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Chief Supply Chain Officer: The Most Transformative Executive In The C-Suite

Hans Thalbauer

Customer experience and omnichannel commerce have been the hot business topics over the past couple of years, and for good reason. Emerging technologies such as mobile and social platforms have changed customer behaviors. They’ve also provided companies with new ways to engage customers.

But mobile and social are only part of the picture, and they take you only so far in becoming truly customer-centric and differentiating yourself in the marketplace. To compete in the digital economy, companies are discovering they must embrace more fundamental change. And to achieve that, they’re renewing their focus on the extended supply chain.

That new scrutiny has raised the profile of supply chain executives. In fact, several prominent companies have tapped people with supply chain experience to lead the enterprise – Apple’s Tim Cook and GM’s Mary Barra being just two examples.

But more organizations are creating a new role: chief supply chain officer (CSCO). The CEO runs the company. The CFO holds the purse strings. But today, the CSCO may be the most important role in the executive suite.

CSCOs for customer-centricity

Consumer products companies were among the first to establish the CSCO role. In part this is because the consumer products industry took the lead in pursuing omnichannel strategies. Retail changed dramatically as consumers embraced online shopping and direct delivery. Consumer products companies needed to retool their supply chains with the speed, visibility, and flexibility necessary to serve multiple channels consistently and effectively.

But the CSCO is strategic to any organization that intends to be customer focused. And increasingly, that’s every manufacturer. In manufacturing and asset-intensive industries, the CSCO is sometimes called the chief operations officer (COO). But whatever you call it, manufacturers need someone in the executive suite who’s responsible for all extended supply chain processes, from product innovation to product delivery.

That level of leadership is necessary as manufacturers grapple with the new drivers of the extended supply chain. Omnichannel strategies make the supply chain more complex. The need to deliver individualized products and become more customer-centric means the supply chain must be faster, smarter, and more flexible.

It’s no longer enough to make incremental improvements. CSCOs must lead the charge to actually transform the supply chain. For example, they need to continuously predict demand and automatically adjust product allocations across every channel. They must integrate warehouse and transportation processes to enable same-day or even one-hour shipments.

Extending the enterprise

But CSCOs aren’t only revolutionizing the supply chain. They’re also transforming the organization and its competitive posture. One key way they’re doing that is by bringing new talent into the enterprise.

First, the new business processes and business models of the digital economy are placing a premium on data analytics. Companies need data scientists who know how to analyze massive amounts of data and interpret the results accurately.

Second, the new emphasis on speed and flexibility creates a need for a larger contingent workforce. Especially in manufacturing and warehousing, organizations will rely on contingent labor to respond to demand fluctuation.

Third, manufacturing and warehousing will rely more and more on automation, especially robotics and the Internet of Things (IoT). While these technologies replace some skills, they call for new capabilities to manage digitized processes.

All these workforce changes begin in manufacturing and logistics, the purview of the CSCO. But they extend throughout the enterprise, placing the CSCO in a position to influence the skillset of the organization overall.

Fundamental drivers such as individualized products and customer-centricity are upending the traditional supply chains. They’re doing the same to the executive suite. A CSCO who knows how to respond can transform not just your supply and demand networks, but your entire company and its competitive position in the marketplace.

For more on rapid developments in the enterprise and what that means for your leadership, see Who Will Lead Development of the Internet of Things Inside the Organization?

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Hans Thalbauer

About Hans Thalbauer

Hans Thalbauer is the Senior Vice President, Extended Supply Chain, at SAP. He is responsible for the strategic direction and the Go-To-Market of solutions for Supply Chain, Logistics, Engineering/R&D, Manufacturing, Asset Management and Sustainability at SAP.

Connected Cars Rev Up For A Revolution [VIDEO]

Michael Zipf

Every two years, almost a million car enthusiasts flock to the Frankfurt International Motor Show (IAA), the world’s largest automotive trade fair, to enjoy the legendary spectacle of automakers rolling out their latest models to an accompaniment of flashing lights, throbbing bass beats, and stylishly dressed dancers.

While the giant exhibition halls on the ground Couple buying a car --- Image by © Don Mason/Blend Images/Corbisfloor echo to the sound of visitors jostling to examine paint work and leather, sleek sports cars, people carriers, electric vehicles, and the ubiquitous SUVs, the atmosphere in the New Mobility World exhibition on the first floor is altogether calmer. Nevertheless, this is where pressing issues about the future of mobility are being discussed.

The exhibitors here include Samsung, IBM, Deutsche Telekom, and – making its debut appearance – SAP. Awake to the far-reaching revolution that lies ahead of the automotive sector, these IT companies are in Frankfurt to showcase ways in which information technology is already making it possible to connect today’s highly digitized vehicles with each other, with their drivers, and with the technological infrastructure around them.

Revved up for a revolution

Chris Urmson considers the convergence of vehicles and IT to be “the most exciting development of our age.” Speaking in Frankfurt, Urmson, who heads up Google’s driverless car program, described the number of people killed on America’s roads every year – 36,000 – as “unacceptable” and stressed that his company’s intensive research into autonomous vehicles was aimed at improving road safety.

Robert Wolcott, Professor of Innovation Management and Corporate Entrepreneurship at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management, spoke of “a new industrial revolution” whose impact would be “on a par with that of the railroads in the 19th century.”

So it’s no surprise that the IT sector is steering its focus toward the automotive industry.

At the IAA’s Smart City Forum, SAP has teamed up with various cities to present solutions designed to put an end to the daily traffic gridlock. And, to judge by the figures below, their capabilities are sorely needed:

  • By 2050, around 70% of the global population will be living in cities.
  • The number of cars on the planet is set to almost double by 2030.
  • Experts predict that the volume of freight traffic on Europe’s roads will increase 80% by 2025.
  • On average, a car driver in Germany spends 36 hours stuck in traffic jams every year.

Smart cities for a better quality of life

Smart Traffic Control enables cities to optimize traffic-light controls and free up additional car lanes during the rush hour to alleviate congestion, while data collected by RFID chips, sensors, cameras, and induction loops is used to compile congestion profiles and monitor real-time traffic issues. The Chinese city of Nanjing, which is home to 8 million people, has chosen to adopt smart traffic control technology to crunch the 20 billion data points captured in the city every year to produce actionable information for predictively responding to traffic congestion. And the software even learns as it goes along. In June of this year, the city signed a Custom Development Project with SAP. Currently, the SAP HANA platform helps Nanging analyze the data generated by its 10,000 taxis. The plan is for other modes of transportation to provide data in the future too.

“Smart traffic is one of the hottest topics for the world’s ever-expanding cities,” says Norbert Koppenhagen from the SAP Innovation Center Network, who is also at the IAA to showcase SAP’s cooperation with the German city of Darmstadt, near Frankfurt. “If we can keep the traffic flowing, we’ll make city-dwellers’ lives a whole lot more livable.”

The SAP Vehicle Insights cloud application links vehicular data with sensor data to provide actionable insight into driver behavior patterns and efficiency. The software helps logistics and mobility services providers monitor live vehicle conditions and manage their services within the constraints imposed by pollution and traffic congestion. The SAP Vehicle Insights also helps fleet operators manage their fleets optimally.

City App is another innovation being showcased in Frankfurt. Developed in collaboration with the German city of Nuremberg, this app features crowdsourcing functions that allow citizens to report defects and damage in their immediate vicinity. Algorithms assimilate these reports with data about factors such as traffic density in the affected city zone to help municipal authorities optimize their response.

There is also considerable buzz around TwoGo, the mobile app that lets employees at enterprises, institutions, and municipal authorities link up and share their daily commute to the office. “This is an exciting time for TwoGo,” says Alexander Machold, a member of the TwoGo business development team. “We’ve got vehicle manufacturers, parking garage operators, local authorities, and government ministries all looking into how TwoGo could help them cut costs and develop new business models.” What’s more, he says, the app sometimes opens the door to cross-selling opportunities for other SAP solutions.

“The number of connected cars on our roads is growing; more and more vehicles are being outfitted with sensors; and even driverless cars are becoming a genuine possibility. All in all, this is a great opportunity for us to transform cities, industries, and businesses sustainably to create a better future,” says Stephan Brand, Vice President, PI Analytics Applications, Products and Innovation at SAP.

The Internet has changed the way we buy cars, while mobile technology is changing what we expect them to do. Learn more about The Hyperconnected Car.

This story also appeared in the SAP Business Trends community.

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How One Business Approach Can Save The Environment – And Bring $4.5 Trillion To The World Economy

Shelly Dutton

Despite reports of a turbulent global economy, the World Bank delivered some great news recently. For the first time in history, extreme poverty (people living on less than $1.90 each day) worldwide is set to fall to below 10%. Considering that this rate has declined from 37.1% in 1990 to 9.6% in 2015, it is hopeful that one-third of the global population will participate the middle class by 2030.

For all industries, this growth will bring new challenges and pressures when meeting unprecedented demand in an environment of dwindling – if not already scarce – resources. First of all, gold, silver, indium, iridium, tungsten, and many other vital resources could be depleted in as little as five years. And because current manufacturing methods create massive waste, about 80% of $3.2 trillion material value is lost irrecoverably each year in the consumer products industry alone.

This new reality is forcing companies to rethink our current, linear “take-make-dispose” approach to designing, producing, delivering, and selling products and services. According to Dan Wellers, Digital Futures lead for SAP, “If the economy is not sustainable, we are in trouble. And in the case of the linear economy, it is not sustainable because it inherently wastes resources that are becoming scarce. Right now, most serious businesspeople think sustainability is in conflict with earning a profit and becoming wealthy. True sustainability, economic sustainability, is exactly the opposite. With this mindset, it becomes strategic to support practices that support a circular economy in the long run.”

The circular economy: Good for business, good for the environment

What if your business practices and operation can help save our planet? Would you do it? Now, what if I said that this one business approach could put $4.5 trillion up for grabs?

By taking a more restorative and regenerative approach, every company can redesign the future of the environment, the economy, and their overall business. “Made possible by the digital economy, forward-thinking businesses are choosing to embrace this value to intentionally reimagine the economy around how we use resources,” observed Wellers. “By slowing down the depletion of resources and possibly even rejuvenating them, early adopters of circular practices have created business models that are profitable, and therefore sustainable. And they are starting to scale.”

In addition to making good financial sense, there’s another reason the circular economy is a sound business practice: Your customers. In his blog 99 Mind-Blowing Ways the Digital Economy Is Changing the Future of Business, Vivek Bapat revealed that 68% of consumers are interested in companies that bring social and environmental change. More important, 84% of global consumers actively seek out socially and environmentally responsible brands and are willing to switch brands associated with those causes.

Five ways your business can take advantage of the circular economy

As the circular economy proves, business and economic growth does not need to happen at the cost of the environment and public health and safety. As everyone searches for an answer to job creation, economic development, and environmental safety, we are in an economic era primed for change.

Wellers states, “Thanks to the exponential growth and power of digital technology, circular business models are becoming profitable. As a result, businesses are scaling their wealth by investing in new economic growth strategies.”

What are these strategies? Here are five business models that can enable companies to unlock the economic benefits of the circular economy, as stated in Accenture’s report Circular Advantage: Innovative Business Models and Technologies that Create Value:

  1. Circular supplies: Deliver fully renewable, recyclable, and biodegradable resource inputs that underpin circular production and consumption systems.
  2. Recovery of resources: Eliminate material leakage and maximize the economic value of product return flows.
  3. Extension of product life: Extend the life cycle of products and assets. Regain the value of your resources by maintaining and improving them by repairing, upgrading, remanufacturing, or remarketing products.
  4. Sharing platforms: Promote a platform for collaboration among product users as individuals or organizations.
  5. Product as a service: Provide an alternative to the traditional model of “buy and own.” Allow products to be shared by many customers through a lease or pay-for-use arrangement.

To learn more about the circular economy, check out Dan Wellers’ blog “4 Ways The Digital Economy Is Circular.”

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How Much Will Digital Cannibalization Eat into Your Business?

Fawn Fitter

Former Cisco CEO John Chambers predicts that 40% of companies will crumble when they fail to complete a successful digital transformation.

These legacy companies may be trying to keep up with insurgent companies that are introducing disruptive technologies, but they’re being held back by the ease of doing business the way they always have – or by how vehemently their customers object to change.

Most organizations today know that they have to embrace innovation. The question is whether they can put a digital business model in place without damaging their existing business so badly that they don’t survive the transition. We gathered a panel of experts to discuss the fine line between disruption and destruction.

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qa_qIn 2011, when Netflix hiked prices and tried to split its streaming and DVD-bymail services, it lost 3.25% of its customer base and 75% of its market capitalization.²︐³ What can we learn from that?

Scott Anthony: That debacle shows that sometimes you can get ahead of your customers. The key is to manage things at the pace of the market, not at your internal speed. You need to know what your customers are looking for and what they’re willing to tolerate. Sometimes companies forget what their customers want and care about, and they try to push things on them before they’re ready.

R. “Ray” Wang: You need to be able to split your traditional business and your growth business so that you can focus on big shifts instead of moving the needle 2%. Netflix was responding to its customers – by deciding not to define its brand too narrowly.

qa_qDoes disruption always involve cannibalizing your own business?

Wang: You can’t design new experiences in existing systems. But you have to make sure you manage the revenue stream on the way down in the old business model while managing the growth of the new one.

Merijn Helle: Traditional brick-and-mortar stores are putting a lot of capital into digital initiatives that aren’t paying enough back yet in the form of online sales, and they’re cannibalizing their profits so they can deliver a single authentic experience. Customers don’t see channels, they see brands; and they want to interact with brands seamlessly in real time, regardless of channel or format.

Lars Bastian: In manufacturing, new technologies aren’t about disrupting your business model as much as they are about expanding it. Think about predictive maintenance, the ability to warn customers when the product they’ve purchased will need service. You’re not going to lose customers by introducing new processes. You have to add these digitized services to remain competitive.

qa_qIs cannibalizing your own business better or worse than losing market share to a more innovative competitor?

Michael Liebhold: You have to create that digital business and mandate it to grow. If you cannibalize the existing business, that’s just the price you have to pay.

Wang: Companies that cannibalize their own businesses are the ones that survive. If you don’t do it, someone else will. What we’re really talking about is “Why do you exist? Why does anyone want to buy from you?”

Anthony: I’m not sure that’s the right question. The fundamental question is what you’re using disruption to do. How do you use it to strengthen what you’re doing today, and what new things does it enable? I think you can get so consumed with all the changes that reconfigure what you’re doing today that you do only that. And if you do only that, your business becomes smaller, less significant, and less interesting.

qa_qSo how should companies think about smart disruption?

Anthony: Leaders have to reconfigure today and imagine tomorrow at the same time. It’s not either/or. Every disruptive threat has an equal, if not greater, opportunity. When disruption strikes, it’s a mistake only to feel the threat to your legacy business. It’s an opportunity to expand into a different marke.

SAP_Disruption_QA_images2400x1600_4Liebhold: It starts at the top. You can’t ask a CEO for an eight-figure budget to upgrade a cloud analytics system if the C-suite doesn’t understand the power of integrating data from across all the legacy systems. So the first task is to educate the senior team so it can approve the budgets.

Scott Underwood: Some of the most interesting questions are internal organizational questions, keeping people from feeling that their livelihoods are in danger or introducing ways to keep them engaged.

Leon Segal: Absolutely. If you want to enter a new market or introduce a new product, there’s a whole chain of stakeholders – including your own employees and the distribution chain. Their experiences are also new. Once you start looking for things that affect their experience, you can’t help doing it. You walk around the office and say, “That doesn’t look right, they don’t look happy. Maybe we should change that around.”

Fawn Fitter is a freelance writer specializing in business and technology. 

To learn more about how to disrupt your business without destroying it, read the in-depth report Digital Disruption: When to Cook the Golden Goose.

Download the PDF (1.2MB)

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How To Answer The Question: “What Is Our Digital Strategy?”

Dany Ortchanian

Anxious boards around the world are asking their CEOs: “What exactly is our digital strategy?”

That has very quickly become the most relevant—and the most loaded—question you’ll hear in pretty much any board meeting. A minority are answering it well, but most are struggling.

All companies feel mounting pressure for a change of business model to keep the business from becoming redundant in the digital economy and to continue growth. They are trying to understand how to change that model in reaction to shifting macroeconomic trends, and unlock opportunities to increase profits, grow the customer base, and become more productive.

The question that perhaps is not being asked as often in boardrooms is: “Will this ever slow down?” In truth, no one knows, but the likelihood is that this constant change and forced business reinvention will continue on a path of relentless acceleration.

Microsoft’s acquisition of LinkedIn last week is a perfect example of the dizzying pace at which businesses are expected to make enormous decisions that will determine their future. Microsoft spent $26BN, a 50% premium, on a company some would argue is on the ropes after a weak Q1.

Microsoft is simply reacting to the pace of change by acting fast, thinking big, and trying to get ahead of the game. It might be comforting, or possibly anxiety-inducing, for boardrooms to know that even a cutting-edge company like Microsoft must to make huge decisions on-the-fly and constantly evolve its business model to keep growing.

The investment is certainly not guaranteed to pay off, but that’s the reality we face in today’s digital world, in which every industry feels the disruption.

Check out these InfoDocs about digital disruption in Canada (in English and French). They spell out, step-by-step, how any business can start tackling its digital strategy.

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Dany Ortchanian

About Dany Ortchanian

Dany Ortchanian is vice president, Eastern Region for SAP Canada. He provides executive support and guidance to enterprises across all industries in eastern Canada, devising strategies that help them get the best out of SAP solutions to achieve business success.

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