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Dirt Meets Data: How Early Innovators in Agribusiness Are Feeding the World

Bill Hamilton

The United Nations predicts that the world population will approach 10 billion by the middle of the century. To feed everyone, we must double the amount of food we currently produce. But the challenge of feeding everyone is not just a production issue. It’s also a distribution and need issue. Even a modest demand increase for protein, for example, can strain land resources, reports the United Nations News Centre, underscoring the need for increased efficiency to meet global needs. Digitization in the agribusiness sector increases the ability to feed the rapidly growing world. Companies including Land O’Lakes, Nestle, and Monsanto are leading the way by reimagining agribusiness models and proactively evolving to meet the world’s changing demands.

Land O’Lakes and GEOSYS: How satellite-gathered crop data is changing agriculture

The complexity of agricultural production is one of its greatest challenges. Every decision affects the next. As an added challenge, by the time an issue is actually visible in the field, it’s often too late to change course: the damage is done. Agriculture is the world’s greatest balancing act. While a traditional prescription may give growers a solid start, the ability to continuously monitor fields via technology solutions empowers growers to make decisions that optimize productivity. Growers can stay one step ahead by “seeing” what the human eye cannot detect.

To better address this challenge, Land O’Lakes acquired GEOSYS, an innovative company that uses satellite-based remote sensing to provide current, actionable data. GEOSYS also draws on historical records throughout the growing season and this data combines with real-time observations. Rather than a “one and done” evaluation of a field, GEOSYS empowers growers through continuous monitoring to optimize productivity along the entire agriculture value chain.

Cargill develops software to guide crop production from farm to fork

Severe weather patterns – from floods to heat waves – are wreaking havoc on crop production, costing farmers millions – and a simple Farmer’s Almanac is insufficient for predicting these changing patterns. What if technology could predict these changes and help farmers avoid crop catastrophe?

Like the Land O’Lakes/GEOSYS partnership, Cargill is also developing its own software service to help guide farmers on crop production and putting its own spin on “prescriptive planting.” The software service offers guidance to farmers on the best timing to plant crops, maximizing farm output. The tool, called NextField DataR, crunches a number of different data pieces, such as soil content, seed type, and temperature fluctuations, to help farmers determine the optimal time for crop planting. The result: farmers have more detailed data about optimal planting times, reducing the risk for crop loss in smallholder farming.

Monsanto, Precision Planting, and Climate Corporation: Empowering agriculture through Big Data

While Monsanto has a reputation for being a business built on chemicals, seeds, and genetic traits, the company is rapidly expanding its data science services, reports Reuters. Monsanto acquired Precision Planting, a manufacturer of precision equipment, and Climate Corporation, a provider of super-local weather information. Monsanto’s expansion shows it is serious about precision farming and has now transformed from a seed business to a data science organization, providing the “glue that holds the pieces together.”

Nestle builds lean upstream supply chains from farm to factory via Farmer Connect

Nearly half of all Nestle factories (46%) are located in emerging countries, and 74% of those factories are located in rural areas. Nestle faces a unique challenge: how to locally source raw materials (like milk, grains, and cocoa) while ensuring responsible farming, production, and consumption practices. Nestle’s solution: the Farmer Connect program.

Nestle is not only buying from rural farmers, but is also investing in farmer training to secure a sustainable and high-quality supply of commodities, such as specialty coffee, and improve food traceability. Nestle’s Farmer Connect program is designed to ensure long-term supply of safe, quality-assured, and regulatory-compliant agricultural materials to consumers that also comply with responsible farming practices. In Western Africa, for example, Nestle partnered with the International Institute for Tropical Agriculture to train 10,000 farmers on good agriculture and storage practices. Farmers now meet Nestle quality production standards and achieve a price premium on their goods. The farmers benefit from expanded market access for locally produced grains in Western Africa, and Nestle benefits from replicable and consistent quality and food safety via sustainable production.

John Deere: Fleet telemetrics empower remote equipment management

Still think of John Deere as just a tractor company? Think again: John Deere has 2,600 employees that come to work every morning just to develop software solutions to optimize John Deere fleet performance. John Deere is providing fleet telematics solutions that make it easier for farmers to remotely manage their equipment and analyze sensor data in real-time.

JDLinks is John Deere’s telemetrics system that remotely connects all make/model machines in the field with mobile devices. Farmers can keep track of their fleet, monitor work progress, analyze performance, and perform remote operator support and automated data exchange. John Deere also offers a new FarmSite service package that increases machine uptime by utilizing remote dealer service capabilities including CAN-data tracking, diagnostics, software updates, and operator support. John Deere is also a leader in predictive maintenance, integrating sensor data, business data, and environmental data to proactively manage equipment-servicing needs and reduce downtime.

What’s next for digital farming

For farmers and food manufacturers alike, the road map to relevance requires reimagining agribusiness models and proactively evolving. Increased hyperconnectivity is allowing farmers from Western Africa to the United States to improve crop productivity, food safety, and sustainability practices. Improving vertical integration along the agricultural value chain means that industry boundaries are blurring. As agribusinesses reimagine their business models, business processes, and work, they must engage with new partners as technology continues to drive collaborative value.

Learn more about Digital Transformation for the Agribusiness.

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Bill Hamilton

About Bill Hamilton

Bill Hamilton is a director in the Industry Cloud Solution group for agribusiness with a focus on commodities at SAP. His C-level experience surrounding the comprehensive transaction cycles bring deep and valuable expertise to SAP and its customers, which is essential to address the growing needs of the agribusiness industry.

The Internet Of Things: An Environmentalist’s Heaven Or Hell?

John Graham

Back in early December, The Guardian ran an article asking whether the Internet of Things will save or sacrifice the environment. As you’d expect, the answer is far from clear. Some environmentalists worry about the effects of producing, installing, and powering those billions of extra devices; others urge the use of IoT sensor networks to help us monitor and curb resource consumption and emissions.

On the surface, the thought of creating huge wireless sensor networks for the benefit of the environment seems paradoxical. However, there is a much bigger picture lurking underneath. The Global e-Sustainability Initiative’s (GeSI) recent #SMARTer2030 report suggests that IoT-related technologies could save “almost 10 times the carbon dioxide emissions that it generates by 2030 through reduced travel, smart buildings, and greater efficiencies in manufacturing and agriculture.”

Even if we achieve a situation in which physical IoT devices have a net positive effect on humanity’s carbon footprint, there is still the massive data transmission and storage growth to consider. Speaking as an executive of a company providing the cloud-based data platform for IoT networks, I can say that it’s in our best interests to keep energy consumption as low as possible, because it costs less. That’s why data centers are built with energy efficiency top of mind.

Ultimately, whether or not the IoT turns out to be an environmentalist’s dream will depend on how we apply its concepts. If it’s primarily used to stream endless high-quality video feeds 24 hours a day or for power-hungry gimmicks and trivialities, the footprint will be far worse than if it’s used directly to get resource and energy management under control. It seems unlikely that the private sector and consumers alone will summon the collective motivation to veer in the direction of the latter, so policy will need to keep up and be sound and assertive.

The attitude of disposability in Western society today is another issue altogether. Perfectly functional year-old smartphones and computers are piling up in landfills across the globe as consumers struggle to resist the lure of the latest model. Can the IoT buck this trend by being founded on sensor networks built to last? With the world trending away from centralized hardware and toward cloud-based software, it could be that upgrades to the virtual aspects of IoT will be enough to satisfy our lust for innovation, while the sensors hum away out of sight and out of mind.

Time will tell.

Register here to listen to an SAP Live webcast in which IBM’s IoT guru Michael Martin discusses the possibilities and challenges of our connected future.

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John Graham

About John Graham

John Graham is president of SAP Canada. Driving growth across SAP’s industry-leading cloud, mobile, and database solutions, he is helping more than 9,500 Canadian customers in 25 industries become best-run businesses.

Climate Change: Look North and South – The Evidence Is Real

Nancy Langmeyer

Explorer Sir Robert Swan – the first and only man to walk on both the North and South Poles unsupported – believes that “the greatest threat to our planet is the belief that someone else will save it.”

As a self-proclaimed survivor, Sir Swan, like many others around the globe, believes that climate change and global warming are very serious issues.

The United Nations (UN) adopted 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in 2015, and Goal 13 asks the world to “take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts.” According to the UN, “Climate change is now affecting every country on every continent. It is disrupting national economies and affecting lives, costing people, communities, and countries dearly today and even more tomorrow.”

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) says the rate of temperature increase around the globe has nearly doubled in the last 50 years due to greenhouse gases released as people burn fossil fuels. But even though 2016 was the hottest year in recent history, sadly there are still people in the world who say global warming is of no concern and that it is actually a “hoax!”

Well, like Sir Swan, let’s look to the North and Sole Poles and see what we can learn about the reality of this situation.

The Poles have a story to tell us…

Sir Swan believes the North and South Poles hold vital clues to the issue of global warming and that they are an indication of what is going on around the world in respect to climate change.

In his TED talk, Swan showed pictures of melting ice in the North and South Poles, describing it as a dangerous situation. He says, “We need to listen to what these places tell us, and if we don’t, we’ll end up with our own survival situation here on planet Earth.”

So, let’s start in the North and find out what we can learn there.

At 90⁰ north latitude, the North Pole is 450 miles north of Greenland, in the middle of the Arctic Ocean. There is no actual landmass at the North Pole – only massive amounts of ice that expand in winters and shrink down to half the size in summers.

The climate change story here is that the North Pole has been experiencing unusually high temperatures, reaching 32⁰ Fahrenheit in December 2016, which was 50⁰ warmer than typical! This trend has lead to an alarming shrinkage of the Arctic Sea ice masses that equates to approximately 1.07 million km² of ice loss every decade.

Why is this a problem? Well, according to the National Science Foundation, sea ice variability – the amount of water the ice puts into or pulls out of the ocean and the atmosphere – plays a significant role in climate change. NASA says that, “The sea ice cover of the Arctic Ocean and surrounding seas helps regulate the planet’s temperature, influences the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean, and impacts Arctic communities and ecosystems.”

Even the coldest place on Earth is getting warmer!

Now, in the completely opposite direction, what can we learn from the South Pole and Antarctica? At 90⁰ south latitude, Antarctica, which includes approximately 90% of the ice on the planet, is a little over 300 feet above sea level with an ice sheet on it that is about 9,000 feet thick.

Much colder than the North Pole, the temperature here has dropped to a chilling low of -135.8⁰ Fahrenheit in 2013. However, this pole, too, is experiencing warmer weather, with its highest temperature reaching 63.5⁰ in March 2015.

NASA indicates that Antarctica has been losing about 134 gigatonnes of ice per year since 2002. And just recently, a new concern emerged – a rift in the continent that could send a significant part of the polar cap off into the ocean and create one of the largest icebergs ever recorded. This could, in the long run, raise global sea levels by four inches.

So what’s a little rise in sea level?

While a couple inches here or there doesn’t seem like much, NASA says rising sea levels can erode coasts and cause more coastal flooding, and in fact, some island nations could actually disappear.

And that’s just the sea level. There are other ramifications as the climate changes, such as an increase in infectious diseases with the expansion of tropical temperature zones, more intense rain storms and hurricanes, and many other life-threatening issues.

Let’s be the “someone else”

These insights are just the tip of the iceberg (so to speak) in the story of global warming, but it is evident the Poles are telling us that climate change is real. It’s also evident that it’s time for us as the inhabitants of this world to become the “someone else” Sir Swan talks about. And the good news is that it’s not too late for us to save this planet.

We don’t have to go to the North or South Pole to make an impact. We can simply follow Swan’s advice: “A survivor sees a problem and doesn’t go, ‘Whatever.’ A survivor sees a problem and deals with that problem before it becomes a threat.”

Whether it’s at work with a company like SAP that supports the UN SDGs with its vision and purpose, or individually – we all have to help climate change before there are irreversible threats to our place. Let’s be the someone else, starting today.

A quick note: My last blog focused on how women in the arts and sports are helping to break gender inequality barriers. Well, I am happy to report that this same movement is happening in science too! In 2016, an initial 76 women in science embarked on a leadership journey to increase the awareness of climate science. The inaugural session of the year-long Homeward Bound program, which focused on empowering women in science, culminated in December 2016 with the largest female expedition in Antarctica. Here these brilliant, dedicated female scientists and engineers saw the effects of climate change first-hand and brainstormed how they, through “collaborative leadership, diverse thinking, and creative approaches,” could make an impact. 

SAP’s vision is to help the world run better and improve people’s lives. This is our enduring cause; our higher purpose. Learn more about how we work to achieve our vision and purpose.

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Nancy Langmeyer

About Nancy Langmeyer

Nancy Langmeyer is a freelance writer and marketing consultant. She works with some of the largest technology companies in the world and is a frequent blogger. You'll see some under her name...and then there are others that you won't see. These are ones where Nancy interviews marketing executives and leaders and turns their insights into thought leadership pieces..

The Future of Cybersecurity: Trust as Competitive Advantage

Justin Somaini and Dan Wellers

 

The cost of data breaches will reach US$2.1 trillion globally by 2019—nearly four times the cost in 2015.

Cyberattacks could cost up to $90 trillion in net global economic benefits by 2030 if cybersecurity doesn’t keep pace with growing threat levels.

Cyber insurance premiums could increase tenfold to $20 billion annually by 2025.

Cyberattacks are one of the top 10 global risks of highest concern for the next decade.


Companies are collaborating with a wider network of partners, embracing distributed systems, and meeting new demands for 24/7 operations.

But the bad guys are sharing intelligence, harnessing emerging technologies, and working round the clock as well—and companies are giving them plenty of weaknesses to exploit.

  • 33% of companies today are prepared to prevent a worst-case attack.
  • 25% treat cyber risk as a significant corporate risk.
  • 80% fail to assess their customers and suppliers for cyber risk.

The ROI of Zero Trust

Perimeter security will not be enough. As interconnectivity increases so will the adoption of zero-trust networks, which place controls around data assets and increases visibility into how they are used across the digital ecosystem.


A Layered Approach

Companies that embrace trust as a competitive advantage will build robust security on three core tenets:

  • Prevention: Evolving defensive strategies from security policies and educational approaches to access controls
  • Detection: Deploying effective systems for the timely detection and notification of intrusions
  • Reaction: Implementing incident response plans similar to those for other disaster recovery scenarios

They’ll build security into their digital ecosystems at three levels:

  1. Secure products. Security in all applications to protect data and transactions
  2. Secure operations. Hardened systems, patch management, security monitoring, end-to-end incident handling, and a comprehensive cloud-operations security framework
  3. Secure companies. A security-aware workforce, end-to-end physical security, and a thorough business continuity framework

Against Digital Armageddon

Experts warn that the worst-case scenario is a state of perpetual cybercrime and cyber warfare, vulnerable critical infrastructure, and trillions of dollars in losses. A collaborative approach will be critical to combatting this persistent global threat with implications not just for corporate and personal data but also strategy, supply chains, products, and physical operations.


Download the executive brief The Future of Cybersecurity: Trust as Competitive Advantage.


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Unleash The Digital Transformation

Kadamb Goswami

The world has changed. We’ve seen massive disruption on multiple fronts – business model disruption, cybercrime, new devices, and an app-centric world. Powerful networks are crucial to success in a mobile-first, cloud-first world that’s putting an ever-increasing increasing amount of data at our fingertips. With the Internet of Things (IoT) we can connect instrumented devices worldwide and use new data to transform business models and products.

Disruption

Disruption comes in many forms. It’s not big or scary, it’s just another way of describing change and evolution. In the ’80s it manifested as call centers. Then, as the digital landscape began to take shape, it was the Internet, cloud computing … now it’s artificial intelligence (AI).

Digital transformation

Digital transformation means different things to different companies, but in the end I believe it will be a simple salvation that will carry us forward. If you Bing (note I worked for Microsoft for 15 years before experiencing digital transformation from the lens of the outside world), digital transformation, it says it’s “the profound and accelerating transformation of business activities, processes, competencies, and models to fully leverage the changes and opportunities of digital technologies and their impact across society in a strategic and prioritized way.” (I’ll simplify that; keep reading.)

A lot of today’s digital transformation ideas are ripped straight from the scripts of sci-fi entertainment, whether you’re talking about the robotic assistants of 2001: A Space Odyssey or artificial intelligence in the Star Trek series. We’re forecasting our future with our imagination. So, let’s move on to why digital transformation is needed in our current world.

Business challenges

The basic challenges facing businesses today are the same as they’ve always been: engaging customers, empowering employees, optimizing operations, and reinventing the value offered to customers. However, what has changed is the unique convergence of three things:

  1. Increasing volumes of data, particularly driven by the digitization of “things” and heightened individual mobility and collaboration
  1. Advancements in data analytics and intelligence to draw actionable insight from the data
  1. Ubiquity of cloud computing, which puts this disruptive power in the hands of organizations of all sizes, increasing the pace of innovation and competition

Digital transformation in plain English

Hernan Marino, senior vice president, marketing, & global chief operating officer at SAP, explains digital transformation by giving specific industry examples to make it simpler.

Automobile manufacturing used to be the work of assembly lines, people working side-by-side literally piecing together, painting, and churning out vehicles. It transitioned to automation, reducing costs and marginalizing human error. That was a business transformation. Now, we are seeing companies like Tesla and BMW incorporate technology into their vehicles that essentially make them computers on wheels. Cameras. Sensors. GPS. Self-driving vehicles. Syncing your smartphone with your car.

The point here is that companies need to make the upfront investments in infrastructure to take advantage of digital transformation, and that upfront investment will pay dividends in the long run as technological innovations abound. It is our job to collaboratively work with our customers to understand what infrastructure changes need to be made to achieve and take advantage of digital transformation.

Harman gives electric companies as another example. Remember a few years ago, when you used to go outside your house and see the little power meter spinning as it recorded the kilowatts you use? Every month, the meter reader would show up in your yard, record your usage, and report back to the electric company.

Most electric companies then made a business transformation and installed smart meters – eliminating the cost of the meter reader and integrating most homes into a smart grid that gave customers access to their real-time information. Now, as renewable energy evolves and integrates more fully into our lives, these same electric companies that switched over to smart meters are going to make additional investments to be able to analyze the data and make more informed decisions that will benefit both the company and its customers.

That is digital transformation. Obviously, banks, healthcare, entertainment, trucking, and e-commerce all have different needs than auto manufacturers and electric companies. It is up to us – marketers and account managers promoting digital transformation – to identify those needs and help our clients make the digital transformation as seamlessly as possible.

Digital transformation is more than just a fancy buzzword, it is our present and our future. It is re-envisioning existing business models and embracing a different way of bringing together people, data, and processes to create more for their customers through systems of intelligence.

Learn more about what it means to be a digital business.

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Goswami Kadamb

About Goswami Kadamb

Kadamb is a Senior Program Manager at SAP where he is responsible for developing and executing strategic sales program with Concur SaaS portfolio. Prior to that he led several initiatives with Microsoft's Cloud & Enterprise business to enable Solution Sales & IaaS offerings.