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Finding The Humanity In Data: IBM Watson’s CTO Rob High Defines The Emerging Era Of Cognitive Computing [PODCAST]

Hessie Jones

It’s increasingly clear that we, as humans, continuously upload our identities every day. Those needs and propensities become quantified and contextualized. For companies like IBM Watson, understanding the human condition is important so technology can increasingly define patterns, learn, and potentially predict outcomes that benefit both business and industry.

We were pleased to host Rob High, IBM Fellow, vice president and chief technology officer, Watson Solutions, IBM Software Group. In this episode, Rob talks about:

  • The definition of cognitive computing
  • How Watson is aiding the advancement of health care
  • Chef Watson and recommendation on recipes
  • Advanced cognitive systems and how they’re applied across different mediums
  • The future of AI – Should humans be fearful?

You can listen to the podcast here or catch the episode here on Libsyn.

What is cognitive computing?

  • Ultimately, cognitive computing has the greatest benefit for people. By definition, it is the interpretation of the human condition that includes all those things that we take in every day: the information, our communication. It deciphers the intent we derive from them that is meaningful and used in the way we make decisions in our everyday lives.
  • Cognitive computing augments our own human cognition and gives us the insight and inspiration to those specific things we need to know to do our job better.

Classical computing methods have been unable to understand the underlying intent in how we, as humans, have communicated with each other, through voice and text, audible or written.

Cognitive computing does not replace human thinking. It does the research for you so you can do your thinking better.

How is Watson making strides in healthcare?

Watson can operate only in digital form, aggregating the information and looking at discreet elements to explicitly understand the various treatment options to better inform decision making.  Massive amounts of data will uncover trends across the population and yield certain correlations that may help interpret and predict patient response to various treatments.

Through Watson’s work with MD Anderson Cancer Centre, the Oncology Expert Advisor (OEA) was launched.

By pulling together and analyzing vast amounts of information from patient and research databases, the OEA is expected to help our care teams identify and fine-tune the best possible cancer treatments for our patients, while also alerting them to problems that arise during a patient’s care.

In accessing millions of patient records, Watson can aid in identifying a micro-segmentation of the population that have common traits; i.e., exposure to environmental impacts, genetics, heritage, and symptoms. These will aid in surfacing the opportunities to apply the knowledge and understanding to determine how well someone with the same exposure will respond to certain treatments.

While health information across the world has been fragmented, Watson can aid in processing massive quantities of information (not humanly possible) to create implications in a meaningful way, and in a short period of time. Now doctors and patient caregivers who have documented success can share that information with other medical practitioners across the globe to accelerate diagnosis and treatment.

Chef Watson: “Ready to do some cognitive cooking?”

This was for me the most fascinating part of the segment: Chef Watson enables people to make decisions about menus, identifying and helping us discover new recipes based on our unique preferences.

At IBMchefwatson.com,Watson partnered with Bon Appetit, which provided 9000 recipes for Watson to ingest and learn about the different types and styles of recipes. For a computer which innately has no sense of palette or smell, Watson learned about the taste makeup and flavors and the feeling that results when you consume a particular dish. It also learns about the science of taste chemistry and the chemical compounds that give the recipes their specific tastes. From this perspective, it has the ability to begin to imitate the human senses. As per Rob:

Watson starts from scratch, dealing with many – potentially up to a quintillion– combinations of ingredients when it comes up with its unique recommendation every time.

It’s getting at the root of what makes people who they are – the things we experience are interpretable.

As an example, if you wanted a Belgian flavor for a given recipe, Watson will evaluate the different combinations of ingredients that pair well and produce a Belgian flavor, and may come up with different variations.

Starting out as a fun and interesting project, this has occurred as a result of the cognitive ability and has allowed Watson to venture into the art of the possible.

Patterns and the evolution of interpretations

Similar to the learnings with MD Anderson, there are trends or patterns within the data where we can derive the greatest understanding or intention. Overlay contextual history which informs more of the human understanding. Collectively these allow us to extract meaning. Cognitive systems draw meaning that can bring the right set of information to humans and attention to just the right thing(s) to shape the decision-making process.

Pervasive technology has been able to to process 20% of the world’s information until now. The other 80% of that data is the human condition: the spoken word, written word, music, visual representations – all interpretations of our interests and needs. This is the heart of understanding. As Rob points out:

Multi-modal is how we communicate with each other: Not only what you’re hearing, but the intonation in the voice reflects the substance of that expression that’s being conveyed. Add the cadence that punctuates these points and now we know how humans understand each other. The computer needs to understand that as well.

Cognitive systems are not based on the same mathematical models as traditional computers. Attempting to interpret the human condition is doing so in the presence of idiosyncrasies and nuances carried through conversations and other communications.

Our words, our expressions are ambiguous…

Are these models reliable?

There is “no absolute level of correctness necessary;” these results are being applied in the eyes of the beholder. The computer will need to be exposed to enough examples that it will begin to surface patterns of meaning that will allow it to work well in that context. Be prepared for the outcomes to vary by environment or time period or when new variables are introduced.

What is the future of AI? Should we, as humans, be fearful?

The potential of cognitive is vast and in the near future, the amazing strides that are introduced are evidence of the inherent benefit to our human strength and potential.

Technology will continue to progress and there will always be a risk that people and organizations will use it in nefarious ways.

Technology should not be feared. With increased understanding comes progress. It also means humans should be responsible and use it for the purposes for which it was intended.

As this information becomes for common, technology companies need to ensure safeguards are put in place to mitigate abuse to our privacy.

Rob High is an IBM Fellow, vice president and chief technology officer, Watson Solutions, IBM Software Group. He has overall responsibility to drive Watson Solutions technical strategy and thought leadership. As a key member of the Watson Solutions Leadership team, Rob works collaboratively with the Watson engineering, research, and development teams across IBM.

Want more on future tech and its effect on business? See Bring Your Robot To Work.

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Transform Or Die: What Will You Do In The Digital Economy?

Scott Feldman and Puneet Suppal

By now, most executives are keenly aware that the digital economy can be either an opportunity or a threat. The question is not whether they should engage their business in it. Rather, it’s how to unleash the power of digital technology while maintaining a healthy business, leveraging existing IT investments, and innovating without disrupting themselves.

Yet most of those executives are shying away Businesspeople in a Meeting --- Image by © Monalyn Gracia/Corbisfrom such a challenge. According to a recent study by MIT Sloan and Capgemini, only 15% of CEOs are executing a digital strategy, even though 90% agree that the digital economy will impact their industry. As these businesses ignore this reality, early adopters of digital transformation are achieving 9% higher revenue creation, 26% greater impact on profitability, and 12% more market valuation.

Why aren’t more leaders willing to transform their business and seize the opportunity of our hyperconnected world? The answer is as simple as human nature. Innately, humans are uncomfortable with the notion of change. We even find comfort in stability and predictability. Unfortunately, the digital economy is none of these – it’s fast and always evolving.

Digital transformation is no longer an option – it’s the imperative

At this moment, we are witnessing an explosion of connections, data, and innovations. And even though this hyperconnectivity has changed the game, customers are radically changing the rules – demanding simple, seamless, and personalized experiences at every touch point.

Billions of people are using social and digital communities to provide services, share insights, and engage in commerce. All the while, new channels for engaging with customers are created, and new ways for making better use of resources are emerging. It is these communities that allow companies to not only give customers what they want, but also align efforts across the business network to maximize value potential.

To seize the opportunities ahead, businesses must go beyond sensors, Big Data, analytics, and social media. More important, they need to reinvent themselves in a manner that is compatible with an increasingly digital world and its inhabitants (a.k.a. your consumers).

Here are a few companies that understand the importance of digital transformation – and are reaping the rewards:

  1. Under Armour:  No longer is this widely popular athletic brand just selling shoes and apparel. They are connecting 38 million people on a digital platform. By focusing on this services side of the business, Under Armour is poised to become a lifestyle advisor and health consultant, using his product side as the enabler.
  1. Port of Hamburg: Europe’s second-largest port is keeping carrier trucks and ships productive around the clock. By fusing facility, weather, and traffic conditions with vehicle availability and shipment schedules, the Port increased container handling capacity by 178% without expanding its physical space.
  1. Haier Asia: This top-ranking multinational consumer electronics and home appliances company decided to disrupt itself before someone else did. The company used a two-prong approach to digital transformation to create a service-based model to seize the potential of changing consumer behaviors and accelerate product development. 
  1. Uber: This startup darling is more than just a taxi service. It is transforming how urban logistics operates through a technology trifecta: Big Data, cloud, and mobile.
  1. American Society of Clinical Oncologists (ASCO): Even nonprofits can benefit from digital transformation. ASCO is transforming care for cancer patients worldwide by consolidating patient information with its CancerLinQ. By unlocking knowledge and value from the 97% of cancer patients who are not involved in clinical trials, healthcare providers can drive better, more data-driven decision making and outcomes.

It’s time to take action 

During the SAP Executive Technology Summit at SAP TechEd on October 19–20, an elite group of CIOs, CTOs, and corporate executives will gather to discuss the challenges of digital transformation and how they can solve them. With the freedom of open, candid, and interactive discussions led by SAP Board Members and senior technology leadership, delegates will exchange ideas on how to get on the right path while leveraging their existing technology infrastructure.

Stay tuned for exclusive insights from this invitation-only event in our next blog!
Scott Feldman is Global Head of the SAP HANA Customer Community at SAP. Connect with him on Twitter @sfeldman0.

Puneet Suppal drives Solution Strategy and Adoption (Customer Innovation & IoT) at SAP Labs. Connect with him on Twitter @puneetsuppal.

 

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About Scott Feldman and Puneet Suppal

Scott Feldman is the Head of SAP HANA International Customer Community. Puneet Suppal is the Customer Co-Innovation & Solution Adoption Executive at SAP.

What Is Digital Transformation?

Andreas Schmitz

Achieving quantum leaps through disruption and using data in new contexts, in ways designed for more than just Generation Y — indeed, the digital transformation affects us all. It’s time for a detailed look at its key aspects.

Data finding its way into new settings

Archiving all of a company’s internal information until the end of time is generally a good idea, as it gives the boss the security that nothing will be lost. Meanwhile, enabling him or her to create bar graphs and pie charts based on sales trends – preferably in real time, of course – is even better.

But the best scenario of all is when the boss can incorporate data from external sources. All of a sudden, information on factors as seemingly mundane as the weather start helping to improve interpretations of fluctuations in sales and to make precise modifications to the company’s offerings. When the gusts of autumn begin to blow, for example, energy providers scale back solar production and crank up their windmills. Here, external data provides a foundation for processes and decisions that were previously unattainable.

Quantum leaps possible through disruption

While these advancements involve changes in existing workflows, there are also much more radical approaches that eschew conventional structures entirely.

“The aggressive use of data is transforming business models, facilitating new products and services, creating new processes, generating greater utility, and ushering in a new culture of management,” states Professor Walter Brenner of the University of St. Gallen in Switzerland, regarding the effects of digitalization.

Harnessing these benefits requires the application of innovative information and communication technology, especially the kind termed “disruptive.” A complete departure from existing structures may not necessarily be the actual goal, but it can occur as a consequence of this process.

Having had to contend with “only” one new technology at a time in the past, be it PCs, SAP software, SQL databases, or the Internet itself, companies are now facing an array of concurrent topics, such as the Internet of Things, social media, third-generation e-business, and tablets and smartphones. Professor Brenner thus believes that every good — and perhaps disruptive — idea can result in a “quantum leap in terms of data.”

Products and services shaped by customers

It has already been nearly seven years since the release of an app that enables customers to order and pay for taxis. Initially introduced in Berlin, Germany, mytaxi makes it possible to avoid waiting on hold for the next phone representative and pay by credit card while giving drivers greater independence from taxi dispatch centers. In addition, analyses of user data can lead to the creation of new services, such as for people who consistently order taxis at around the same time of day.

“Successful models focus on providing utility to the customer,” Professor Brenner explains. “In the beginning, at least, everything else is secondary.”

In this regard, the private taxi agency Uber is a fair bit more radical. It bypasses the entire taxi industry and hires private individuals interested in making themselves and their vehicles available for rides on the Uber platform. Similarly, Airbnb runs a platform travelers can use to book private accommodations instead of hotel rooms.

Long-established companies are also undergoing profound changes. The German publishing house Axel Springer SE, for instance, has acquired a number of startups, launched an online dating platform, and released an app with which users can collect points at retail. Chairman and CEO Matthias Döpfner also has an interest in getting the company’s newspapers and other periodicals back into the black based on payment models, of course, but these endeavors are somewhat at odds with the traditional notion of publishing houses being involved solely in publishing.

The impact of digitalization transcends Generation Y

Digitalization is effecting changes in nearly every industry. Retailers will likely have no choice but to integrate their sales channels into an omnichannel approach. Seeking to make their data services as attractive as possible, BMW, Mercedes, and Audi have joined forces to purchase the digital map service HERE. Mechanical engineering companies are outfitting their equipment with sensors to reduce downtime and achieve further product improvements.

“The specific potential and risks at hand determine how and by what means each individual company approaches the subject of digitalization,” Professor Brenner reveals. The resulting services will ultimately benefit every customer – not just those belonging to Generation Y, who present a certain basic affinity for digital methods.

“Think of cars that notify the service center when their brakes or drive belts need to be replaced, offer parking assistance, or even handle parking for you,” Brenner offers. “This can be a big help to elderly people in particular.”

Chief digital officers: team members, not miracle workers

Making the transition to the digital future is something that involves not only a CEO or a head of marketing or IT, but the entire company. Though these individuals do play an important role as proponents of digital models, it also takes more than just a chief digital officer alone.

For Professor Brenner, appointing a single person to the board of a DAX company to oversee digitalization is basically absurd. “Unless you’re talking about Da Vinci or Leibnitz born again, nobody could handle such a task,” he states.

In Brenner’s view, this is a topic for each and every department, and responsibilities should be assigned much like on a soccer field: “You’ve got a coach and the players – and the fans, as well, who are more or less what it’s all about.”

Here, the CIO neither competes with the CDO nor assumes an elevated position in the process of digital transformation. Implementing new databases like SAP HANA or Hadoop, leveraging sensor data in both technical and commercially viable ways, these are the tasks CIOs will face going forward.

“There are some fantastic jobs out there,” Brenner affirms.

Want more insight on managing digital transformation? See Three Keys To Winning In A World Of Disruption.

Image via Shutterstock

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Andreas Schmitz

About Andreas Schmitz

Andreas Schmitz is a Freelance Journalist for SAP, covering a wide range of topics from big data to Internet of Things, HR, business innovation and mobile.

How Emotionally Aware Computing Can Bring Happiness to Your Organization

Christopher Koch


Do you feel me?

Just as once-novel voice recognition technology is now a ubiquitous part of human–machine relationships, so too could mood recognition technology (aka “affective computing”) soon pervade digital interactions.

Through the application of machine learning, Big Data inputs, image recognition, sensors, and in some cases robotics, artificially intelligent systems hunt for affective clues: widened eyes, quickened speech, and crossed arms, as well as heart rate or skin changes.




Emotions are big business

The global affective computing market is estimated to grow from just over US$9.3 billion a year in 2015 to more than $42.5 billion by 2020.

Source: “Affective Computing Market 2015 – Technology, Software, Hardware, Vertical, & Regional Forecasts to 2020 for the $42 Billion Industry” (Research and Markets, 2015)

Customer experience is the sweet spot

Forrester found that emotion was the number-one factor in determining customer loyalty in 17 out of the 18 industries it surveyed – far more important than the ease or effectiveness of customers’ interactions with a company.


Source: “You Can’t Afford to Overlook Your Customers’ Emotional Experience” (Forrester, 2015)


Humana gets an emotional clue

Source: “Artificial Intelligence Helps Humana Avoid Call Center Meltdowns” (The Wall Street Journal, October 27, 2016)

Insurer Humana uses artificial intelligence software that can detect conversational cues to guide call-center workers through difficult customer calls. The system recognizes that a steady rise in the pitch of a customer’s voice or instances of agent and customer talking over one another are causes for concern.

The system has led to hard results: Humana says it has seen an 28% improvement in customer satisfaction, a 63% improvement in agent engagement, and a 6% improvement in first-contact resolution.


Spread happiness across the organization

Source: “Happiness and Productivity” (University of Warwick, February 10, 2014)

Employers could monitor employee moods to make organizational adjustments that increase productivity, effectiveness, and satisfaction. Happy employees are around 12% more productive.




Walking on emotional eggshells

Whether customers and employees will be comfortable having their emotions logged and broadcast by companies is an open question. Customers may find some uses of affective computing creepy or, worse, predatory. Be sure to get their permission.


Other limiting factors

The availability of the data required to infer a person’s emotional state is still limited. Further, it can be difficult to capture all the physical cues that may be relevant to an interaction, such as facial expression, tone of voice, or posture.



Get a head start


Discover the data

Companies should determine what inferences about mental states they want the system to make and how accurately those inferences can be made using the inputs available.


Work with IT

Involve IT and engineering groups to figure out the challenges of integrating with existing systems for collecting, assimilating, and analyzing large volumes of emotional data.


Consider the complexity

Some emotions may be more difficult to discern or respond to. Context is also key. An emotionally aware machine would need to respond differently to frustration in a user in an educational setting than to frustration in a user in a vehicle.

 


 

download arrowTo learn more about how affective computing can help your organization, read the feature story Empathy: The Killer App for Artificial Intelligence.


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About Christopher Koch

Christopher Koch is the Editorial Director of the SAP Center for Business Insight. He is an experienced publishing professional, researcher, editor, and writer in business, technology, and B2B marketing. Share your thoughts with Chris on Twitter @Ckochster.

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What Will The Internet Of Things Look Like In 2027? 7 Predictions

Tom Raftery

Recently I was asked: Where do you see the Internet of Things in 10 years?

It is an interesting question to ponder. To frame it properly, it helps to think back to what the world was like 10 years ago and how far we have come since then.
iPhone launch 2007

Ten years ago, in 2007 Apple launched the iPhone. This was the first real smartphone, and it changed completely how we interact with information.

And if you think back to that first iPhone—with its 2.5G connectivity, lack of front-facing camera, and 3.5-inch diagonal 163ppi screen—and compare it to today’s iPhones, that is the level of change we are talking about in 10 years.

In 2027 the term Internet of Things will be redundant. Just as we no longer say Internet-connected smartphone or interactive website because the connectedness and interactivity are now a given, in 10 years all the things will be connected and the term Internet of Things will be superfluous.

While the term may become meaningless, however, that is only because the technologies will be pervasive—and that will change everything.

With significant progress in low-cost connectivity, sensors, cloud-based services, and analytics, in 10 years we will see the following trends and developments:

  • Connected agriculture will move to vertical and in-vitro food production. This will enable higher yields from crops, lower inputs required to produce them, including a significantly reduced land footprint, and the return of unused farmland to increase biodiversity and carbon sequestration in forests
  • Connected transportation will enable tremendous efficiencies and safety improvements as we transition to predictive maintenance of transportation fleets, vehicles become autonomous and vehicle-to-vehicle communication protocols become the norm, and insurance premiums start to favor autonomous driving modes (Tesla cars have 40% fewer crashes when in autopilot mode, according to the NHTSA)
  • Connected healthcare will move from reactive to predictive, with sensors alerting patients and providers of irregularities before significant incidents occur, and the ability to schedule and 3D-print “spare parts”
  • Connected manufacturing will transition to manufacturing as a service, with distributed manufacturing (3D printing) enabling mass customization, with batch sizes of one very much the norm
  • Connected energy, with the sources of demand able to “listen” to supply signals from generators, will move to a system in which demand more closely matches supply (with cheaper storage, low carbon generation, and end-to-end connectivity). This will stabilise the the grid and eliminate the fluctuations introduced by increasing the percentage of variable generators (such as solar and wind) in the system, thereby reducing electricity generation’s carbon footprint
  • Human-computer interfaces will migrate from today’s text- and touch-based systems toward augmented and mixed reality (AR and MR) systems, with voice- and gesture-enabled UIs
  • Finally, we will see the rise of vast business networks. These networks will act like automated B2B marketplaces, facilitating information-sharing among partners, empowering workers with greater contextual knowledge, and augmenting business processes with enhanced information

IoT advancements will also improve and enhance many other areas of our lives and businesses—logistics with complete tracking and traceability all the way through the supply chain is another example of many.

We are only starting our IoT journey. The dramatic advances we’ve seen since the introduction of the smartphone—such as Apple’s open-sourced ResearchKit being used to monitor the health of pregnant women—foretell innovations and advancements that we can only start to imagine. The increasing pace of innovation, falling component prices, and powerful networking capabilities reinforce this bright future, even if we no longer use the term Internet of Things.

For a shorter-term view of the IoT, see 20 Technology Predictions To Keep Your Eye On In 2017.

Photo: Garry Knight on Flickr

Originally posted on my TomRaftery.com blog

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About Tom Raftery

Tom Raftery is VP and Global Internet of Things Evangelist for SAP. Previously Tom worked as an independent analyst focussing on the Internet of Things, Energy and CleanTech. Tom has a very strong background in social media, is the former co-founder of a software firm and is co-founder and director of hyper energy-efficient data center Cork Internet eXchange. More recently, Tom worked as an Industry Analyst for RedMonk, leading their GreenMonk practice for 7 years.