timeliness. However, maintaining this well-earned reputation required a new perspective after Abahsain opened a new state-of-the-art manufacturing facility shortly after its partnership with CPIC was formed.

To operate more efficiently as it significantly increased production output and connectivity with CPIC, Abahsain implemented a foundational enterprise resource planning (ERP) solution system. In short order, CPIC Abahsain Fiberglass enhanced its ability to change and expedite product customizations – leading to 50% greater efficiency, 10% lower operational costs, and higher customer satisfaction. 

Royal Can Industries: Bringing clarity to product costs and driving 5% cost savings

For years, Royal Can Industries has demonstrated mastery in the art of maintaining the lush flavor and nutrients of fruits and vegetables as they are packed in a tin can and shipped to the rest of the world. As a leading packaging can manufacturer in Thailand, the company is the first company of its kind to penetrate the Japanese market – proving its position as the industry’s primary innovator.

When demand and revenue surged, Royal Can Industries’ siloed platform made it difficult to support informed decision making. After implementing an ERP application, all levels of the firm gained an uninterrupted flow of business-critical information and detailed visibility into costs by product and process. With greater transparency and a clear vision, Royal Can Industries decreased its costs by five percent while consistently innovating attractive and convenient packaging designs for consumers.

3F Industries: Responding to dynamic market conditions

3F Industries is playing a vital role in millions of households, bakeries, and confectionery manufacturers – providing vegetable fat products and edible oils that make food healthier, tastier, and longer lasting. To stay competitive in a highly dynamic market that varies from one location to another, 3F must customize its offerings quickly with a high level of flexibility and accuracy.

An ERP software system running on an in-memory computing platform has brought tremendous advantages to 3F’s production operations. The company can now respond quickly to changing market conditions by tailoring daily price changes and schemes to align with different products and locations. Plus, digitalization of quality management activities is ensuring consistent control over product quality across the entire value chain – from procurement to sales – to safeguard the hard-earned trust of its consumers and customers.

Bring “big business” advantage to your supply chain. Learn from the stories of 90 small and midsize firms that are embracing their own digital transformation.

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Supply Chain Leaders Boost Value With Digital Transformation

Dr. Achim Krüger

If you shop at REI and the particular store you’re at does not have the size or color of the item you want, an employee can quickly and accurately see where the closest item is located.

Thanks to the effective digitalization of the company’s supply chain processes, REI is a leader in inventory visibility across its stores and distribution centers. The right applications enable it to provide outstanding service, achieve extraordinary customer satisfaction scores, and increase revenue.

Walking the knife’s edge

But how do you find a roadmap for digital transformation that fits your organization’s specific strategy?

Like many leaders across industries, supply chain executives often feel like they’re walking a technological knife’s edge. On one hand, they want to avoid over-investing in every shiny new solution. At the same time, they don’t want to fall behind and dismiss a critical trend.

SCM World has collected data since 2014 on strategic disruption created by new technologies, and one trend is clear: The relevance of the digital shift is huge and still rising, and the pace of change is too fast to wait and see what happens.

When asked in a survey which technologies are “disruptive and important” to supply chain strategy, responses have changed dramatically in just a couple short years:

  • 3D printing has doubled, from 20% to 40%
  • Drones and self-guided vehicles have tripled, from 11% to 35%
  • Big Data analytics leads the pack, from 64% in 2014 to 81% in 2016

Innovating the way business has been done for decades

Not surprisingly, years of new technological advances have created faster and more standardized business processes. The emerging digital supply chain is lighter and more agile, and these three business model disruptions show the impact of digital operations on strategy:

  1. Omnichannel leadership: Omnichannel leadership is about recognizing that consumer demand is only partially represented in retail point-of-sale data. True demand includes usage behavior, replenishment patterns, and lifestyle impact. REI thrives in this model because its stores are only a small part of the total demand sense and supply response system the company uses to serve customers.
  1. Personalization of products and services: According to an SCM World survey, 90% of supply chain professionals agree that customers value personalized products. Data also shows a steady rise in the number of companies whose operations are supporting “much larger SKU assortments” in response to digital demand, up 60% overall in just three years.
  1. Lean, green, and precise manufacturing: The other major business model disruption arising from digital is a shift toward resource-efficient and increasingly localized manufacturing. IoT-enabled equipment can optimize energy, water, and material use, and combined with smaller, cheaper collaborative robots, this equipment makes local-for-local manufacturing a real possibility.

Creating real value for your company

Even as business models shift, new technology is meaningless if it doesn’t create real value for your company. Across all industries, enterprises need to use innovative thinking to reimagine how digital supply chains can improve business strategy and transform business models.

How do companies focus their efforts, and which ones are already leading the way?

  • Focus on service to the end customer: Digital supply chains can use the power of the Internet of Things (IoT) to get products delivered to consumers faster, cheaper, and in a more personalized way than before.
  • Urban Outfitters: The retailer’s pick-from-shelf omnichannel capabilities added $9 million additional revenue in a single quarter.
  • Hilti: A maker of high-performance hand tools for construction work, Hilti has developed a comprehensive omnichannel system whose asset tracking uses smart supply chain to keep real-time information on where every tool is, allowing the company to sell more and respond to different levels of time sensitivity.
  • Focus on warehouse automation and delivery: Digitalization in delivery is also creating value in warehouse management.
  • Amazon: The retail giant uses sophisticated analytics in its fulfillment centers to optimize space utilization, minimize time to find and pick items, and shorten order-to-delivery cycle times.
  • Kiva Robots: This system, which runs the fulfilment operations for Zappos, moves items to packing stations rather than making people move around the warehouse, saving time and money and increasing item density per square foot of building space.
  • Focus on efficiency and agility: Digitalization in production improves process monitoring, control, and execution to make smaller batches of production economically.
  • Harley Davidson: The company transformed its Pennsylvania motorcycle plant from an old-school assembly line to a single-flow digital line that makes unique models one at a time. This agile manufacturing approach cut costs by 7%, increased productivity by 2.4%, and increased net margins by 19%.
  • BMW: Known for its effective manufacturing process, BMW uses smart robotics, planning, and 3D simulation software to sell custom configured automobiles at prices competitive with mass production.
  • Focus on resource optimization: Digital transformation helps reduce the cost of maintaining long-lived assets. Sensors on equipment monitor temperature, friction, and pressure to allow operators to maintain peak performance with much less work and spare parts inventory. Same time the performance of the asset system can be linked to business outcomes, influencing revenue and margin.
  • Trenitalia: The primary train operator in Italy created a smart asset management strategy that takes 5,000 signals per second from hundreds of sensors embedded in the train’s hardware and feeds them in real time into a reporting and analytics database to allow precision maintenance. The company expects to reduce maintenance spending by 8% to 10% per year, cut invested capital by 6.5%, and eliminate 10–20 million euros of penalty payments for service failures.

Across industries, the digitalization of processes and operations is changing what’s possible for supply chain practitioners. Download the full report, Smart Operations and the Internet of Things: Digital Impacts on Business Strategy, to learn more about how to offer customers a more personalized experience, where and how they want it, with less money and fewer resources spent along the way.

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Dr. Achim Krüger

About Dr. Achim Krüger

Dr. Achim Krüger is Vice President of Operational Excellence (EAM and EH&S) at SAP. After starting his career as an officer with the German Air Force, he held several positions in the areas of maintenance of helicopters and transport aircraft as well as systems engineering, before he worked in higher commands as a logistics general staff officer. Joining SAP in 2002, Dr. Krüger first served as a consultant before establishing the SAP for Defense & Security industry portfolio and later assumed several other duties in Solution Management and Development,

Digitalization Turns Supply Chains Inside Out – And This Is Just The Beginning

Dr. Ravi Prakash Mathur

For generations, developments in manufacturing and IT have pushed the productivity frontier to a new level. Technology delivers not only new concepts and approaches, but also improved operational effectiveness and advanced supply chain management that open the way to a distinct, competitive advantage.

If we take a moment to examine the illustrious history of modern-day manufacturing, it becomes apparent that technology continues to push the boundaries of the impossible.

Supply chains in the 20th century

The 20th century saw giant leaps in operations and supply chain efficiencies driven by significant technology innovation. At the forefront of the revolution was the automotive industry, where manufacturing shifted from craft manufacturing to assembly-line or unit-flow manufacturing. Over time, manufacturing systems became large in scale, making the planning processes that supported them increasingly complex.

Multiple products, plants, markets, and suppliers became part of the system, requiring material planning systems that could handle a web-like network of supply chain nodes. Computing advancements led to applications that improved supply chain planning for large manufacturers in terms of material requisition and production plans. At the same time, programs – such as continuous improvement, lean management, Six Sigma, quality management – were pursued to improve production efficiency.

Supply chains in the 21st century

At this stage, as all competitors started adopting best practices, the maximum value a company could hope to deliver at a given cost, technology, and skill set began to diminish. As more organizations reached the productivity frontier, which can be defined as the sum of all existing best practices, profitability started to erode.

The other challenge was that the supply chain was no longer defined as a chain of linear relationships. Value chains gave way to value networks. Outsourced business processes – including those pertaining to manufacturing, R&D, logistics, and marketing – and the emergence of digital platforms were the primary factors that led to this change.

Supply chain network mapping became more complex and posed a further challenge in supply chain optimization. While some organizations adopted replenishment-driven, pull-based supply systems such as those based on a theory of constraints, others chose the forecasting method. Such innovative thinking paved the way for hybrid supply chain systems, which combine push- and pull-based systems and embrace multiple push-pull boundaries.

Supply chains today

As organizations use digital platforms to create new business models, the supply value chain is getting reconfigured and realigned to unlock even greater value. There’s no doubt that digital value nets are more customer-aligned, collaborative, agile, scalable, and fast-flowing. But they do come with their fair share of challenges.

Consider the rise of the e-commerce site. By building in data aggregation and analytics, manufacturers are empowered to predict demand and optimize demand and supply. In addition, increasing use of e-wallets and payment banks have taken the payment process out of a linear value chain and placed it firmly on a digital platform that supports various portals.

Another example is that of furniture being sold through Web portals. Furniture bought online is shipped in knocked-down condition and assembled in the customer’s home. Effectively, the manufacturing plant, which was traditionally upstream in the supply chain, has moved to the customer’s home.

Supply chains in the future

There’s little doubt that organizational boundaries are dynamically changing. The future of the supply chain will be more collaborative, complex, and dynamic – all of which will require more agile processes.

This is a significant challenge for IT systems that support such operations. Conventional IT solutions that worked well for linear supply chains will need to evolve further to provide greater efficiency throughout the supply chain. More important, such advancement will need to push the productivity frontier to help manufacturers gain a new competitive advantage.

For more insight on modern supply chains, see Live Business: Creating Digital Supply Networks.

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Dr. Ravi Prakash Mathur

About Dr. Ravi Prakash Mathur

Dr. Ravi Prakash Mathur is Senior Director of Supply Chain Management (SCM) and Head of Logistics and Central Planning at Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories Ltd. He heads the global logistics, central planning, and central sourcing for the pharmaceutical organization. Winner of the 2015 Top 25 Digitalist Thought Leaders of India award from SAP, Dr. Mathur is an author, coach, and supply chain professional with 23 years of experience and is based in Hyderabad. He is also actively involved in academic activities and is an internal trainer for DRL for negotiation skills and SCM. In 2014, he co-authored the book “Quality Assurance in Pharmaceuticals & Operations Management and Industrial Safety” for Dr. B. R. Ambedkar University, Hyderabad. He is also member of The Departmental Visiting Committee (DVC) for Department of Biotechnology, Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology (MNNIT) Allahabad. Professional recognitions include a citation from World Bank and International Finance Corporation for his contribution to their publication “Doing Business in 2006” and the winner of the Logistics-Week Young Achiever in Supply Chain Award for 2012.

Is Personalization Killing Your Relationships With Customers?

Christopher Koch

 

Customers Want Personalization…

 

Customers expect a coordinated, personalized response across all channels. For example, 91% expect to pick up where they left off when they switch channels.

Source: “Omni-Channel Service Doesn’t Measure Up; Customers Are Tired of Playing Games” (Aspect Blog, January 29, 2014)

laptop_phone

 


 

… And they Want it Now

 

Customers also want their interactions to be live – or in the moment they choose. For example, nearly 60% of consumers want real-time promotions and 48% like online reminders to order items that they might have run out of.

realtime

That means companies need to become a Live Business – a business that can coordinate multiple functions in order to respond to and even anticipate customer demand at any moment.

Source: “U.S. Consumers Want More Personalized Retail Experience and Control Over Personal Information, Accenture Survey Shows” (Accenture, March 9, 2015)

 


 

But There’s a Catch: Trust

 

73percent

Customers are demanding more intimacy, but there’s only so far companies can go before they cross over the line to creepy. For example, facial-recognition technology that identifies age and gender to target advertisements on digital screens is considered creepy by 73% of people surveyed.

Source: “In-Store Personalization: Creepy or Cool?” (RichRelevance, 2015)

 


 

How to Earn Their Trust and Keep It

 

Here are some ways to improve trust while moving forward with omnichannel personalization.

trustfall

1-01

Customers Want Value for Their Data

An Accenture study found that the majority of consumers in the United States and the United Kingdom are willing to allow trusted retailers to use some of their personal data in order to present personalized and targeted products, services, recommendations, and offers.

Source: “U.S. Consumers Want More Personalized Retail Experience and Control Over Personal Information, Accenture Survey Shows” (Accenture, March 9, 2015)

 

2-01

Don’t Take Data, Let Customers Offer It

Customers who voluntarily provide data are less likely to be annoyed by personalization that’s built around it. Mobile apps are a great way to invite customers to share more data in a relationship that they control.

 

3-01

Be Clear About How You Will Use Data

Companies should think about the customer data transaction – such as what information the customer is giving them, how it’s being used, and what the result will be – and describe it as simply as possible.

 


 

download arrowTo learn more about how to personalize without destroying trust, read the in-depth report Live Businesses Deliver a Personal Customer Experience Without Losing Trust.

 

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About Christopher Koch

Christopher Koch is the Editorial Director of the SAP Center for Business Insight. He is an experienced publishing professional, researcher, editor, and writer in business, technology, and B2B marketing. Share your thoughts with Chris on Twitter @Ckochster.

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Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Dr. Achim Krüger

About Dr. Achim Krüger

Dr. Achim Krüger is Vice President of Operational Excellence (EAM and EH&S) at SAP. After starting his career as an officer with the German Air Force, he held several positions in the areas of maintenance of helicopters and transport aircraft as well as systems engineering, before he worked in higher commands as a logistics general staff officer. Joining SAP in 2002, Dr. Krüger first served as a consultant before establishing the SAP for Defense & Security industry portfolio and later assumed several other duties in Solution Management and Development,

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Marcell Vollmer

About Marcell Vollmer

Marcell Vollmer is the Chief Digital Officer for SAP Ariba (SAP). He is responsible for helping customers digitalize their supply chain. Prior to this role, Marcell was the Chief Operating Officer for SAP Ariba, enabling the company to setup a startup within the larger SAP business. He was also the Chief Procurement Officer at SAP SE, where he transformed the global procurement organization towards a strategic, end-to-end driven organization, which runs SAP Ariba and SAP Fieldglass solutions, as well as Concur technologies in the cloud. Marcell has more than 20 years of experience in working in international companies, starting with DHL where he delivered multiple supply chain optimization projects.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Nic Smith

About Nic Smith

Nic Smith leads the global product marketing organization for business intelligence and cloud analytics at SAP. As a data-driven marketing leader, his experience in enterprise and business consumer marketing strategies supports customer innovation and consistently drives growth targets. Nic brings a unique blend of experience in product marketing, field marketing, product management, digital marketing, and customer experience with a proven record of leading great teams and initiatives for companies such as SAP, Microsoft, and Business Objects.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Jayne Landry

About Jayne Landry

Jayne Landry is the global vice president and general manager for Business Intelligence at SAP. Ms. Landry joined Crystal Decisions in 2002 and came into SAP through the Business Objects acquisition in 2007. A seasoned executive with 20+ years of experience in the technology sector, Jayne has held leadership roles in high-tech companies in the CRM, mobility, and cloud applications space. Ms. Landry holds a Bachelor of Commerce degree from the University of Auckland, and has continued executive development with Queen’s University, Ontario, and through work with the Sauder School of Business at the University of British Columbia.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Roger Noia

About Roger Noia

Roger Noia is the director of Solution Marketing, SAP Jam Collaboration, at SAP. He is responsible for product marketing and sales enablement for our dedicated sales team as well as the broader SAP sales force selling SAP Jam.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Stephen Cloughley

About Stephen Cloughley

As part of the global Life Sciences Business Unit at SAP, Stephen Cloughley drives supply chain solutions with a special focus on serialization in the wholesales, consumer, and pharmaceutical industries. Stephen is a chemical engineer from University College Dublin and has over 20 years experience in the software industry in Europe, South Africa, and the United States.   

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Dr. Ravi Prakash Mathur

About Dr. Ravi Prakash Mathur

Dr. Ravi Prakash Mathur is Senior Director of Supply Chain Management (SCM) and Head of Logistics and Central Planning at Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories Ltd. He heads the global logistics, central planning, and central sourcing for the pharmaceutical organization. Winner of the 2015 Top 25 Digitalist Thought Leaders of India award from SAP, Dr. Mathur is an author, coach, and supply chain professional with 23 years of experience and is based in Hyderabad. He is also actively involved in academic activities and is an internal trainer for DRL for negotiation skills and SCM. In 2014, he co-authored the book “Quality Assurance in Pharmaceuticals & Operations Management and Industrial Safety” for Dr. B. R. Ambedkar University, Hyderabad. He is also member of The Departmental Visiting Committee (DVC) for Department of Biotechnology, Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology (MNNIT) Allahabad. Professional recognitions include a citation from World Bank and International Finance Corporation for his contribution to their publication “Doing Business in 2006” and the winner of the Logistics-Week Young Achiever in Supply Chain Award for 2012.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

About Michael Brenner

Michael Brenner is a globally-recognized keynote speaker, author of  The Content Formula and the CEO of Marketing Insider GroupHe has worked in leadership positions in sales and marketing for global brands like SAP and Nielsen, as well as for thriving startups. Today, Michael shares his passion on leadership and marketing strategies that deliver customer value and business impact. He is recognized by the Huffington Post as a Top Business Keynote Speaker and   a top  CMO influencer by Forbes.

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awareness