Sections

How Does Globalization Affect Resources?

Danielle Beurteaux

How do our global and very interconnected markets effect resource volatility?

The evidence points to increasing resource volatility as globalization grows, including in agricultural products. “The globalized world increases the pressure on resources, making even basic food volatile, and especially increasing the pressure on energy and metals,” says Kai Goerlich, SAP’s Idea Director, who led the research.

This research is based on World Bank data and converted into 2010 U.S. dollars for consistency. This is part one of a two-part series.

Top 10 resources and trends

1. Cotton

The top cotton-producing countries are India, China, and the U.S.

The cotton world had a bit of a shock last year when news came out that China was about to unload its massive cotton reserves, which sent prices down. But China didn’t actually flood the cotton market, and cotton production has also decreased somewhat, both of which reversed the price decrease.

The USDA also reports that production levels have recently decreased, particularly in West Africa. Demand from Pakistan increased because its own crop was damaged by pests – good news for India, which increased exports to Pakistan to make up the shortfall.

2. Maize

Maize, aka corn, makes up about a third of global cereal production, according to the World Bank. Maize production has increased over the past 20-odd years, mostly due to its increase as a crop in Asia. The Asian, Canadian, and Australian markets have had an effect on the U.S. Notwithstanding that areas of America’s Midwest are still known as the “breadbasket,” U.S. maize production is actually on a downward trend. It will be interesting to see if the Trans-Pacific Partnership, once (or if) signed will change that development.

3. Platinum

Platinum might be known to consumers mostly for jewelry, but the primary market for this metal is automotive. The majority of platinum comes from South Africa; Russia is the second largest producer. The World Platinum Investment Council is predicting that the metal’s market deficit will decrease this year because of the increased availability of recycled metals and less demand. However, others think the deficit is permanent and predict that platinum will return to its historical price above gold. Much of this depends on demand from global industry, particularly in China.

Here’s an example of the global nature of resources: South African mine workers’ union contracts expire in June. Labor disruptions would, obviously, affect the availability and price of platinum worldwide.

4. Crude oil

It was only recently that the price for crude oil fell yet again due to high inventories, global output, and less demand. What a difference a raging fire can make. The fire in Fort McMurray, Alberta, which began on May 1, has forced the evacuation of the town and the major oil producers have halted or shut down production. This sent crude oil prices back up to almost $50 a barrel, from $26 earlier in the year. Canada is the U.S.’s major supplier of oil.

5. Sawnwood

As with other wood products, there has been an increase in sawnwood production and demand recently, the biggest since the economic downturn post-2008, according to the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization. There has been an increase in production in some European countries, in part because of recent wind storms that knocked down trees. Also, Europe is slowly reforesting, most dramatically in Ireland with a 52% increase in forested lands.

6. Lead

Lead is a valuable ore that is relatively simple to mine and has a high value, with a global market of approximately $15 billion. While production has slowed somewhat, it’s interesting to note that what’s referred to as the “secondary production,” which includes recyclables, is now almost at par with mined lead. In the U.S., most lead production comes from secondary production, and most of it is used for lead-acid batteries. And even though global stocks and production are decreasing, the price per ton is, too. One reason for that is the search and adoption of alternatives that are more environmentally friendly.

7. Sorghum

Sorghum is grain used mostly for livestock feed and ethanol products. The U.S. is the biggest sorghum producer, followed by Mexico and Nigeria.  Its benefits are that it’s relatively drought- and disease-resistant. But that hasn’t stopped the global sorghum market from experiencing a downturn in demand, driven mostly by China for animal feed. China was responsible for almost 80% of U.S. sorghum exports in 2014-2015. But now it looks like China’s government wants to import less and is using up some of its own stockpiles instead.

8. Sugar

A sweet tooth is about to get more expensive. There’s more sugar demand than supply for the first time in five years. This is good news for sugar producers; the price of sugar recently fell to below production cost. Weather conditions, particularly El Niño, have been a problem in decreasing sugar supply. The EU recently surveyed member states’ opinions on raising sugar supplies because the stockpile is heading to dangerous lows, with potential shortages as soon as this summer.

9. Meat and chicken

The world’s appetite for meat continues to grow. Again, China is driving consumption of chicken, sheep, and pigs, and Brazil takes the top slot for beef. Here’s some interesting data from the OECD about global meat consumption: yet again, China’s economic outlook and tastes are shaping global markets. A Chinese company recently purchased Brazil’s largest soybean producer – soybean is used as animal feed. The Australian government recently blocked the sale of a cattle station conglomerate to Dahang Australia, which is mostly controlled by the Shanghai Pengxin Group. The sale was for 2.5% of Australia’s agriculture land and 185,000 cattle.

10. Tea

It’s been a tough year for some tea producers. Assam, the state in India famed for its teas, has been affected by heavy rains and cool temperatures, which will have an negative effect on the “second flush” (second growth) teas. India is the world’s second largest tea producer (China is the largest; Kenya is third), and most of it is grown on Assam’s tea plantations. Heavy rainfalls, dry periods, and pests are all making tea growing a challenge. Tea is actually the second most popular drink worldwide – the first is water. As noted in this U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization report, tea is pretty picky about growing conditions, and there are only a few areas in the world where it grows well. Overall, tea production, exports, and consumption all grew, and the FAO predicts this trend will continue. However, climate change is a top concern of tea producers and could be the biggest challenge to established producing regions.

Industries are realizing the advantages of the Internet of Things and digital transformation at different speeds and on different scales. IDC reveals how in The Internet of Things and Digital Transformation: A Tale of Four Industries.

For more insight on digital transformation, join us at SAPPHIRE NOW and attend the session “Build Resilience into Digital Supply Networks by Using Live Business.”

Comments

Live Product Innovation, Part 2: IoT, Big Data, and Smart Connected Products

John McNiff

In Part 1 of this series, we looked at how in-memory computing affects live product innovation. In Part 2, we explore the impact of the Internet of Things (IoT) and Big Data on smart connected products. In Part 3, we’ll approach the topic from the perspective of process industries.

Live engineering? Live product innovation? Live R&D?

To some people, these concepts sound implausible. When you talk about individualized product launches with lifecycles of days or weeks, people in industries like aerospace and defense (A&D) look askance.

But today, most industries—not just consumer-driven ones—need timely insights and the ability to respond quickly. Even A&D manufacturers want to understand the impact of changes before they continue with designs that could be difficult to make at the right quantity or prone to problems in the field.

The Internet of Everything?

Internet of Things (IoT) technologies promise to give manufacturers these insights. But there’s still a lot of confusion around IoT. Some people think it is about connected appliances; others think it’s just a rebranded “shop floor to top floor.”

The better way to think about IoT is from the perspective of data: We want to get data from the connected “thing.” If you’re the manufacturer, that thing is a product. If you buy the product and sell it to an end customer, that thing is an asset. If you’re the end customer, that thing is a fleet. Each stakeholder wants different data in different volumes for different reasons.

It’s also important to remember that the Internet has existed for far longer than IoT.

There’s a huge amount of non-IoT data that can offer useful insights. Point-of-sale data, news feeds, and market insights from social channels are all valuable. And think about how much infrastructure is now connected in “smart” cities. So in addition to products, assets, and fleets, there are also people, markets, and infrastructure. Big Data is everywhere, and it should influence what you release and when.

New data, new processes

It has been said that data in the 21st century is like oil in the 18th century: an immense, valuable, yet untapped asset. But if data is the new oil, then do we need a new refinery? The answer is yes.

On top of business data, we now have a plethora of information sources outside our company walls. Ownership of, and access to, this data is becoming complex. Manufacturers collecting data about equipment at customer sites, for example, may want to sell that data to customers as an add-on service. But those customers are likely using equipment from multiple manufacturers, and they likely have their own unique uses for the information.

So the new information refinery needs to capture information from everywhere and turn it into something that has meaning for the end user. It needs to leverage data science and machine learning to remove the noise and add insight and intelligence. It also needs to be an open platform to gather information from all six sources (products, assets, fleets, people, markets, infrastructure).

And wouldn’t it be great if the data refinery ran on the same platform as your business processes, so that you could sense, respond, and act to achieve your business goals?

Digital product innovation platform

If you start with the concept of a smart connected product, the data refinery — the digital product innovation platform — has five requirements:

  1. Systems design — Manufacturers need to design across disciplines in a systems approach. Mechanical, mechatronic, electrical, electronics, and software all need to be supported, with modeling capabilities that cover physical, functional, and logical structures.
  1. Requirements-linked platform design — Designers need to think about where and how to embed sensors and intelligence to match functional requirements. This will need to be forward-thinking to cover unforeseen methods of machine-to-machine interactions. In a world of performance-based contracts, it will be important to minimize the impact of design changes as innovation opportunities grow.
  1. Instant impact and insight environment — The platform must support fully traceable requirements throughout the lifecycle, from design concept to asset performance.
  1. Product-based enterprise processes — The platform needs to share model-based product data visually — through electrical CAD, electronic CAD, 3D, and software functions — to the people who need it. This isn’t new, but what’s different is that the platform can’t wait for complex integrations between systems. Think about software-enabled innovation or virtual inventory made possible by on-demand 3D printing. Production is almost real time, so design will have to be as well.
  1. Product and thing network — A complex, cross-domain design process involves a growing number of partners. That calls for a product network to allow for secure collaboration across functions and outside the company walls. Instead of every partner having its own portal for product data, the product network would store digital twins and allow instant sharing of asset intelligence.

If the network is connected to the digital product innovation platform, you can control the lifecycle both internally and externally — and take the product right into the service and maintenance domain. You can then provide field information directly from the assets back to design to inform what to update, and when. Add over-the-air software compatibility checks and updates, and discrete manufacturers can achieve a true live engineering environment.

Sound like a dream? It’s coming sooner than you think.

Learn more about supply chain innovations at SAP.com or follow us on @SCMatSAP for the latest news.

Comments

John McNiff

About John McNiff

John McNiff is the Vice President of Solution Management for the R&D/Engineering line-of-business business unit at SAP. John has held a number of sales and business development roles at SAP, focused on the manufacturing and engineering topics.

Leveraging Contract Manufacturing Organizations In Life Sciences

Joseph Miles

The 21st century has been a remarkable and volatile time in the life sciences industry.

The onset of the patent cliff in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology sectors set forth a variety of strategies that have quite literally changed the face of the industry. Organizations, in an attempt to recoup the lost revenue and margin from patent expirations on blockbuster products, began acquiring companies at a pace that has never been seen before. What has emerged is a new and more focused industry. Non-strategic divisions where sold off in divestitures and focus areas were expanded with acquisitions that grew their pipeline, markets, and revenues.

In spite of all the M&A activity, the industry continues to explore new ways of improving their operating margins.   Outsourcing of operational processes has continued to increase in importance across the industry as organizations look for ways of reducing operational overhead.

Long used in the medical device and equipment sector, pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies have traditionally had more of an insource approach to manufacturing but that continued to change. Drug companies are not only leveraging contract manufacturing organizations (CMO) for less complex small molecule and active pharmaceutical ingredient production (API) but are now leveraging CMOs for more complex, large molecule products in spite of that manufacturing complexity.

This strategy is not without risk as organizations understand that you can outsource the process but you cannot outsource the accountability for that process. This dramatic transformation of business models, processes, and work strategies are focused on returning to the levels of profitability that had been accomplished earlier in their history.

If that isn’t complicated enough, the industry continues to see the emergence of global regulations that make manufacturing a complicated process to outsource. Global serialization, outlined in my previous blog, “The Rapidly Changing World of Serialization in Life Sciences,” now requires drug manufacturers to include a unique serial number on every vial of product produced. That serial number coordination with the CMO is challenging and is further complicated as the drug manufacturer is required to submit the information to global regulatory agencies who want to track the serial numbers to ensure the integrity of the product and, ultimately, the safety of the patient.

My team is very passionate about our ability to help global pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and medical device companies during these very challenging times. Life sciences companies should consider leveraging a cloud-based approach to direct materials that supports all aspects of direct material procurement. This should include processes to support supplier audits, approved vendor lists, purchase order releases, and blanket purchase orders. The cloud helps organizations reduce their capital expenses while also simplifying the IT support to enable the process.

Life sciences companies should also consider aggressively leveraging CMOs for the manufacturing of their products, even in this highly regulated industry. This would include the medical device and equipment segments that have leveraged CMO strategies for many decades but also drug companies inclusive of the serialized information.

Organizations are not only able to provide the CMO with all of the work orders, manufacturing instructions, routings, and standard operating procedures for regulated manufacturing, but they also have the ability to manage and generate all serial number information that would be applied to every vial of pharmaceutical and/or biotechnology product during the manufacturing process. This information can be delivered through a network that further simplifies the process and improves operational efficiencies, ultimately reducing the total cost of ownership to support the process.

Life sciences companies should not just be content with leveraging the cloud to enable the direct material and contract manufacturing processes for small and large molecule compounds, including serial number support, to meet global regulations. The network can be exploited further in the area of operational quality and production tracking. Manufacturing data, batch reports, quality information, and operational KPIs can be shared across the network to ensure the manufacturers have full visibility and transparency around the outsourced processes. This is highly strategic and reflects the underlying complexity of enabling outsourced manufacturing across all segments of the life sciences industry.

For more on digitalization in the life sciences industry, see Special Compliance Aspects And Quick Wins In The Life Sciences Industry.

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

Joseph Miles

About Joseph Miles

Joseph Miles is Global Vice President pf Life Sciences at SAP. He is passionate about helping organizations improve outcomes for their patients and enable innovation across the health sciences value chain.

How Emotionally Aware Computing Can Bring Happiness to Your Organization

Christopher Koch


Do you feel me?

Just as once-novel voice recognition technology is now a ubiquitous part of human–machine relationships, so too could mood recognition technology (aka “affective computing”) soon pervade digital interactions.

Through the application of machine learning, Big Data inputs, image recognition, sensors, and in some cases robotics, artificially intelligent systems hunt for affective clues: widened eyes, quickened speech, and crossed arms, as well as heart rate or skin changes.




Emotions are big business

The global affective computing market is estimated to grow from just over US$9.3 billion a year in 2015 to more than $42.5 billion by 2020.

Source: “Affective Computing Market 2015 – Technology, Software, Hardware, Vertical, & Regional Forecasts to 2020 for the $42 Billion Industry” (Research and Markets, 2015)

Customer experience is the sweet spot

Forrester found that emotion was the number-one factor in determining customer loyalty in 17 out of the 18 industries it surveyed – far more important than the ease or effectiveness of customers’ interactions with a company.


Source: “You Can’t Afford to Overlook Your Customers’ Emotional Experience” (Forrester, 2015)


Humana gets an emotional clue

Source: “Artificial Intelligence Helps Humana Avoid Call Center Meltdowns” (The Wall Street Journal, October 27, 2016)

Insurer Humana uses artificial intelligence software that can detect conversational cues to guide call-center workers through difficult customer calls. The system recognizes that a steady rise in the pitch of a customer’s voice or instances of agent and customer talking over one another are causes for concern.

The system has led to hard results: Humana says it has seen an 28% improvement in customer satisfaction, a 63% improvement in agent engagement, and a 6% improvement in first-contact resolution.


Spread happiness across the organization

Source: “Happiness and Productivity” (University of Warwick, February 10, 2014)

Employers could monitor employee moods to make organizational adjustments that increase productivity, effectiveness, and satisfaction. Happy employees are around 12% more productive.




Walking on emotional eggshells

Whether customers and employees will be comfortable having their emotions logged and broadcast by companies is an open question. Customers may find some uses of affective computing creepy or, worse, predatory. Be sure to get their permission.


Other limiting factors

The availability of the data required to infer a person’s emotional state is still limited. Further, it can be difficult to capture all the physical cues that may be relevant to an interaction, such as facial expression, tone of voice, or posture.



Get a head start


Discover the data

Companies should determine what inferences about mental states they want the system to make and how accurately those inferences can be made using the inputs available.


Work with IT

Involve IT and engineering groups to figure out the challenges of integrating with existing systems for collecting, assimilating, and analyzing large volumes of emotional data.


Consider the complexity

Some emotions may be more difficult to discern or respond to. Context is also key. An emotionally aware machine would need to respond differently to frustration in a user in an educational setting than to frustration in a user in a vehicle.

 


 

download arrowTo learn more about how affective computing can help your organization, read the feature story Empathy: The Killer App for Artificial Intelligence.


Comments

About Christopher Koch

Christopher Koch is the Editorial Director of the SAP Center for Business Insight. He is an experienced publishing professional, researcher, editor, and writer in business, technology, and B2B marketing. Share your thoughts with Chris on Twitter @Ckochster.

Tags:

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

About David Trites

David Trites is a Director of SAP Global Marketing. He is responsible for producing interesting and compelling customer stories that will humanize the SAP brand, support sales and marketing teams across SAP, and increase the awareness of SAP in key markets.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Harin Nanayakkaara

About Harin Nanayakkaara

Harin Nanayakkaara is part of attune’s leadership team and heads the global marketing, branding and communication efforts. He is passionate about technology and its role in shaping the fashion landscape, and has worked closely on delivering business value to clients such as Crocs and Brooks Brothers.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

About Brian Wasson

Brian Wasson is the Director of Global Marketing & Communications at SAP. His specialties include strategic and hands-on experience in social media, website and intranet management, sustainability and CSR communications, public relations/media relations, employee (internal) communications, publication editing and management, and direct marketing.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tiffany Rowe

About Tiffany Rowe

Tiffany Rowe is a marketing administrator who assists in contributing resourceful content. Tiffany prides herself in her ability to provide high-quality content that readers will find valuable.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

About Tracy Vides

Tracy is a content marketer and social media consultant who works with small businesses and startups to increase their visibility. Although new to the digital marketing scene, Tracy has started off well by building a good reputation for herself, with posts featured on Steamfeed, Business 2 Community and elsewhere. Hit her up @TracyVides on Twitter.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

About Michael Brenner

Michael Brenner is a globally-recognized keynote speaker, author of  The Content Formula and the CEO of Marketing Insider GroupHe has worked in leadership positions in sales and marketing for global brands like SAP and Nielsen, as well as for thriving startups. Today, Michael shares his passion on leadership and marketing strategies that deliver customer value and business impact. He is recognized by the Huffington Post as a Top Business Keynote Speaker and   a top  CMO influencer by Forbes.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Jim Cook

About Jim Cook

Jim Cook is the Industry Advisor for consumer industries in South East Asia, with over 20 years’ experience of IT and business consulting. He has held various roles from solution architect, project and program management, business development as well as managing an SAP partner organisation. Jim is passionate about transformation within consumer driven organisations. Jim is particular interested in customer engagement solutions and the value that can be achieved from end to end SAP deployments.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Elizabeth Milne

About Elizabeth Milne

Elizabeth Milne has over 20 years of experience improving the software solutions for multi-national, multi-billion dollar organizations. Her finance career began working at Walt Disney, then Warner Bros. in the areas of financial consolidation, budgeting, and financial reporting. She subsequently moved to the software industry and has held positions including implementation consultant and manager, account executive, pre-sales consultant, solution management team at SAP, Business Objects and Cartesis. She graduated with an Executive MBA from Northwestern University’s Kellogg Graduate School of Management. In 2014 she published her first book “Accelerated Financial Closing with SAP.” She currently manages the accounting and financial close portfolio for SAP Product Marketing. You can follow her on twitter @ElizabethEMilne

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness