One Platform Has Already Won The 2016 Elections: Mobile

Reuters Content Solutions

When Barack Obama ran for president in 2008, Scott Goodstein made sure the Obama for America campaign was the first to have its own mobile app, text-messaging program and ringtone-and-wallpaper marketing effort.

It all sounds a little quaint today. The Blackberrys and flip phones of that era are all but gone. “Everyone and his brother has some kind of smartphone with access to the mobile Web, and people are comfortable with donations via mobile,” says Goodstein, founder and CEO of Revolution Messaging, who has spent the past decade managing digital strategy and technology for political campaigns.

In 2016, mobile has taken the lead in elections strategy. It’s how voters get their news and information. It’s how they engage with social media. It’s how they donate money and time. In many states, it’s even how they register to vote. And in a year when campaigns have gone 24/7, mobile technology is a critical enabler.

“Mobile, in terms of ubiquitous use, was very new in 2012,” says Tucker Bounds, president of the text-based political-analysis platform Sidewire, who worked on the campaigns of John McCain in 2008 and Meg Whitman in 2010. “Four years later, products and behaviors have matured to the point where the presidential election is truly happening on mobile devices—whether it’s highly targeted mobile ads, candidates participating in the news cycle in real time on their phones or the emergence of entirely new media types.”

Typically new technology emerges in one presidential election cycle and becomes dominant in the next, says Andrew Lipsman, vice president of marketing and insights at comScore. “In 2004, Howard Dean was the first candidate to collect meaningful online donations, and in 2008 e-commerce became a huge part of the Obama fundraising platform. Social media emerged in 2008, and by 2012 [it] became hugely influential in how candidates gathered and messaged to their audiences,”says Lipsman. “In 2012, mobile first became an important piece of technology for campaigns, and in 2016 it is the dominant technology.”

Campaigns must reach voters where they are, and today that’s on their mobile devices. “In terms of getting your message out there, the majority of digital media time is spent on a mobile phone,” says Lipsman. “That’s where the eyeballs are.”

A recent survey by the Interactive Advertising Bureau found that digital media has reached parity with TV among registered U.S. voters as a primary information source about presidential candidates (61 percent for both digital and TV) and about political issues (67 percent for digital vs. 69 percent for TV).

What’s more, mobile is the only way to reach some key demographics this election cycle. “The Hispanic electorate, and more specifically Hispanic millennials, are the most likely of any demographic to be mobile-only Internet users,” says Lipsman. “The Hispanic influence on the election is likely to be bigger than it has ever been, so you can’t underestimate the importance of mobile.” More than two thirds of Hispanic voters and 60 percent of African-American voters visit political sites on a mobile device as opposed to 49 percent of voters overall, according to the IAB survey, and Hispanic voters are significantly more likely to take an action after viewing a digital or mobile ad for a candidate, with 87 percent of them saying they have done so. The IAB also notes that those individuals who consume political information on mobile devices are younger and more likely to vote.

“Presidential election years have a great percentage of young voters and voters of color participating. Those communities are mobile-heavy, so cracking that nut is crucial,”says Larry Huynh, partner with the digital agency Trilogy Interactive, which worked on the 2012 Elizabeth Warren campaign and is currently working on marijuana legalization in California. “If you’re trying to reach millennials and people of color, particularly if you’re a down-ballot campaign and don’t have a gazillion dollars to spend on TV—which is probably not the best way to reach them anyway—you ought to be thinking about how to reach them via mobile.”

Choosing mobile ads over TV spots—especially in markets where television time is pricey—is almost a no-brainer for Congressional races, Goodstein says, since half the TV audience may not even be in the candidate’s district. “Digital makes a whole lot of sense and mobile even more.”

Campaigns are also harnessing mobile technology in the field with apps that give managers real-time oversight of their operations and enable more seamless data sharing and collection. “The use of mobile to more effectively help people canvass is a big change this year,” says Huynh. “It reduces friction by putting data in the hands of canvassers to make the whole process more efficient.”

The 2016 Bernie Sanders campaign proved to be an early adopter of some emerging mobile capabilities, like the Hustle app, which enabled his supporters to initiate and then manage a large volume of text-message conversations. The Sanders team also created a rapid-response digital program to capitalize on key events in real time. When the candidate stated in a debate that people were sick of hearing about Hilary Clinton’s “damn e-mails,” the Sanders campaign had sent out a text to supporters before the candidates left the podium. “They were able to make $3 million thanks to that rapid response and being able to move to audience in the moment,” says Goodstein.

Mobile could also prove to be a powerful get-out-the-vote tool on Election Day. “You could argue that [the 24/7 news cycle] has created a more polarized environment and [that] a smaller and smaller portion of voters that are truly persuadable,” says Lipsman. That may make texting and other mobile approaches even more important in November, he says. “Campaigns can send out targeted messages to spur them to actually vote.”

This election cycle, “every political campaign that’s smart has a mobile-optimized website that can take signups or contributions via mobile,” says Goodstein, whose company this year introduced text-to-donate technology. But campaigns can take their mobile approaches a step further and think about how to provide an end-to-end mobile experience for voters, he adds—connecting them from a mobile ad to their mobile calendar to insert an event reminder or to the candidate’s app, where the individual can sign up to volunteer or to a phone bank to canvass for the candidate. “You can take that mobile army and turn them into mobile activists,” says Goodstein. “It’s not just a mobile ad-unit buy, but a mobile ad connected to a phone which is connected to a human being in a real way.”

Elections, Bounds says, are great incubators for new communication tools. “Because campaigns set up shop and grow so quickly and their window of existence is just two years, they’re focused on speed and experimentation,” he says. “They’re trying everything they can to win at the margins. They move quickly and experiment with new technology because it’s life or death.”

The returns on these mobile investments won’t be clear until November. “It will be interesting to see whether the campaigns were actually able to use these tools to reach folks more efficiently. Did they get better data as a result? Did they get more voters to the polls? How did mobile improve field operations,” asks Huynh. “We won’t know until after the election.”

Digital transformation will continue to help elections run simple. Learn what running simple could mean for your business.

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A Modern Outlook On ERP Brings New Opportunities To Professional Services

Catherine Lynch

Part 5 of the “Intelligent ERP-Driven Industries” series

Businesses that fall under the professional services industry umbrella represent a diverse ecosystem and variety of daily challenges. But some central truths also unite them, including the need to attract and engage clients that increasingly demand the convenience and ease of today’s digital experiences.

As emerging technologies, such as artificial intelligence, machine learning, and blockchain, begin to shake up traditional practices, professional services firms are addressing client demands by rapidly developing new business models, including:

  • Outcome-based engagements: Customers pay for an outcome, not the work done to achieve it. Although the burdens of responsibility and risk are significant, businesses stand to gain more opportunity and higher profit margins if the customer’s request is delivered efficiently.
  • Increased use of talent networks: Greater reliance on contingent expertise and remote talent provides an effective staffing strategy from inside the company and across organizational boundaries. Work assignments flow through a lifecycle that includes financial processes such as payables, client billing, intercompany billing, and receivables.
  • Productization of services: As part of delivering projects efficiently, standardization of efforts and knowledge is prioritized when possible, leading to the automation of some processes.
  • Digital services delivery: Industry lines are blurring as many traditional consulting firms are offering digital services to clients and as some cloud services providers cater to the needs of professional services organizations.
  • Uberisation of services: Pockets of startups, such as legal firms, are kickstarting a wave of disruption by using artificial intelligence to automate many of the mundane, repetitive tasks previously done by young associates.

Although these emerging business models provide a variety of transformative opportunities, professional services firms are still constrained by their legacy ERP environments that, at the core, manage financials and related service delivery processes. As a result, firms cannot provide the level of real-time visibility, responsiveness, and flexibility needed to innovate and integrate new processes and offerings with the customer engagement experience.

Intelligent, cloud-based ERP unlocks constraints that hold firms back

As a first step towards digitalization, professional services firms should consider adopting an intelligent, cloud-based ERP platform as the digital core of their IT landscape. As the nerve center of the entire company, it provides everything needed to run as a real-time digital business – from end-to-end project management and workforce development to cash flow and expense processes.

By implementing a rock-solid, intelligent digital core to manage every aspect of the business, professional services firms can differentiate themselves with:

  • A real-time foundation: Built on a database designed to take advantage of the latest data-processing technology, a cloud ERP platform brings immediate transparency into real-time information. For example, by empowering organizations to confirm the time and expense dedicated towards a customer engagement, business leadership can fully understand project cost, revenue, margin, and work-in-progress position. Meanwhile, the financial controller can run a soft close that uses the same data. In essence, every decision maker can ask a question and find the answer with in-the-moment data made available immediately in the user experience.
  • An intelligent core: In the cloud, the business can take advantage of new digital technologies such as machine learning, predictive analytics, blockchain, and natural language processes by building them into the ERP platform quickly and easily.
  • A set of proven industry best practices: To make the best use of an intelligent ERP platform, firms can take advantage of end-to-end professional services processes and embedded best practices that can be applied as a fundamental part of the overall business system. They can, for example, create new projects quickly from templates to better standardize services or from scratch to offer unique and differentiated services.
  • A platform for continuous innovation: Since the technology is upgraded automatically on a quarterly basis, even the smallest firms can access the latest technology and capabilities to innovate new business models and increase process automation without disrupting core activities.

Accelerating growth while safeguarding against disruption

Professional services firms – regardless of size – are prone to disruption from their rivals and clients as long as digitalization is a mainstay in the global marketplace. By implementing an intelligent, cloud-based ERP system, businesses can help ensure that every function has the information and perspective it needs to accomplish ambitions for growth and optimized operations.

Check out how professional service providers are deepening their digital transformation with a next-generation ERP suite serving as a digital core. Access our library of keynote and session replays from the Intelligent ERP Industry Virtual Summit to hear from top customers and experts as they discuss how intelligent ERP, industry roadmaps, and implementation can guide your business throughout its digital journey.

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Catherine Lynch

About Catherine Lynch

Catherine Lynch is a Senior Director of Industry Cloud Marketing at SAP. She is a content marketing specialist with a particular focus on the professional services and media industries globally. Catherine has a wide international experience of working with enterprise application vendors in global roles, creating thought leadership and is a social media practitioner.

Purpose Matters When Building Your Long-Game Digital Strategy

Paul Kurchina

Digital transformation. It’s at the top of every boardroom agenda, prompting much debate over data management, analytics-driven decision-making, personalized user experiences, and automation. Yet, for most executives, the primary purpose and end goal of such initiatives remain, at best, fuzzy.

Rapid, proactive response to changing data, competitive conditions, and customer behaviors is undoubtedly a necessity for surviving in this increasingly hyperconnected and hypercompetitive world. However, according to Jeff Stier, co-founder of the Global EY Sinek Performance Practice for EY, businesses must do more to produce purposeful outcomes that drive life-sustaining change to everyone on our planet.

“Digitalization promises to help organizations do things well over and over again without human intervention. At the same time, we must reflect on what humans can do better. What important role will employees, partners, suppliers, and customers play in this new digital world?” said Stier during the Americas’ SAP Users’ Group (ASUG) Webcast “The Art & Science of Accelerating a Digital Transformation … with Purpose.

Why is Stier’s question relevant to your business? Simply put, your answers can mean the difference between building a revenue generator for a couple years and offering a clean, equitable, and prosperous future that outlasts us all.

Purpose sets the foundation for infinite and impactful change

Traditional change strategies have enabled businesses to acquire the skills and create the processes needed to successfully execute a digital initiative, such as implementing a new ERP system. But what companies often miss is the one thing that can turn that project into a real digital transformation: people who understand the purpose of the change and are motivated to take action and achieve desirable results.

“Short- and long-term value from any business change is accelerated by integrating purpose and motivation with traditional strategies for digital transformation,” Stier advised. “Similar to the double-helix structure of DNA, digital transformation strategies and purpose and motivation strategies must zip tightly with each other – with digital strategies running through the middle to guide innovation, inspiration, and strategic engagement toward desirable business outcomes.”

Maintaining a perfect union of motivation and purpose with digital transformation enables your company to gain a return of sustainable growth across the spectrum of the business network:

  • Inside-out: Trust in the employee relationship increases because the digital initiative delivered what business leadership promised. The workplace culture gradually embraces the change, leading to high-performing teams, better employee engagement, and continuous innovation.
  • Outside-in: Customers begin to trust your brand more now that the digital experience matches their wants, needs, and expectations. Over time, their loyalty and retention grow, while customers decide to advocate your products and services. Plus, your ties with the customer community strengthen and your sales revenue and margins significantly improve.

By combining motivation and purpose with digital transformation and digital strategies, your business can tap into the best of our human nature to move forward.

“Science tells us that we all want to be inspired, trusted, valued, and fulfilled in everything we do,” said Stier. “Leaders, organizations, and businesses that operate with an infinite mindset are always looking to optimize their motivation and purpose strategies as they understand how human beings react to the way they treat them, communicate to them, and interact with them. And ultimately, the business becomes a brand that is beloved by employees and customers alike.”

Reframe your digital transformation into an inspiring social movement of change that impacts generations to come. Get the best practices and insights you need to get started by listening to the Americas’ SAP Users’ Group (ASUG) Webcast replay “The Art & Science of Accelerating a Digital Transformation … with Purpose,” featuring Jeff Stier, co-founder of Global EY Sinek Performance Practice, EY.

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Paul Kurchina

About Paul Kurchina

Paul Kurchina is a community builder and evangelist with the Americas’ SAP Users Group (ASUG), responsible for developing a change management program for ASUG members.

Hack the CIO

By Thomas Saueressig, Timo Elliott, Sam Yen, and Bennett Voyles

For nerds, the weeks right before finals are a Cinderella moment. Suddenly they’re stars. Pocket protectors are fashionable; people find their jokes a whole lot funnier; Dungeons & Dragons sounds cool.

Many CIOs are enjoying this kind of moment now, as companies everywhere face the business equivalent of a final exam for a vital class they have managed to mostly avoid so far: digital transformation.

But as always, there is a limit to nerdy magic. No matter how helpful CIOs try to be, their classmates still won’t pass if they don’t learn the material. With IT increasingly central to every business—from the customer experience to the offering to the business model itself—we all need to start thinking like CIOs.

Pass the digital transformation exam, and you probably have a bright future ahead. A recent SAP-Oxford Economics study of 3,100 organizations in a variety of industries across 17 countries found that the companies that have taken the lead in digital transformation earn higher profits and revenues and have more competitive differentiation than their peers. They also expect 23% more revenue growth from their digital initiatives over the next two years—an estimate 2.5 to 4 times larger than the average company’s.

But the market is grading on a steep curve: this same SAP-Oxford study found that only 3% have completed some degree of digital transformation across their organization. Other surveys also suggest that most companies won’t be graduating anytime soon: in one recent survey of 450 heads of digital transformation for enterprises in the United States, United Kingdom, France, and Germany by technology company Couchbase, 90% agreed that most digital projects fail to meet expectations and deliver only incremental improvements. Worse: over half (54%) believe that organizations that don’t succeed with their transformation project will fail or be absorbed by a savvier competitor within four years.

Companies that are making the grade understand that unlike earlier technical advances, digital transformation doesn’t just support the business, it’s the future of the business. That’s why 60% of digital leading companies have entrusted the leadership of their transformation to their CIO, and that’s why experts say businesspeople must do more than have a vague understanding of the technology. They must also master a way of thinking and looking at business challenges that is unfamiliar to most people outside the IT department.

In other words, if you don’t think like a CIO yet, now is a very good time to learn.

However, given that you probably don’t have a spare 15 years to learn what your CIO knows, we asked the experts what makes CIO thinking distinctive. Here are the top eight mind hacks.

1. Think in Systems

A lot of businesspeople are used to seeing their organization as a series of loosely joined silos. But in the world of digital business, everything is part of a larger system.

CIOs have known for a long time that smart processes win. Whether they were installing enterprise resource planning systems or working with the business to imagine the customer’s journey, they always had to think in holistic ways that crossed traditional departmental, functional, and operational boundaries.

Unlike other business leaders, CIOs spend their careers looking across systems. Why did our supply chain go down? How can we support this new business initiative beyond a single department or function? Now supported by end-to-end process methodologies such as design thinking, good CIOs have developed a way of looking at the company that can lead to radical simplifications that can reduce cost and improve performance at the same time.

They are also used to thinking beyond temporal boundaries. “This idea that the power of technology doubles every two years means that as you’re planning ahead you can’t think in terms of a linear process, you have to think in terms of huge jumps,” says Jay Ferro, CIO of TransPerfect, a New York–based global translation firm.

No wonder the SAP-Oxford transformation study found that one of the values transformational leaders shared was a tendency to look beyond silos and view the digital transformation as a company-wide initiative.

This will come in handy because in digital transformation, not only do business processes evolve but the company’s entire value proposition changes, says Jeanne Ross, principal research scientist at the Center for Information Systems Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). “It either already has or it’s going to, because digital technologies make things possible that weren’t possible before,” she explains.

2. Work in Diverse Teams

When it comes to large projects, CIOs have always needed input from a diverse collection of businesspeople to be successful. The best have developed ways to convince and cajole reluctant participants to come to the table. They seek out technology enthusiasts in the business and those who are respected by their peers to help build passion and commitment among the halfhearted.

Digital transformation amps up the urgency for building diverse teams even further. “A small, focused group simply won’t have the same breadth of perspective as a team that includes a salesperson and a service person and a development person, as well as an IT person,” says Ross.

At Lenovo, the global technology giant, many of these cross-functional teams become so used to working together that it’s hard to tell where each member originally belonged: “You can’t tell who is business or IT; you can’t tell who is product, IT, or design,” says the company’s CIO, Arthur Hu.

One interesting corollary of this trend toward broader teamwork is that talent is a priority among digital leaders: they spend more on training their employees and partners than ordinary companies, as well as on hiring the people they need, according to the SAP-Oxford Economics survey. They’re also already being rewarded for their faith in their teams: 71% of leaders say that their successful digital transformation has made it easier for them to attract and retain talent, and 64% say that their employees are now more engaged than they were before the transformation.

3. Become a Consultant

Good CIOs have long needed to be internal consultants to the business. Ever since technology moved out of the glasshouse and onto employees’ desks, CIOs have not only needed a deep understanding of the goals of a given project but also to make sure that the project didn’t stray from those goals, even after the businesspeople who had ordered the project went back to their day jobs. “Businesspeople didn’t really need to get into the details of what IT was really doing,” recalls Ferro. “They just had a set of demands and said, ‘Hey, IT, go do that.’”

Now software has become so integral to the business that nobody can afford to walk away. Businesspeople must join the ranks of the IT consultants.

But that was then. Now software has become so integral to the business that nobody can afford to walk away. Businesspeople must join the ranks of the IT consultants. “If you’re building a house, you don’t just disappear for six months and come back and go, ‘Oh, it looks pretty good,’” says Ferro. “You’re on that work site constantly and all of a sudden you’re looking at something, going, ‘Well, that looked really good on the blueprint, not sure it makes sense in reality. Let’s move that over six feet.’ Or, ‘I don’t know if I like that anymore.’ It’s really not much different in application development or for IT or technical projects, where on paper it looked really good and three weeks in, in that second sprint, you’re going, ‘Oh, now that I look at it, that’s really stupid.’”

4. Learn Horizontal Leadership

CIOs have always needed the ability to educate and influence other leaders that they don’t directly control. For major IT projects to be successful, they need other leaders to contribute budget, time, and resources from multiple areas of the business.

It’s a kind of horizontal leadership that will become critical for businesspeople to acquire in digital transformation. “The leadership role becomes one much more of coaching others across the organization—encouraging people to be creative, making sure everybody knows how to use data well,” Ross says.

In this team-based environment, having all the answers becomes less important. “It used to be that the best business executives and leaders had the best answers. Today that is no longer the case,” observes Gary Cokins, a technology consultant who focuses on analytics-based performance management. “Increasingly, it’s the executives and leaders who ask the best questions. There is too much volatility and uncertainty for them to rely on their intuition or past experiences.”

Many experts expect this trend to continue as the confluence of automation and data keeps chipping away at the organizational pyramid. “Hierarchical, command-and-control leadership will become obsolete,” says Edward Hess, professor of business administration and Batten executive-in-residence at the Darden School of Business at the University of Virginia. “Flatter, distributive leadership via teams will become the dominant structure.”

5. Understand Process Design

When business processes were simpler, IT could analyze the process and improve it without input from the business. But today many processes are triggered on the fly by the customer, making a seamless customer experience more difficult to build without the benefit of a larger, multifunctional team. In a highly digitalized organization like Amazon, which releases thousands of new software programs each year, IT can no longer do it all.

While businesspeople aren’t expected to start coding, their involvement in process design is crucial. One of the techniques that many organizations have adopted to help IT and businesspeople visualize business processes together is design thinking (for more on design thinking techniques, see “A Cult of Creation“).

Customers aren’t the only ones who benefit from better processes. Among the 100 companies the SAP-Oxford Economics researchers have identified as digital leaders, two-thirds say that they are making their employees’ lives easier by eliminating process roadblocks that interfere with their ability to do their jobs. Ninety percent of leaders surveyed expect to see value from these projects in the next two years alone.

6. Learn to Keep Learning

The ability to learn and keep learning has been a part of IT from the start. Since the first mainframes in the 1950s, technologists have understood that they need to keep reinventing themselves and their skills to adapt to the changes around them.

Now that’s starting to become part of other job descriptions too. Many companies are investing in teaching their employees new digital skills. One South American auto products company, for example, has created a custom-education institute that trained 20,000 employees and partner-employees in 2016. In addition to training current staff, many leading digital companies are also hiring new employees and creating new roles, such as a chief robotics officer, to support their digital transformation efforts.

Nicolas van Zeebroeck, professor of information systems and digital business innovation at the Solvay Brussels School of Economics and Management at the Free University of Brussels, says that he expects the ability to learn quickly will remain crucial. “If I had to think of one critical skill,” he explains, “I would have to say it’s the ability to learn and keep learning—the ability to challenge the status quo and question what you take for granted.”

7. Fail Smarter

Traditionally, CIOs tended to be good at thinking through tests that would allow the company to experiment with new technology without risking the entire network.

This is another unfamiliar skill that smart managers are trying to pick up. “There’s a lot of trial and error in the best companies right now,” notes MIT’s Ross. But there’s a catch, she adds. “Most companies aren’t designed for trial and error—they’re trying to avoid an error,” she says.

To learn how to do it better, take your lead from IT, where many people have already learned to work in small, innovative teams that use agile development principles, advises Ross.

For example, business managers must learn how to think in terms of a minimum viable product: build a simple version of what you have in mind, test it, and if it works start building. You don’t build the whole thing at once anymore.… It’s really important to build things incrementally,” Ross says.

Flexibility and the ability to capitalize on accidental discoveries during experimentation are more important than having a concrete project plan, says Ross. At Spotify, the music service, and CarMax, the used-car retailer, change is driven not from the center but from small teams that have developed something new. “The thing you have to get comfortable with is not having the formalized plan that we would have traditionally relied on, because as soon as you insist on that, you limit your ability to keep learning,” Ross warns.

8. Understand the True Cost—and Speed—of Data

Gut instincts have never had much to do with being a CIO; now they should have less to do with being an ordinary manager as well, as data becomes more important.

As part of that calculation, businesspeople must have the ability to analyze the value of the data that they seek. “You’ll need to apply a pinch of knowledge salt to your data,” advises Solvay’s van Zeebroeck. “What really matters is the ability not just to tap into data but to see what is behind the data. Is it a fair representation? Is it impartial?”

Increasingly, businesspeople will need to do their analysis in real time, just as CIOs have always had to manage live systems and processes. Moving toward real-time reports and away from paper-based decisions increases accuracy and effectiveness—and leaves less time for long meetings and PowerPoint presentations (let us all rejoice).

Not Every CIO Is Ready

Of course, not all CIOs are ready for these changes. Just as high school has a lot of false positives—genius nerds who turn out to be merely nearsighted—so there are many CIOs who aren’t good role models for transformation.

Success as a CIO these days requires more than delivering near-perfect uptime, says Lenovo’s Hu. You need to be able to understand the business as well. Some CIOs simply don’t have all the business skills that are needed to succeed in the transformation. Others lack the internal clout: a 2016 KPMG study found that only 34% of CIOs report directly to the CEO.

This lack of a strategic perspective is holding back digital transformation at many organizations. They approach digital transformation as a cool, one-off project: we’re going to put this new mobile app in place and we’re done. But that’s not a systematic approach; it’s an island of innovation that doesn’t join up with the other islands of innovation. In the longer term, this kind of development creates more problems than it fixes.

Such organizations are not building in the capacity for change; they’re trying to get away with just doing it once rather than thinking about how they’re going to use digitalization as a means to constantly experiment and become a better company over the long term.

As a result, in some companies, the most interesting tech developments are happening despite IT, not because of it. “There’s an alarming digital divide within many companies. Marketers are developing nimble software to give customers an engaging, personalized experience, while IT departments remain focused on the legacy infrastructure. The front and back ends aren’t working together, resulting in appealing web sites and apps that don’t quite deliver,” writes George Colony, founder, chairman, and CEO of Forrester Research, in the MIT Sloan Management Review.

Thanks to cloud computing and easier development tools, many departments are developing on their own, without IT’s support. These days, anybody with a credit card can do it.

Traditionally, IT departments looked askance at these kinds of do-it-yourself shadow IT programs, but that’s changing. Ferro, for one, says that it’s better to look at those teams not as rogue groups but as people who are trying to help. “It’s less about ‘Hey, something’s escaped,’ and more about ‘No, we just actually grew our capacity and grew our ability to innovate,’” he explains.

“I don’t like the term ‘shadow IT,’” agrees Lenovo’s Hu. “I think it’s an artifact of a very traditional CIO team. If you think of it as shadow IT, you’re out of step with reality,” he says.

The reality today is that a company needs both a strong IT department and strong digital capacities outside its IT department. If the relationship is good, the CIO and IT become valuable allies in helping businesspeople add digital capabilities without disrupting or duplicating existing IT infrastructure.

If a company already has strong digital capacities, it should be able to move forward quickly, according to Ross. But many companies are still playing catch-up and aren’t even ready to begin transforming, as the SAP-Oxford Economics survey shows.

For enterprises where business and IT are unable to get their collective act together, Ross predicts that the next few years will be rough. “I think these companies ought to panic,” she says. D!


About the Authors

Thomas Saueressig is Chief Information Officer at SAP.

Timo Elliott is an Innovation Evangelist at SAP.

Sam Yen is Chief Design Officer at SAP and Managing Director of SAP Labs.

Bennett Voyles is a Berlin-based business writer.

Read more thought provoking articles in the latest issue of the Digitalist Magazine, Executive Quarterly.
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Cloud Computing: Separating Myth From Reality

Misa Rawlins and Krishnakant Dave

Across industries, many enterprise leaders believe and understand that cloud computing is here to stay. Globally, public cloud services market revenue is projected to reach US$411 billion by 2020, compared with $260 billion in 2017, according to research firm Gartner, Inc. Cloud technology in all its forms—software, platform, or infrastructure as a service—is rapidly becoming essential to the needs of business today. With cloud computing, organizations can simplify IT, save costs, scale rapidly, drive standardization and user adoption, and start getting ahead of tomorrow’s needs when it comes to customer engagement, the supply chain, the workforce, a simplified finance function, and more.

Despite the short- and long-term advantages, some executives remain uncertain about the next steps or have lingering questions about the benefits of moving to the cloud. For many leaders, separating the cloud myths from the facts can prove daunting. Start here, with these insights that can help you bust big myths about the cloud and start moving confidently toward a cloud-enabled transformation of your organization.

Myth No. 1: Moving to the cloud is too costly. “Costly” is a relative term. The cloud can be costly – but costs should be weighed against benefit and return once requirements and migration plans are in place. Rapidly evolving business demands, for example, can dramatically alter cloud-related requirements. Meanwhile, new technologies are dramatically redefining the art of the possible with the cloud. Because migrating to the cloud is not a true “plug-and-play” proposition, and many enterprise leaders underestimate what a migration or implementation involves, some organizations can be surprised by the costs of a cloud transformation. Without a clear understanding of the potential benefits—without a clear business case for moving to the cloud—the focus on costs can overshadow the return on investment. Knowing the value that cloud solutions can bring—not just the costs—can help manage expectations.

Myth No. 2: The benefits of the cloud aren’t substantial enough. As vendors adopt a “cloud-first” stance for many solutions and product updates, organizations that move to the cloud may have a competitive advantage—no matter the size of the enterprise. Cloud solutions continue to offer abundant and increasing functionality. And with the help of an end-to-end solution provider, you can configure cloud solutions to the specific needs of your industry and your business. For larger organizations, rapidly deployable cloud solutions can help support growth or the unique needs of certain business units, such as new acquisitions or foreign subsidiaries, for example. For smaller organizations, the cloud can help you position your organization to tap new opportunities and tame growth challenges.

Myth No. 3: Cloud is too risky. All digital technologies and all business models come with inherent risk. In a hyperconnected world, no system is immune from cyber attacks, insider threats, data leakage, or related risks. No transformation project is a guaranteed success. Market changes, new competition, regulatory issues, and other factors can require you to change your cloud strategy overnight.

Because the risks are real, take advantage of resources and capabilities that can help reduce risk and ensure that your technology investments align tightly with clear business objectives. The maturity of the software goes a long way toward mitigating risk with cloud projects. You can add an extra layer of capabilities such as managed cloud services to provide active, hands-on oversight of cloud applications and infrastructure—helping you to avoid service interruptions and address issues proactively.

Myth No. 4: Cloud computing is still an immature technology. Like other evolving technologies, cloud is advancing every day. Those who wait for the next generation of cloud offerings may find themselves missing out on tangible benefits as competitors leverage cloud technology to sharpen their edge. Across industries, leading organizations are not waiting. Many view cloud technology as evolving but necessary, and they are leveraging it effectively today. Some, for example, are tightly integrating cloud software solutions to streamline supply chain processes, boost information transparency, and improve decision-making across the board—all the while tapping the cloud benefits of cost savings and scalability. Others are confidently turning to infrastructure solutions delivered and running solutions in a private or hybrid cloud. Still others are turning to cloud platform solutions to extend the power of existing applications, build modern analytics platforms, or support new Internet of Things business models. Turning the cloud to your advantage may depend less on the maturity of the technology and more on the power of your imagination.

Myth No. 5: Moving to the cloud will be easy. Cloud technology can help organizations streamline and simplify their IT landscapes and their business processes, reducing needs around capital expenses and infrastructure while helping to save costs. But migrating to the cloud requires more than simply plugging in technology. It requires an ability to address a host of considerations—data migration, the business-specific capabilities of solutions, change management, governance, systems integration, security, and more.

A cloud transformation is more than a plug-and-play project or a traditional system implementation. It requires progressive thinking and an ability to align technology with your business needs and processes— for today and for the future. Migrating to the cloud is a journey. Moving forward with the cloud will require a vision of your “to be” state—your destination—as well as a strategy for getting you there.

To learn more, and to find out what IDC thinks about the future of the cloud, please read this study that presents a strategic blueprint for enterprises on their digital transformation journey.

For more information on how to simplify innovation with cloud technology, learn more about SAP Cloud Platform.

Ready to reimagine the potential of the cloud? Contact us to get the conversation started.

Contact Krishnakant Dave at kdave@deloitte.com and follow him on Twitter: @kkdave

Contact Misa Rawlins at mrawlins@deloitte.com and follow her on Twitter: @misa_rawlins

www.deloitte.com/SAP

SAP@deloitte.com

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This article originally appeared on Deloitte.com and is republished by permission.

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Misa Rawlins

About Misa Rawlins

As a senior manager and consultant in Deloitte’s SAP practice, Misa Rawlins enjoys helping her clients not only to figure out how to solve their current business problems, but also to envision how a modern cloud platform can transform their organizations moving ahead. Within the practice, she has specifically chosen to take a leadership role around the sales and delivery of SAP S/4HANA Cloud because she considers it the wave of the future. She has made it her mission to deeply understand this technology to better advise clients on what moving to a cloud infrastructure really means.

Krishnakant Dave

About Krishnakant Dave

As a principal in Deloitte’s global SAP practice, KK Dave is a consulting leader for Deloitte’s largest clients; part of the U.S. SAP leadership team where he spearheads Deloitte's cloud offerings; and leader of global go-to-market efforts in the wholesale distribution and manufacturing sector. In these roles, he assists clients in their business transformation journeys using the absolute latest SAP toolset, which presently comprises SAP S/4HANA, SAP Cloud Platform, and SAP S/4HANA Cloud, among other technologies.