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Why Green Building Requires Construction Companies To Digitize

Aasawari Kakade

The global green marketplace grew to $260 billion in 2013, reflecting steady client and market demand for green construction. Between 2015 and 2023, commercial building owners and managers will invest an estimated $960 billion globally in green infrastructure. Top green construction investment priorities include retrofitting old buildings, investing in energy-efficient heating, ventilation and air conditioning, and upgrading plumbing fixtures and other key technologies, reports the U.S. Green Building Council.

Green construction is rapidly becoming a competitive differentiator for construction projects. From major office buildings to multi-family developments, the market for green construction remains resilient even in the face of economic challenges. Demand for residential green construction grew from $18 billion in 2009 to $48 billion in 2013, despite the economic recession. Companies and consumers are voting with their wallets: green construction is here to stay.

Construction companies that fail to meet this market demand risk being out-performed by the competition. The digitization of the construction industry creates new opportunities for innovation and improving green methods in construction.

LEED certification and greening construction

Integrating green methods into construction is an opportunity to better use available resources while creating healthier and more energy-efficient homes and buildings. This starts with LEED certification. LEED, short for Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design, is a green building certification program that recognizes best-in-class building strategies and practices. To receive LEED certification, building projects satisfy prerequisites and earn points to achieve different levels of certification.

For example, the use of spray polyurethane foam (SPF) insulation is increasing in both new and existing homes. Using SPF can help lower heating and cooling costs thanks to a significant reduction in building-envelope air leakage, according to recent studies by the U.S. Department of Energy Building America program. The biggest energy savings are achieved when homes use SPF together with energy efficient windows and doors, HVAC systems, hot water heating, major appliances, and lighting. For example, LEED-certified buildings use 25% less energy than non LEED-certified buildings, which translates to a 19% reduction in aggregate operational costs.

Industry pushing for Green Construction Code updates, compliance documentation challenges remain

In 2014, industry representatives joined together to announce new amendments to the International Green Construction Code (IgCC). The goal is to strengthen code enforcement for energy codes, proactively assess buildings for energy performance, more effectively capture energy-saving strategies (like building orientation) in codes, and empower the International Energy Conservation Code to recognize reductions in energy use at the systems level.

Representatives from across the building industry, including code officials, building owners, manufacturers, designers, and energy efficiency advocates, have come together under the leadership of the National Institute of Building Sciences to develop a new approach to meeting energy efficiency requirements.

“A new compliance path based on targeted energy outcomes in the IgCC would represent a transformative change in the building industry that may be as significant as the advent of energy codes more than 35 years ago,” said Ralph DiNola, executive director of the New Buildings Institute. “This evolution to outcome-based performance requirements recognizes that prescriptive and modeled design approaches are often not representative of the actual energy outcomes of buildings, and that current codes fail to regulate some of the most significant energy end uses in buildings today.”

DiNola accurately sums up one of the greatest challenges facing the green construction industry: despite the best efforts of the construction industry, a single, unified approach to documentation remains a challenge. New compliance regulations will create a simplified, streamlined approach to green building, but they also pose a challenge to construction companies that may not have the resources to accurately measure energy savings reductions.

The greening of the construction industry

Sustainable, “green” construction is rapidly becoming standard practice. Between 2013 and 2015, 63% of construction companies completed new green projects, and 50% completed renovation/retrofitting work, reports McGraw-Hill’s research into world green building trends. “Going green” is not just a trend for construction companies; it is a business imperative.

Green builders face challenges putting best practices into reality. New products such as low volatile organic compound (VOC) coatings, for example, may require special installation procedures in order to perform, so contractors can’t rely on tried and true methods. They must access and use current, accurate information to ensure quality installation and compliance. The same goes for the LEED standards that are driving sustainability projects. In order to achieve and document the performance levels required in LEED facilities, contractors must remain nimble. Digital construction solutions can help.

Next steps: How digitization supports green building practices

In a digital world, new business models are emerging to disrupt traditional business processes. This includes the emergence of an open talent economy that breaks people skilled in green construction methodologies together in a borderless workplace. Contractors can scale operations rapidly by sourcing experienced talent from trade workers and management via a talent network. Digital collaboration tools and networks further support this borderless workplace, empowering effective collaboration within teams and between partners and clients. This digital approach delivers real-time status updates and eliminates lost downtime waiting from materials and equipment.

SAP’s ERP core provides near real-time information and creates the backbone required for managing projects effectively and distributing the knowledge to all the stakeholders. These digital solutions are essential to helping construction companies remain nimble and adopt green building best practices.

For more insight on this new digital age of construction, see Building a Sustainable World, How to survive and thrive in a digital construction economy.

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Aasawari Kakade

About Aasawari Kakade

Aasawari Kakade has over 11 years of experience working with customers in the Construction industry. Prior to joining SAP 3 years ago, she ran global marketing for another niche construction specific ERP. While at SAP, she is responsible for leading the SAP Advisory Council for EC&O industry along with many industry specific activities focused on enabling customers with the right SAP technology to support their business strategies and innovation objectives.

Drones: Poised For Takeoff In The Digital Economy

Stefan Guertzgen

Drones have captured the popular imagination, making a splash on social media, in the popular press, and even on hit television shows. But drones can do a lot more than entertain. They are actually a core driver of transformation in the digital economy. Here are a few examples.

Precision farming

Using swarm intelligence, specialized drones home in on weed-infested areas to prevent invasive plants from encroaching on valuable crops. These drones can deliver pesticides only and precisely where they are needed, reducing the environmental impact and increasing crop yields. Drones can also measure soil conditions as well as health status of plants to deliver water, fertilizers, or other components to ensure optimum growth. The result is increased crop yields at lower cost and with reduced use of potentially dangerous pesticides, a concept known as digital farming.

Remote location inspection and maintenance

Pipelines, mining operations, offshore oil rigs, and railroad tracks are often located far from centers of commerce, yet it is imperative that they operate flawlessly. Drones can easily monitor even the most remote stretches and when signal repairs are needed or dangerous conditions are occurring.

Spare parts delivery

When machinery and equipment goes down, time is of the essence. Drones can quickly and efficiently deliver needed spare parts from manufacturers or 3D printers directly to the equipment’s location, saving time, preventing unnecessary downtime, and reducing investments in MRO inventory.

Military observation

Drones can keep track of weapon and troop deployments in military situations without endangering humans. They can also provide a complete view of any skirmish, creating a tactical advantage by eliminating the element of surprise.

Search and rescue

Search-and-rescue missions are expensive and time-consuming. Physical limitations such as fatigue, hunger, personal safety, and the need for light and visibility can delay or slow searches conducted by human rescuers. Drones can search wide areas under challenging conditions and instantly send data back to a central location. Once the search target is identified, rescue teams can set off with the right equipment, knowing exactly where to focus their search. This makes search-and-rescue operations faster, less costly, and more effective. Watch this video for more insight.

Scientific research

Drones can track animal migrations, report on weather patterns, and help discover rare and previously unknown plant and animal species.

Life sciences

Combining nanotechnology and drones enables technology first envisioned by science fiction in the 1960s. Tiny drones can now be injected into the body to perform potentially lifesaving tasks such as micro-surgery, clear blockages, inspect aneurisms, and deliver targeted chemotherapy drugs to cancer sites.

Drones are clearly powerful agents of change as we transform to a digital economy. In addition to the examples highlighted here, drones also play an important role in such industries as insurance risk and damage assessments, wholesale distribution and last-mile deliveries, and delivery and maintenance of essential infrastructure services such as Wi-Fi, Internet, and telephone for remote locations in emerging areas. As drone technology gets more sophisticated, industries of all types will find increasingly innovative ways to use them to increase business efficiency and bolster the digital economy.

For more on how advanced technology will impact our future, see 20 Technology Predictions To Keep Your Eye On In 2017.

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Stefan Guertzgen

About Stefan Guertzgen

Dr. Stefan Guertzgen is the Global Director of Industry Solution Marketing for Chemicals at SAP. He is responsible for driving Industry Thought Leadership, Positioning & Messaging and strategic Portfolio Decisions for Chemicals.

Smart Government Strategies To Drive Measurable Success

Dr. Hichem Maya

In an era of rapid social and economic change, governments need to overcome several challenges and tap into various opportunities to sustain and improve their services. So how do governments achieve this complex task? The answer is smart government.

Smart government, by definition, can be defined as the creation of public value by synergizing technology, information, and communication to mobilize agile governance. By harnessing integrated communications technology for digital transformation, governments can become fast, measurable, affordable, and sustainable in the way they interact with their internal and external customers.

So, what does a smart vision really look like? In my view, the strategy needs to encompass multiple elements, from leveraging technology to the use of innovative business models and policies. While governments around the world are beginning to engage citizens with their smart initiatives, it’s important for us to really talk about what defines a well-rounded smart government initiative that is tipped for total success. By investing in breakthrough innovations, governments of all levels can accelerate performance to capitalize on untapped opportunities, improve services delivery, and provide a positive impact on citizens’ lives.

Happy, urban, and sustainable

Based on Dubai 2021’s vision, there are six key pillars that form the foundation of an effective smart government strategy:

  • People
  • Society
  • Experience
  • Place
  • Economy
  • Government

So why are we starting with people? We’re in what’s often termed the age of the citizen, and the whole premise of smart government hinges on the people it serves. Enhancing the customer experience to ensure citizen happiness and satisfaction while improving lives through enhanced convenience is the core emphasis of smart government. Within this, the citizen-centric smart foundation is all about creating a framework and infrastructure to foster educated, aware, cultured, and healthy individuals who are productive in their lives and innovative in their field.

Society is an extension of the individual and therefore forms the next critical pillar of the smart foundation. A vibrant, sustainable, and multicultural society needs to remain at the heart of every governance model.

Growing urbanization has led to its own set of needs, challenges, and expectations. Best-run public sector organizations address growing urbanization, demands for accountability, rising citizen service requirements, and safety expectations by focusing on key imperatives. That defines the experience pillar. An additional objective is to provide a rich cultural experience in a safe and secure environment.

What’s the point of any strategy if it’s not sustainable? An ever-growing population and shifting demographics are creating relentless demands for jobs, business, talent, investments, infrastructure, trade, and commerce.

The greatest challenge of any economy today is balancing growth with sustainability. The ideal plan is to focus on creating smart, integrated, and connected cities where:

  • Resources are used sustainably
  • Environmental elements are clean, healthy, and sustainable
  • Safe and resiliently built environments are nurtured

Government and economy do the tango

Globalization and the impact of trade and competition have meant that governments can now tap into the opportunity to create financially sustainable and innovative knowledge economies. To be attractive as a global economy, a city needs sustainable economic growth and to be a business- friendly city and a preferred investment destination.

The emphasis must be achieving excellence in governance by being proactive. Real-time reporting and data analytics can provide governments with instant insights to make informed decisions at the right time. Compliance and risk management, as well as fraud detection and prevention, all lead to excellence in governance.

Finally, of course, a pioneering economy and government needs to be sustainable and innovative in the management of its resources while being transparent and reliable in its dealings. The various elements within a smart framework must include access to capital, labor, skills, and training, state-of-the-art technology and government services, along with a robust business environment enjoying suitable policy support.

By engaging, improving, and managing interactions with their stakeholders, smart governments can create lasting public value. That’s where the true value of being smart is.

For an example of one smart government in action, see How the Port of Hamburg Doubled Capacity with Digitization.

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Dr. Hichem Maya

About Dr. Hichem Maya

Dr. Hichem Maya leads the industry digital transformation and value engineering team in the Middle East and North Africa at SAP. The organization helps businesses from a variety of industries to identify the proper value generated through digital technologies adoption.

How Emotionally Aware Computing Can Bring Happiness to Your Organization

Christopher Koch


Do you feel me?

Just as once-novel voice recognition technology is now a ubiquitous part of human–machine relationships, so too could mood recognition technology (aka “affective computing”) soon pervade digital interactions.

Through the application of machine learning, Big Data inputs, image recognition, sensors, and in some cases robotics, artificially intelligent systems hunt for affective clues: widened eyes, quickened speech, and crossed arms, as well as heart rate or skin changes.




Emotions are big business

The global affective computing market is estimated to grow from just over US$9.3 billion a year in 2015 to more than $42.5 billion by 2020.

Source: “Affective Computing Market 2015 – Technology, Software, Hardware, Vertical, & Regional Forecasts to 2020 for the $42 Billion Industry” (Research and Markets, 2015)

Customer experience is the sweet spot

Forrester found that emotion was the number-one factor in determining customer loyalty in 17 out of the 18 industries it surveyed – far more important than the ease or effectiveness of customers’ interactions with a company.


Source: “You Can’t Afford to Overlook Your Customers’ Emotional Experience” (Forrester, 2015)


Humana gets an emotional clue

Source: “Artificial Intelligence Helps Humana Avoid Call Center Meltdowns” (The Wall Street Journal, October 27, 2016)

Insurer Humana uses artificial intelligence software that can detect conversational cues to guide call-center workers through difficult customer calls. The system recognizes that a steady rise in the pitch of a customer’s voice or instances of agent and customer talking over one another are causes for concern.

The system has led to hard results: Humana says it has seen an 28% improvement in customer satisfaction, a 63% improvement in agent engagement, and a 6% improvement in first-contact resolution.


Spread happiness across the organization

Source: “Happiness and Productivity” (University of Warwick, February 10, 2014)

Employers could monitor employee moods to make organizational adjustments that increase productivity, effectiveness, and satisfaction. Happy employees are around 12% more productive.




Walking on emotional eggshells

Whether customers and employees will be comfortable having their emotions logged and broadcast by companies is an open question. Customers may find some uses of affective computing creepy or, worse, predatory. Be sure to get their permission.


Other limiting factors

The availability of the data required to infer a person’s emotional state is still limited. Further, it can be difficult to capture all the physical cues that may be relevant to an interaction, such as facial expression, tone of voice, or posture.



Get a head start


Discover the data

Companies should determine what inferences about mental states they want the system to make and how accurately those inferences can be made using the inputs available.


Work with IT

Involve IT and engineering groups to figure out the challenges of integrating with existing systems for collecting, assimilating, and analyzing large volumes of emotional data.


Consider the complexity

Some emotions may be more difficult to discern or respond to. Context is also key. An emotionally aware machine would need to respond differently to frustration in a user in an educational setting than to frustration in a user in a vehicle.

 


 

download arrowTo learn more about how affective computing can help your organization, read the feature story Empathy: The Killer App for Artificial Intelligence.


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Christopher Koch

About Christopher Koch

Christopher Koch is the Editorial Director of the SAP Center for Business Insight. He is an experienced publishing professional, researcher, editor, and writer in business, technology, and B2B marketing. Share your thoughts with Chris on Twitter @Ckochster.

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Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

David Trites

About David Trites

David Trites is a Director of SAP Global Marketing. He is responsible for producing interesting and compelling customer stories that will humanize the SAP brand, support sales and marketing teams across SAP, and increase the awareness of SAP in key markets.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Harin Nanayakkaara

About Harin Nanayakkaara

Harin Nanayakkaara is part of attune’s leadership team and heads the global marketing, branding and communication efforts. He is passionate about technology and its role in shaping the fashion landscape, and has worked closely on delivering business value to clients such as Crocs and Brooks Brothers.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Brian Wasson

About Brian Wasson

Brian Wasson is the Director of Global Marketing & Communications at SAP. His specialties include strategic and hands-on experience in social media, website and intranet management, sustainability and CSR communications, public relations/media relations, employee (internal) communications, publication editing and management, and direct marketing.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tiffany Rowe

About Tiffany Rowe

Tiffany Rowe is a marketing administrator who assists in contributing resourceful content. Tiffany prides herself in her ability to provide high-quality content that readers will find valuable.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tracy Vides

About Tracy Vides

Tracy is a content marketer and social media consultant who works with small businesses and startups to increase their visibility. Although new to the digital marketing scene, Tracy has started off well by building a good reputation for herself, with posts featured on Steamfeed, Business 2 Community and elsewhere. Hit her up @TracyVides on Twitter.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Michael Brenner

About Michael Brenner

Michael Brenner is a globally-recognized keynote speaker, author of  The Content Formula and the CEO of Marketing Insider GroupHe has worked in leadership positions in sales and marketing for global brands like SAP and Nielsen, as well as for thriving startups. Today, Michael shares his passion on leadership and marketing strategies that deliver customer value and business impact. He is recognized by the Huffington Post as a Top Business Keynote Speaker and   a top  CMO influencer by Forbes.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Jim Cook

About Jim Cook

Jim Cook is the Industry Advisor for consumer industries in South East Asia, with over 20 years’ experience of IT and business consulting. He has held various roles from solution architect, project and program management, business development as well as managing an SAP partner organisation. Jim is passionate about transformation within consumer driven organisations. Jim is particular interested in customer engagement solutions and the value that can be achieved from end to end SAP deployments.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Elizabeth Milne

About Elizabeth Milne

Elizabeth Milne has over 20 years of experience improving the software solutions for multi-national, multi-billion dollar organizations. Her finance career began working at Walt Disney, then Warner Bros. in the areas of financial consolidation, budgeting, and financial reporting. She subsequently moved to the software industry and has held positions including implementation consultant and manager, account executive, pre-sales consultant, solution management team at SAP, Business Objects and Cartesis. She graduated with an Executive MBA from Northwestern University’s Kellogg Graduate School of Management. In 2014 she published her first book “Accelerated Financial Closing with SAP.” She currently manages the accounting and financial close portfolio for SAP Product Marketing. You can follow her on twitter @ElizabethEMilne

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness