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Chief Supply Chain Officer: The Most Transformative Executive In The C-Suite

Hans Thalbauer

Customer experience and omnichannel commerce have been the hot business topics over the past couple of years, and for good reason. Emerging technologies such as mobile and social platforms have changed customer behaviors. They’ve also provided companies with new ways to engage customers.

But mobile and social are only part of the picture, and they take you only so far in becoming truly customer-centric and differentiating yourself in the marketplace. To compete in the digital economy, companies are discovering they must embrace more fundamental change. And to achieve that, they’re renewing their focus on the extended supply chain.

That new scrutiny has raised the profile of supply chain executives. In fact, several prominent companies have tapped people with supply chain experience to lead the enterprise – Apple’s Tim Cook and GM’s Mary Barra being just two examples.

But more organizations are creating a new role: chief supply chain officer (CSCO). The CEO runs the company. The CFO holds the purse strings. But today, the CSCO may be the most important role in the executive suite.

CSCOs for customer-centricity

Consumer products companies were among the first to establish the CSCO role. In part this is because the consumer products industry took the lead in pursuing omnichannel strategies. Retail changed dramatically as consumers embraced online shopping and direct delivery. Consumer products companies needed to retool their supply chains with the speed, visibility, and flexibility necessary to serve multiple channels consistently and effectively.

But the CSCO is strategic to any organization that intends to be customer focused. And increasingly, that’s every manufacturer. In manufacturing and asset-intensive industries, the CSCO is sometimes called the chief operations officer (COO). But whatever you call it, manufacturers need someone in the executive suite who’s responsible for all extended supply chain processes, from product innovation to product delivery.

That level of leadership is necessary as manufacturers grapple with the new drivers of the extended supply chain. Omnichannel strategies make the supply chain more complex. The need to deliver individualized products and become more customer-centric means the supply chain must be faster, smarter, and more flexible.

It’s no longer enough to make incremental improvements. CSCOs must lead the charge to actually transform the supply chain. For example, they need to continuously predict demand and automatically adjust product allocations across every channel. They must integrate warehouse and transportation processes to enable same-day or even one-hour shipments.

Extending the enterprise

But CSCOs aren’t only revolutionizing the supply chain. They’re also transforming the organization and its competitive posture. One key way they’re doing that is by bringing new talent into the enterprise.

First, the new business processes and business models of the digital economy are placing a premium on data analytics. Companies need data scientists who know how to analyze massive amounts of data and interpret the results accurately.

Second, the new emphasis on speed and flexibility creates a need for a larger contingent workforce. Especially in manufacturing and warehousing, organizations will rely on contingent labor to respond to demand fluctuation.

Third, manufacturing and warehousing will rely more and more on automation, especially robotics and the Internet of Things (IoT). While these technologies replace some skills, they call for new capabilities to manage digitized processes.

All these workforce changes begin in manufacturing and logistics, the purview of the CSCO. But they extend throughout the enterprise, placing the CSCO in a position to influence the skillset of the organization overall.

Fundamental drivers such as individualized products and customer-centricity are upending the traditional supply chains. They’re doing the same to the executive suite. A CSCO who knows how to respond can transform not just your supply and demand networks, but your entire company and its competitive position in the marketplace.

For more insight on how digitalization will affect your organization’s business strategies, read the research report by SAP “Digitizing the Extended Supply Chain: How to Survive and Thrive in Today’s Digital Economy” to learn how to be a leader in this digital economy.

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Hans Thalbauer

About Hans Thalbauer

Hans Thalbauer is the Senior Vice President, Extended Supply Chain, at SAP. He is responsible for the strategic direction and the Go-To-Market of solutions for Supply Chain, Logistics, Engineering/R&D, Manufacturing, Asset Management and Sustainability at SAP.

Leveraging Contract Manufacturing Organizations In Life Sciences

Joseph Miles

The 21st century has been a remarkable and volatile time in the life sciences industry.

The onset of the patent cliff in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology sectors set forth a variety of strategies that have quite literally changed the face of the industry. Organizations, in an attempt to recoup the lost revenue and margin from patent expirations on blockbuster products, began acquiring companies at a pace that has never been seen before. What has emerged is a new and more focused industry. Non-strategic divisions where sold off in divestitures and focus areas were expanded with acquisitions that grew their pipeline, markets, and revenues.

In spite of all the M&A activity, the industry continues to explore new ways of improving their operating margins.   Outsourcing of operational processes has continued to increase in importance across the industry as organizations look for ways of reducing operational overhead.

Long used in the medical device and equipment sector, pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies have traditionally had more of an insource approach to manufacturing but that continued to change. Drug companies are not only leveraging contract manufacturing organizations (CMO) for less complex small molecule and active pharmaceutical ingredient production (API) but are now leveraging CMOs for more complex, large molecule products in spite of that manufacturing complexity.

This strategy is not without risk as organizations understand that you can outsource the process but you cannot outsource the accountability for that process. This dramatic transformation of business models, processes, and work strategies are focused on returning to the levels of profitability that had been accomplished earlier in their history.

If that isn’t complicated enough, the industry continues to see the emergence of global regulations that make manufacturing a complicated process to outsource. Global serialization, outlined in my previous blog, “The Rapidly Changing World of Serialization in Life Sciences,” now requires drug manufacturers to include a unique serial number on every vial of product produced. That serial number coordination with the CMO is challenging and is further complicated as the drug manufacturer is required to submit the information to global regulatory agencies who want to track the serial numbers to ensure the integrity of the product and, ultimately, the safety of the patient.

My team is very passionate about our ability to help global pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and medical device companies during these very challenging times. Life sciences companies should consider leveraging a cloud-based approach to direct materials that supports all aspects of direct material procurement. This should include processes to support supplier audits, approved vendor lists, purchase order releases, and blanket purchase orders. The cloud helps organizations reduce their capital expenses while also simplifying the IT support to enable the process.

Life sciences companies should also consider aggressively leveraging CMOs for the manufacturing of their products, even in this highly regulated industry. This would include the medical device and equipment segments that have leveraged CMO strategies for many decades but also drug companies inclusive of the serialized information.

Organizations are not only able to provide the CMO with all of the work orders, manufacturing instructions, routings, and standard operating procedures for regulated manufacturing, but they also have the ability to manage and generate all serial number information that would be applied to every vial of pharmaceutical and/or biotechnology product during the manufacturing process. This information can be delivered through a network that further simplifies the process and improves operational efficiencies, ultimately reducing the total cost of ownership to support the process.

Life sciences companies should not just be content with leveraging the cloud to enable the direct material and contract manufacturing processes for small and large molecule compounds, including serial number support, to meet global regulations. The network can be exploited further in the area of operational quality and production tracking. Manufacturing data, batch reports, quality information, and operational KPIs can be shared across the network to ensure the manufacturers have full visibility and transparency around the outsourced processes. This is highly strategic and reflects the underlying complexity of enabling outsourced manufacturing across all segments of the life sciences industry.

For more on digitalization in the life sciences industry, see Special Compliance Aspects And Quick Wins In The Life Sciences Industry.

 

 

 

 

 

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Joseph Miles

About Joseph Miles

Joseph Miles is Global Vice President pf Life Sciences at SAP. He is passionate about helping organizations improve outcomes for their patients and enable innovation across the health sciences value chain.

5 Supply Chain And Digital Economy Myths Debunked

Richard Howells

The digital economy is presenting businesses with myriad opportunities. But to capitalize on these prospects, companies must be willing to adapt, particularly in regard to how they manage their existing supply chain operations.

While people are finally beginning to recognize the potential benefits that come with the digital economy, too few companies are digitizing their operations in an effort to thrive in this dynamic environment. In fact, according to SAP research, 71% of organizations consider their digital maturity levels to be in the “early” or “developing” stages.

Given that fact, it’s entirely possible that people still don’t fully grasp the importance of transforming their existing business models and processes to succeed in today’s digital economy.

Below are five statements related to the digital economy and supply chain that many people believe to be true – and an explanation on why they are, indeed, false.

Myth #1: Your existing supply chain is sufficient to help you thrive in the digital economy

“To win in the digital economy,” says Hans Thalbauer, senior vice president of extended supply chain at SAP, “we have to reimagine how we design, plan, make, deliver, and operate our products and assets.”

Companies must put themselves in a position to develop environments in which they can access and manage data and processes in real time. This requires transforming your traditional supply chain into a digitized, extended supply chain, one that enables your business to be more connected, intelligent, responsive, and predictive.

By reimagining your existing supply chain, you can deliver superior customer experiences and increase revenue. In fact, companies that adapt to the digital world are 26% more profitable than their industry peers, according to MIT Sloan research.

Myth #2: Customers aren’t willing to pay for better experiences

Today’s customers crave a new type of experience. Omnichannel solutions can provide this, enabling buyers to discover a product online, research it on a mobile device, and purchase it in a retail store.

Given that these capabilities exist, your company needs to ensure it can deliver on the omnichannel fulfillment promise. To achieve this, the different channels must be able to support the development and/or delivery of goods, based on each individual customer’s preferences.

Customers are so eager for a better purchasing experience, 86% of them are willing to pay more money to get it, according to a 2014 American Express and Ebiquity survey.

By reimagining your existing supply chain and transforming it into a digitized, extended supply chain, you can gain the real-time insight you need to enable customer-centric processes and truly satisfy your buyers.

Myth #3: Customers love mass-produced products

Each and every one of your customers is wholly unique. So it’s no surprise that buyers are increasingly seeking out products that are customized to their individual preferences and needs.

Forty-two percent of consumers are interested in technology to customize and personalize products, and 19% are willing to pay a 10% price premium to individualize products, according to a Deloitte research study.

This growing demand for product customization is challenging companies considerably. Traditionally, supply chain organizations merely had to manufacture and/or ship full pallets of identical goods. Now, they’re tasked with delivering a lot size of one.

To support your customers’ growing desire for individualized products, your business must transform how it designs, produces, and delivers goods and services. It must embrace the latest technologies, harnessing the power of the Internet of Things (IoT), 3D printing, and other cutting-edge innovations.

By adopting a digital supply chain and smart manufacturing techniques, you can enable greater connectivity, responsiveness, agility, and reliability, empowering you to better meet your customers’ demands for individualized products.

Myth #4: Businesses can’t benefit from the sharing economy

The sharing economy revolves around the sharing of human and physical resources. Generally, consumers love it. Businesses, on the other hand, view it with great skepticism, wondering how it can actually benefit their companies.

At the heart of the sharing economy lies connectivity. When everything is connected, you can collaborate like never before.

Through the sharing economy, you can better link your organization with manufacturers, logistics service providers, and other partners. This larger business network enables companies to capitalize on their partners’ resources, expand their reach, innovate, and improve customer service.

Taking full advantage of a connected enterprise of companies requires putting an extended supply chain at the core of your operations. This allows you to have greater visibility into various customer, supplier, manufacturer, and other insights, ensuring you can improve decision making and respond to in-the-moment changes and demands.

Networked businesses, according to McKinsey & Company, are 50% more likely than their peers to be market leaders.

Myth #5: You simply cannot overcome resource scarcity

Resources are declining globally. Raw materials such as water, minerals, oil, and gas are becoming increasingly difficult to obtain. Human talent is also growing scarcer, as employees lack the requisite skills to manage the data that comes with running digitized, extended supply chains.

Today’s organizations need to begin building sustainability into their business processes. From a talent perspective, companies can achieve this a number of ways, from deploying a contingent labor force to replacing certain roles with robotics. To combat resource scarcity, manufacturers must start doing more with less, leveraging alternate sources of energy and reused or recycled materials.

Finally, another key to ensuring your organization is run in a sustainable manner is to emphasize safety and risk management. Protecting your staff from harm and your resources from damage go hand in hand with your company’s long-term success.

The truth about prospering in today’s complex digital economy

Now that you’ve read a few myths about the digital economy and supply chain, here’s an undeniable truth: Digital transformation is the only tried-and-true way to survive and thrive in today’s dynamic new environment.

Whether providing a superior customer experience, delivering the individualized products your buyers yearn for, or overcoming resource scarcity, only digitization can ensure you possess the capabilities necessary to realize your greatest business goals.

Download this free white paper, Digitizing the Extended Supply Chain, to further explore how your enterprise can combat complexity and accelerate growth in today’s complex digital economy.

This blog was originally published on SCW Magazine

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Richard Howells

About Richard Howells

Richard Howells is a Vice President at SAP responsible for the positioning, messaging, AR , PR and go-to market activities for the SAP Supply Chain solutions.

Is Personalization Killing Your Relationships With Customers?

Christopher Koch

 

Customers Want Personalization…

 

Customers expect a coordinated, personalized response across all channels. For example, 91% expect to pick up where they left off when they switch channels.

Source: “Omni-Channel Service Doesn’t Measure Up; Customers Are Tired of Playing Games” (Aspect Blog, January 29, 2014)

laptop_phone

 


 

… And they Want it Now

 

Customers also want their interactions to be live – or in the moment they choose. For example, nearly 60% of consumers want real-time promotions and 48% like online reminders to order items that they might have run out of.

realtime

That means companies need to become a Live Business – a business that can coordinate multiple functions in order to respond to and even anticipate customer demand at any moment.

Source: “U.S. Consumers Want More Personalized Retail Experience and Control Over Personal Information, Accenture Survey Shows” (Accenture, March 9, 2015)

 


 

But There’s a Catch: Trust

 

73percent

Customers are demanding more intimacy, but there’s only so far companies can go before they cross over the line to creepy. For example, facial-recognition technology that identifies age and gender to target advertisements on digital screens is considered creepy by 73% of people surveyed.

Source: “In-Store Personalization: Creepy or Cool?” (RichRelevance, 2015)

 


 

How to Earn Their Trust and Keep It

 

Here are some ways to improve trust while moving forward with omnichannel personalization.

trustfall

1-01

Customers Want Value for Their Data

An Accenture study found that the majority of consumers in the United States and the United Kingdom are willing to allow trusted retailers to use some of their personal data in order to present personalized and targeted products, services, recommendations, and offers.

Source: “U.S. Consumers Want More Personalized Retail Experience and Control Over Personal Information, Accenture Survey Shows” (Accenture, March 9, 2015)

 

2-01

Don’t Take Data, Let Customers Offer It

Customers who voluntarily provide data are less likely to be annoyed by personalization that’s built around it. Mobile apps are a great way to invite customers to share more data in a relationship that they control.

 

3-01

Be Clear About How You Will Use Data

Companies should think about the customer data transaction – such as what information the customer is giving them, how it’s being used, and what the result will be – and describe it as simply as possible.

 


 

download arrowTo learn more about how to personalize without destroying trust, read the in-depth report Live Businesses Deliver a Personal Customer Experience Without Losing Trust.

 

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Christopher Koch

About Christopher Koch

Christopher Koch is the Editorial Director of the SAP Center for Business Insight. He is an experienced publishing professional, researcher, editor, and writer in business, technology, and B2B marketing. Share your thoughts with Chris on Twitter @Ckochster.

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Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Stephan Gatien

About Stephan Gatien

Stephan Gatien is global head of Telecommunications for SAP. He is responsible for the company's vision and strategy in the telecommunications industry, overseeing product and solution management activities and working with product development teams to ensure that SAP products support the unique needs of telcos.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Andre Smith

About Andre Smith

An Internet, Marketing and E-Commerce specialist with several years of experience in the industry. He has watched as the world of online business has grown and adapted to new technologies, and he has made it his mission to help keep businesses informed and up to date.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Mike Jones

About Mike Jones

Mike Jones is an expert writer dedicated to learn as much as he can about the business world while keeping focus on his main interest: natural healthcare remedies. He shares his conclusions and work here as often as he can.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Michael Brenner

About Michael Brenner

Michael Brenner is a globally-recognized keynote speaker, author of  The Content Formula and the CEO of Marketing Insider GroupHe has worked in leadership positions in sales and marketing for global brands like SAP and Nielsen, as well as for thriving startups. Today, Michael shares his passion on leadership and marketing strategies that deliver customer value and business impact. He is recognized by the Huffington Post as a Top Business Keynote Speaker and   a top  CMO influencer by Forbes.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Adam Winfield

About Adam Winfield

Adam Winfield writes about technology, how it's affecting industries, how it's affecting businesses, and how it's affecting people.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness