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Top Six Ways To Modernize The Supply Chain

Marcell Vollmer

When was the last time you encountered a supply chain professional or colleague who didn’t have a smartphone or social media account?

Like the rest of the world, procurement has gone digital. According to a survey conducted by Oxford Economics, the function is undergoing a radical modernization, leveraging technology to improve processes and transform the way work gets done.

Today’s supply chain professionals are part of an “always-on” culture. And they need to be empowered with technology and insights that enable them keep pace. To discover, connect, and collaborate with their trading partners and peers across the street and around the globe. To work anywhere, anytime from any device. To create new value that spans the enterprise.

How can you enable this within your organization?

1.  Rethink the process

Supply chain management isn’t a set of discreet tasks performed in silos, but a connected one carried out across many functions and geographies. And the key to executing it well is in linking multiple parties and systems using a common platform that supports the entire source-to-settle process and provides a gateway for collaboration both within and beyond the enterprise on a global scale. Networks are a great way to do this.

2. Get connected

Every day, billions of consumers around the world use social networks to manage their personal connections. To shop, share and consume. Why? Because they make things easy. The same is true of business networks, which provide an equally easy and consumer-like way for companies to manage their trading relationships and commerce activities.

With a few clicks, you can shop for the goods and services you need to run your business, order and have them shipped. When it comes to payments, you can kill the paper checks and transfer the funds electronically. Or you can review your receivables and decide whether you want to offer a discount in return for early payment.

You can view and manage your spend across all major categories and find opportunities for savings. You can manage your entire workforce –temporary and full-time employees alike –and empower them to do their jobs anywhere, anytime from any device. And you can engage your customers across multiple channels and create personalized experiences along every step of their journey that delight and keep them loyal.

So get connected.

3. Don’t just automate, innovate

Digitization is the first step most companies take to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their supply chain operations. And while it’s a good start, automating processes such as procurement, orders, invoicing, and payment doesn’t in and of itself create value. Where the real value of digitization lies is in enabling new processes that drive more collaborative, intelligent, and transparent ways of operating. Processes like dynamic discounting that allow buyers to secure discounts that can be reinvested in research and development or sellers to lock in funding to expand their business. Or contingent workforce management through which companies can identify and manage highly specialized resources needed to develop that next-generation product and open new revenue streams.

Such processes can change the game. And networks make them possible by providing a common platform from which all parties can in connect and collaborate – regardless of the back-end systems they may be using.

4. Work smarter

Like their social counterparts, business networks house incredible amounts of insights and data that can be used to learn in context and act in smarter ways. You can, for instance, access performance ratings on potential trading partners along with recommendations from the community to determine who to do business with or detect risk in your supply chain. You can combine in-the-moment purchasing data with historic trends to predict stock outs before they happen and direct replenishment. Or gain real-time insights into invoice approval status to more efficiently manage your cash. Engage in these communities and unleash the power of this information to optimize your supply chain decisions and accelerate innovation and growth.

5. Run Simple

Complexity is the enemy of business. Every year, it costs the 200 biggest companies in the world an estimated $237 billion. That’s ten percent of profits buried under a mountain of waste, inefficiency, and missed opportunity. Digitization can remove this complexity by enabling new, more efficient processes that allow you – and your supply chain – to run more simply than ever.

6. Get moving

In today’s economy, digitization is the on-ramp to innovation and success. With the right strategy and solutions to support it, you can transform your supply chain and create entirely new levels of value for your organization.

So get on the highway and go fast. Or your competition may pass you.

To learn more about how to modernize your supply chain through digitization, download “Collaborating with Direct Materials Suppliers Across Your Global Extended Supply Chain.”

This article first appeared on Supply Chain Digital.

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Marcell Vollmer

About Marcell Vollmer

Marcell Vollmer is the Chief Digital Officer for SAP Ariba (SAP). He is responsible for helping customers digitalize their supply chain. Prior to this role, Marcell was the Chief Operating Officer for SAP Ariba, enabling the company to setup a startup within the larger SAP business. He was also the Chief Procurement Officer at SAP SE, where he transformed the global procurement organization towards a strategic, end-to-end driven organization, which runs SAP Ariba and SAP Fieldglass solutions, as well as Concur technologies in the cloud. Marcell has more than 20 years of experience in working in international companies, starting with DHL where he delivered multiple supply chain optimization projects.

5 Supply Chain And Digital Economy Myths Debunked

Richard Howells

The digital economy is presenting businesses with myriad opportunities. But to capitalize on these prospects, companies must be willing to adapt, particularly in regard to how they manage their existing supply chain operations.

While people are finally beginning to recognize the potential benefits that come with the digital economy, too few companies are digitizing their operations in an effort to thrive in this dynamic environment. In fact, according to SAP research, 71% of organizations consider their digital maturity levels to be in the “early” or “developing” stages.

Given that fact, it’s entirely possible that people still don’t fully grasp the importance of transforming their existing business models and processes to succeed in today’s digital economy.

Below are five statements related to the digital economy and supply chain that many people believe to be true – and an explanation on why they are, indeed, false.

Myth #1: Your existing supply chain is sufficient to help you thrive in the digital economy

“To win in the digital economy,” says Hans Thalbauer, senior vice president of extended supply chain at SAP, “we have to reimagine how we design, plan, make, deliver, and operate our products and assets.”

Companies must put themselves in a position to develop environments in which they can access and manage data and processes in real time. This requires transforming your traditional supply chain into a digitized, extended supply chain, one that enables your business to be more connected, intelligent, responsive, and predictive.

By reimagining your existing supply chain, you can deliver superior customer experiences and increase revenue. In fact, companies that adapt to the digital world are 26% more profitable than their industry peers, according to MIT Sloan research.

Myth #2: Customers aren’t willing to pay for better experiences

Today’s customers crave a new type of experience. Omnichannel solutions can provide this, enabling buyers to discover a product online, research it on a mobile device, and purchase it in a retail store.

Given that these capabilities exist, your company needs to ensure it can deliver on the omnichannel fulfillment promise. To achieve this, the different channels must be able to support the development and/or delivery of goods, based on each individual customer’s preferences.

Customers are so eager for a better purchasing experience, 86% of them are willing to pay more money to get it, according to a 2014 American Express and Ebiquity survey.

By reimagining your existing supply chain and transforming it into a digitized, extended supply chain, you can gain the real-time insight you need to enable customer-centric processes and truly satisfy your buyers.

Myth #3: Customers love mass-produced products

Each and every one of your customers is wholly unique. So it’s no surprise that buyers are increasingly seeking out products that are customized to their individual preferences and needs.

Forty-two percent of consumers are interested in technology to customize and personalize products, and 19% are willing to pay a 10% price premium to individualize products, according to a Deloitte research study.

This growing demand for product customization is challenging companies considerably. Traditionally, supply chain organizations merely had to manufacture and/or ship full pallets of identical goods. Now, they’re tasked with delivering a lot size of one.

To support your customers’ growing desire for individualized products, your business must transform how it designs, produces, and delivers goods and services. It must embrace the latest technologies, harnessing the power of the Internet of Things (IoT), 3D printing, and other cutting-edge innovations.

By adopting a digital supply chain and smart manufacturing techniques, you can enable greater connectivity, responsiveness, agility, and reliability, empowering you to better meet your customers’ demands for individualized products.

Myth #4: Businesses can’t benefit from the sharing economy

The sharing economy revolves around the sharing of human and physical resources. Generally, consumers love it. Businesses, on the other hand, view it with great skepticism, wondering how it can actually benefit their companies.

At the heart of the sharing economy lies connectivity. When everything is connected, you can collaborate like never before.

Through the sharing economy, you can better link your organization with manufacturers, logistics service providers, and other partners. This larger business network enables companies to capitalize on their partners’ resources, expand their reach, innovate, and improve customer service.

Taking full advantage of a connected enterprise of companies requires putting an extended supply chain at the core of your operations. This allows you to have greater visibility into various customer, supplier, manufacturer, and other insights, ensuring you can improve decision making and respond to in-the-moment changes and demands.

Networked businesses, according to McKinsey & Company, are 50% more likely than their peers to be market leaders.

Myth #5: You simply cannot overcome resource scarcity

Resources are declining globally. Raw materials such as water, minerals, oil, and gas are becoming increasingly difficult to obtain. Human talent is also growing scarcer, as employees lack the requisite skills to manage the data that comes with running digitized, extended supply chains.

Today’s organizations need to begin building sustainability into their business processes. From a talent perspective, companies can achieve this a number of ways, from deploying a contingent labor force to replacing certain roles with robotics. To combat resource scarcity, manufacturers must start doing more with less, leveraging alternate sources of energy and reused or recycled materials.

Finally, another key to ensuring your organization is run in a sustainable manner is to emphasize safety and risk management. Protecting your staff from harm and your resources from damage go hand in hand with your company’s long-term success.

The truth about prospering in today’s complex digital economy

Now that you’ve read a few myths about the digital economy and supply chain, here’s an undeniable truth: Digital transformation is the only tried-and-true way to survive and thrive in today’s dynamic new environment.

Whether providing a superior customer experience, delivering the individualized products your buyers yearn for, or overcoming resource scarcity, only digitization can ensure you possess the capabilities necessary to realize your greatest business goals.

Download this free white paper, Digitizing the Extended Supply Chain, to further explore how your enterprise can combat complexity and accelerate growth in today’s complex digital economy.

This blog was originally published on SCW Magazine

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Richard Howells

About Richard Howells

Richard Howells is a Vice President at SAP responsible for the positioning, messaging, AR , PR and go-to market activities for the SAP Supply Chain solutions.

Lenovo’s “Disciplined” Supply Chain Drives Global Leadership

John Ward

“Lenovo’s been the number one PC company for over three years now,” says Gerry Smith, an executive vice president at Lenovo and president of its Data Center Group, in a recent video.

In fact, Lenovo’s 2015 PC sales represented about 20% of total market share according to Gartner.

That’s a pretty remarkable accomplishment for a company that The Wall Street Journal, described, “as recently as 2005… was a little-known computer maker that sold only in China.”

But a lot has changed in the past 10 years or so – especially in Lenovo’s now worldwide supply chain.

These days, Lenovo has operations in 60 countries, customers around the planet, and it relies on a revamped supply chain driven by such thoroughly modern imperatives as sustainability, product security, real-time planning, and customer-centricity.

Major acquisitions deliver global growth

Lenovo’s dramatic growth has made headlines. In 2005, the company bought IBM’s personal computer business. Then, in 2014 came the acquisitions of both IBM’s Intel-based server business and Motorola Mobility.

And as a result of such bold moves, Lenovo has had to adapt to an increasingly global marketplace and a growing list of international standards and regulations.

As part of an integrated response to its full-scale globalization, Lenovo has established comprehensive sustainability programs across its broad supply chain. These initiatives address operations from internal manufacturing to packaging and logistics. Still other programs help Lenovo evaluate external suppliers on criteria such as employee working conditions, environmental footprint, and the use of environmentally preferred materials. In total, Lenovo reports that it uses more than 25 key indicators to measure vendor transparency, commitment, and performance.

“Working with trusted suppliers – as well as owning and running our own factories – promotes end-to-end security in Lenovo’s supply chain,” says Smith. “These controls help us ensure that products are built with components from known suppliers, guard against hijacking, and protect against compromised firmware updates once our products are deployed.”

Process efficiency is part of the plan

Lenovo’s global supply chain strategy also employs solutions designed to optimize process efficiency. For example, Lenovo implemented an advanced planning and optimization component on an in-memory computing platform to help plan and execute supply chain processes for the newly acquired server business. Additionally, the company partnered  co-developed new applications that support supplier collaboration and help to perform cost forecasting calculations in near real-time.

“We’ve dramatically improved our supply chain performance,” says Smith, “reducing our planning time from 10 hours to 10 minutes.”

As Smith sees it, Lenovo has all the tools in place “to make our supply chain, not only the best PC and server supply chain in the world, but one of the best supply chains across all industries.”

Others obviously agree with Smith’s assessment.

Gartner named Lenovo among its top 25 supply chain companies for 2016. In particular, Gartner cites the high-tech company for the “disciplined approach” it took to integrate its supply chain in the wake of recent acquisitions.

Gartner also notes that Lenovo’s supply chain team ran specific programs to enhance customer experience and operational excellence – like the creation of a customer social/digital platform for key global accounts that presents content tailored to each customer’s preference in terms of order status, new product information, and technical support information. Further, Gartner highlights the fact that Lenovo assigns a supply chain staff member as an executive sponsor for each major account.

A lot has changed since Lenovo was a little-known computer maker that sold only in China.

Please follow me on Twitter at @JohnGWard3.

  • Hear more from Lenovo’s Gerry Smith in this SAP video.
  • Read more about how Lenovo is optimizing supply chain efficiency in this SAP Business Transformation Study.

This story originally appeared on Business Trends on the SAP Community.

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3 Ways Robots Will Co-Evolve with Humans

Christopher Koch

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Christopher Koch

About Christopher Koch

Christopher Koch is the Editorial Director of the SAP Center for Business Insight. He is an experienced publishing professional, researcher, editor, and writer in business, technology, and B2B marketing. Share your thoughts with Chris on Twitter @Ckochster.

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Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Adam Winfield

About Adam Winfield

Adam Winfield writes about technology, how it's affecting industries, how it's affecting businesses, and how it's affecting people.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Gavin Mooney

About Gavin Mooney

Gavin Mooney is a utilities industry solution specialist for SAP. From a background in Engineering and IT, Gavin has been working in the utilities industry with SAP products for nearly 15 years. He has had the privilege of working with a number of Electricity, Gas and Water Utilities across the globe to implement SAP’s Industry Solution for Utilities. He now works with utilities to help them identify the best way to run simple and run better with SAP's latest products. Gavin loves to network and build lasting business relationships and is passionate about cleantech and the fundamental transformation currently shaking up the utilities industry.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Kris Hansen

About Kris Hansen

Kris Hansen is senior principal, Financial Services for SAP Canada. He is focused on understanding the financial services industry and identifying new and interesting digital opportunities that create disruptive business value.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Wilson Zhu

About Wilson Zhu

Wilson Zhu is a Marketing Manager at SAP. He focuses on the topic of Digital Supply Chain and IoT. Follow him on Twitter: @thezhu.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Roger Noia

About Roger Noia

Roger Noia is the director of Solution Marketing, SAP Jam Collaboration, at SAP. He is responsible for product marketing and sales enablement for our dedicated sales team as well as the broader SAP sales force selling SAP Jam.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Drew Schiller

About Drew Schiller

Drew Schiller co-founded and serves as the Chief Executive Officer of Validic, the leading digital health platform for connecting patient-generated data from apps, wearables, and in-home medical devices to the healthcare system. At Validic, Drew leads the corporate strategy, drives key day-to-day initiatives, and works closely with senior executives at partner organizations to stay ahead of the innovation curve.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Carolyn Beal

About Carolyn Beal

Carolyn Beal is senior director of Solution Marketing for Social Software at SAP. Her specialties include product marketing, marketing communications, CRM, and demand generation.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

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Jayne Landry

About Jayne Landry

Jayne Landry is the global vice president and general manager for Business Intelligence at SAP. Ms. Landry joined Crystal Decisions in 2002 and came into SAP through the Business Objects acquisition in 2007. A seasoned executive with 20+ years of experience in the technology sector, Jayne has held leadership roles in high-tech companies in the CRM, mobility, and cloud applications space. Ms. Landry holds a Bachelor of Commerce degree from the University of Auckland, and has continued executive development with Queen’s University, Ontario, and through work with the Sauder School of Business at the University of British Columbia.

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awareness