How Digital Transformation Is Changing The Future Of E-Commerce

Andre Smith

When e-commerce sites first came into existence, many shoppers were hesitant to use them. The websites presented an entirely new platform for customers to interact with sellers. A place where they could not personally see or touch the merchandise they were buying. A system where they had to pay in advance by going through a long and tedious online payment process.

Today, e-commerce has changed drastically with significantly safer online transactions and super-fast checkouts. Online shopping continues to gain popularity, creating new opportunities for both established online retailers and brand new startups. But e-commerce isn’t finished changing and improving. Let’s take a look at some of the changes that we are likely to see in the future of e-commerce.

Customization

An online shopper can now buy products such as shoes, clothes, and even glasses online by selecting the right size, fit, power, etc. This is a level of customization that was thought to be impossible when e-commerce sites were just starting. Customization is going to the next level, and online retailers will soon be able to provide individualized outfits made with a particular customer in mind. Customers will just need to enter the right data while shopping from the comfort of their home, and an outfit that not only fits perfectly, but also caters to their individual style sense, will be delivered directly to their home.

Human assistance

It may sound strange at first, but according to Varsity Tutors CEO Chuck Cohn, having human assistance while shopping online could go a long way towards not only boosting sales, but also in forging long-term relationships with customers. The concierge-style service will allow a real person to recommend products to a shopper based on personalization algorithms. Eventually, shoppers are highly likely to depend on the suggestions of their shopping assistants when trying to make their purchases.

Pinpointed recommendations

Some of the more established retailers are well known for providing great suggestions to shoppers. This is largely a result of the massive data aggregation and shopping algorithms they employ, which suggest the products most likely to appeal to specific customers. This process will reach new heights as the shopping algorithms become more advanced to include even more data from services and products used by each shopper. The results from such an algorithm, which has data from multiple sources, connected to each other only in relation to their relevance to the customer, can be astoundingly accurate.

The bottom line is that e-commerce has grown from an insignificant and limited business opportunity to a full-fledged, ever-growing market. In fact, many brick-and-mortar stores have opened up their own online retail sites in recognition of the growing business opportunities in this field. As digital transformation grows more prominent with each passing day, e-commerce will grow bigger and better as shopping from home becomes easier and friendlier.

Learn more about how to offer personalized suggestions to customers without creeping them out. See Is Personalization Killing Your Relationships With Customers?

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About Andre Smith

An Internet, Marketing and E-Commerce specialist with several years of experience in the industry. He has watched as the world of online business has grown and adapted to new technologies, and he has made it his mission to help keep businesses informed and up to date.

Five Goals For Small Business Owners For 2018

Aaron Solomon

Once you’ve wrapped up 2017, you should be hitting the ground running in 2018 for continued success. Here are five goals every small business owner should set for themselves in 2018.

Analyze 2017

While 2017 is over, don’t let it be forgotten. Review how your business performed and what drove revenue. Also pay attention to what didn’t work as well as you’d have liked and allocate your budgets and efforts accordingly. Learn from your successes and failures and use this information to set yourself up for success in 2018!

Increase your customer loyalty

In 2018, all of your competitors will (or should be) trying to take your customers. You should ensure that you have a plan in place for keeping them. Retailers may want to consider a loyalty points program or special promotions targeted at your existing customer base. Even if your business is not retail oriented, take the time to make sure your customers know that they are valued and that there is a benefit to staying with you.

Focus on your employees

A healthy business needs a competent, well-performing workforce. Take steps to not only retain your top performers, but attract top new talent. If you have staff that are not meeting expectations, coach them to improve performance or, if necessary, considering managing them out of your organization. Don’t let staffing hold you back!

Improve your social media marketing

Each passing year, social media marketing is more and more important for driving sales and ensuring success. If you don’t have a social media presence and marketing strategy, make it part of your goals for 2018 to get one started. If you already have one, make sure you’re taking the proper steps to improve it based on your 2017 performance.

Plan for expansion

A good mindset to have is that if you’re not growing, you’re falling behind. Your most threatening competitors will be working hard to grow their businesses, so don’t let them outpace you. Big or small, prioritize developing and executing a growth plan for 2018 to improve your market position!

For more tips on running your small business, visit the SAP Anywhere Customer Success Blog.

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About Aaron Solomon

Aaron Solomon is the head of Training and Content Development for SAP Anywhere. With a dedicated history in knowledge management and consulting, he is driven to provide quality information to customers and help them understand how best to grow their businesses. His areas of expertise include e-commerce management, data analysis, and leveraging technology to improve efficiency.

Adapting To The Digital Sales Revolution

Arif Johari

Is social selling at a tipping point?

“That magic moment when an idea, trend, or social behaviour crosses a threshold, tips, spreads like wildfire.” – Malcolm Gladwell

Social selling is impacting how sales and marketing teams collaborate, accelerate business, and engage customers. With the technology that supports social selling constantly changing, do the behaviours that make a great social seller need to change too?

The modern buyer requires a modern seller

Charlene Li, principal analyst at Altimeter, wrote in the report, The Transformation of Selling: How Digital Enables Seamless Selling: “Selling must transform because the ways customers buy have changed.”

Forrester’s Mary Shea put it this way in B2B Buyers Make The Case For Better Marketing And Sales Alignment: “Your buyers want contextual interactions with both human and digital assets across a holistic but non-linear journey. They want their experiences with salespeople to be high value or frictionless.”

Sales and marketing reps will be obsolete in two years if they do not adapt

Changing times begets a need for a change in behavior. Look at what email did for communications, the computer took away from the typewriter, CRM did for the world of customer service and sales force automation (SFA) for sales.

Sales and marketing professionals must be aligned with a common understanding of the current buyer’s needs. We must meet the buyer in their digitally connected, socially engaged, mobile-attached, and video-hungry preferences. Today’s buyer wants to talk only with professionals who can add demonstrable value.

Myth: Digital selling is the same as social selling

Incorrect. Social is a component of digital.

Digital selling is understanding how to align the mindset, skillset, and toolset to engage, connect, and grow a relationship through any digital platform—social, video, email, messaging, etc.

“Social does not take the place of a handshake, but it turns a handshake into a hug.” – Brian Fanzo

How to adapt to the digital sales revolution through a social approach

1. Update your LinkedIn profile from a resume to a resource

The more value you can bring to your audience, the more likely that they will become fans, referral partners, and clients.

The litmus test: Does your profile get your buyers excited to take your call? If the answer is yes, then your profile is working for you and your customers!

2. Recognize that Twitter and LinkedIn are like peanut butter and jelly: perfect together

If LinkedIn is your primary social media platform, don’t ignore the power of Twitter.

Add your LinkedIn URL to your Twitter profile. When you have a new targeted follower, start a conversation and invite them to connect with you on LinkedIn.

If your profile is positioned correctly, they will learn much more about you as a thought leader and you can begin to move them forward in the buyer’s journey.

3. Schedule time every single day to work on LinkedIn prospecting.

Treat that time as if you were with a client.

Don’t let your prospecting time get interrupted – it’s the number-one thing you can do to get in front of new clients.

Social selling has become such a hot topic that Coffee-Break with Game Changers is dedicating an entire series to exploring its various facets and promoting best practices for salespeople. To listen to other shows in this series, visit the SAP Radio area of the SAP News Center.

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Arif Johari

About Arif Johari

He is a Communications lead, Digital Marketing generalist, and Social Selling advocate. He trains marketing and sales employees to become experts in Social Selling so that they’d leverage social media as a leads-generation tool. He is responsible for executing innovative marketing strategies to increase engagement in social media, customer community, and landing pages through content, events, and A/B testing. He is passionate in making the work processes of the marketing and sales team more efficient, so that they can generate more revenue in a shorter time.

Human Skills for the Digital Future

Dan Wellers and Kai Goerlich

Technology Evolves.
So Must We.


Technology replacing human effort is as old as the first stone axe, and so is the disruption it creates.
Thanks to deep learning and other advances in AI, machine learning is catching up to the human mind faster than expected.
How do we maintain our value in a world in which AI can perform many high-value tasks?


Uniquely Human Abilities

AI is excellent at automating routine knowledge work and generating new insights from existing data — but humans know what they don’t know.

We’re driven to explore, try new and risky things, and make a difference.
 
 
 
We deduce the existence of information we don’t yet know about.
 
 
 
We imagine radical new business models, products, and opportunities.
 
 
 
We have creativity, imagination, humor, ethics, persistence, and critical thinking.


There’s Nothing Soft About “Soft Skills”

To stay ahead of AI in an increasingly automated world, we need to start cultivating our most human abilities on a societal level. There’s nothing soft about these skills, and we can’t afford to leave them to chance.

We must revamp how and what we teach to nurture the critical skills of passion, curiosity, imagination, creativity, critical thinking, and persistence. In the era of AI, no one will be able to thrive without these abilities, and most people will need help acquiring and improving them.

Anything artificial intelligence does has to fit into a human-centered value system that takes our unique abilities into account. While we help AI get more powerful, we need to get better at being human.


Download the executive brief Human Skills for the Digital Future.


Read the full article The Human Factor in an AI Future.


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About Dan Wellers

Dan Wellers is founder and leader of Digital Futures at SAP, a strategic insights and thought leadership discipline that explores how digital technologies drive exponential change in business and society.

Kai Goerlich

About Kai Goerlich

Kai Goerlich is the Chief Futurist at SAP Innovation Center network His specialties include Competitive Intelligence, Market Intelligence, Corporate Foresight, Trends, Futuring and ideation.

Share your thoughts with Kai on Twitter @KaiGoe.heif Futu

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The Human Factor In An AI Future

Dan Wellers and Kai Goerlich

As artificial intelligence becomes more sophisticated and its ability to perform human tasks accelerates exponentially, we’re finally seeing some attempts to wrestle with what that means, not just for business, but for humanity as a whole.

From the first stone ax to the printing press to the latest ERP solution, technology that reduces or even eliminates physical and mental effort is as old as the human race itself. However, that doesn’t make each step forward any less uncomfortable for the people whose work is directly affected – and the rise of AI is qualitatively different from past developments.

Until now, we developed technology to handle specific routine tasks. A human needed to break down complex processes into their component tasks, determine how to automate each of those tasks, and finally create and refine the automation process. AI is different. Because AI can evaluate, select, act, and learn from its actions, it can be independent and self-sustaining.

Some people, like investor/inventor Elon Musk and Alibaba founder and chairman Jack Ma, are focusing intently on how AI will impact the labor market. It’s going to do far more than eliminate repetitive manual jobs like warehouse picking. Any job that involves routine problem-solving within existing structures, processes, and knowledge is ripe for handing over to a machine. Indeed, jobs like customer service, travel planning, medical diagnostics, stock trading, real estate, and even clothing design are already increasingly automated.

As for more complex problem-solving, we used to think it would take computers decades or even centuries to catch up to the nimble human mind, but we underestimated the exponential explosion of deep learning. IBM’s Watson trounced past Jeopardy champions in 2011 – and just last year, Google’s DeepMind AI beat the reigning European champion at Go, a game once thought too complex for even the most sophisticated computer.

Where does AI leave human?

This raises an urgent question for the future: How do human beings maintain our economic value in a world in which AI will keep getting better than us at more and more things?

The concept of the technological singularity – the point at which machines attain superhuman intelligence and permanently outpace the human mind – is based on the idea that human thinking can’t evolve fast enough to keep up with technology. However, the limits of human performance have yet to be found. It’s possible that people are only at risk of lagging behind machines because nothing has forced us to test ourselves at scale.

Other than a handful of notable individual thinkers, scientists, and artists, most of humanity has met survival-level needs through mostly repetitive tasks. Most people don’t have the time or energy for higher-level activities. But as the human race faces the unique challenge of imminent obsolescence, we need to think of those activities not as luxuries, but as necessities. As technology replaces our traditional economic value, the economic system may stop attaching value to us entirely unless we determine the unique value humanity offers – and what we can and must do to cultivate the uniquely human skills that deliver that value.

Honing the human advantage

As a species, humans are driven to push past boundaries, to try new things, to build something worthwhile, and to make a difference. We have strong instincts to explore and enjoy novelty and risk – but according to psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, these instincts crumble if we don’t cultivate them.

AI is brilliant at automating routine knowledge work and generating new insights from existing data. What it can’t do is deduce the existence, or even the possibility, of information it isn’t already aware of. It can’t imagine radical new products and business models. Or ask previously unconceptualized questions. Or envision unimagined opportunities and achievements. AI doesn’t even have common sense! As theoretical physicist Michio Kaku says, a robot doesn’t know that water is wet or that strings can pull but not push. Nor can robots engage in what Kaku calls “intellectual capitalism” – activities that involve creativity, imagination, leadership, analysis, humor, and original thought.

At the moment, though, we don’t generally value these so-called “soft skills” enough to prioritize them. We expect people to develop their competency in emotional intelligence, cross-cultural awareness, curiosity, critical thinking, and persistence organically, as if these skills simply emerge on their own given enough time. But there’s nothing soft about these skills, and we can’t afford to leave them to chance.

Lessons in being human

To stay ahead of AI in an increasingly automated world, we need to start cultivating our most human abilities on a societal level – and to do so not just as soon as possible, but as early as possible.

Singularity University chairman Peter Diamandis, for example, advocates revamping the elementary school curriculum to nurture the critical skills of passion, curiosity, imagination, critical thinking, and persistence. He envisions a curriculum that, among other things, teaches kids to communicate, ask questions, solve problems with creativity, empathy, and ethics, and accept failure as an opportunity to try again. These concepts aren’t necessarily new – Waldorf and Montessori schools have been encouraging similar approaches for decades – but increasing automation and digitization make them newly relevant and urgent.

The Mastery Transcript Consortium is approaching the same problem from the opposite side, by starting with outcomes. This organization is pushing to redesign the secondary school transcript to better reflect whether and how high school students are acquiring the necessary combination of creative, critical, and analytical abilities. By measuring student achievement in a more nuanced way than through letter grades and test scores, the consortium’s approach would inherently require schools to reverse-engineer their curricula to emphasize those abilities.

Most critically, this isn’t simply a concern of high-tuition private schools and “good school districts” intended to create tomorrow’s executives and high-level knowledge workers. One critical aspect of the challenge we face is the assumption that the vast majority of people are inevitably destined for lives that don’t require creativity or critical thinking – that either they will somehow be able to thrive anyway or their inability to thrive isn’t a cause for concern. In the era of AI, no one will be able to thrive without these abilities, which means that everyone will need help acquiring them. For humanitarian, political, and economic reasons, we cannot just write off a large percentage of the population as disposable.

In the end, anything an AI does has to fit into a human-centered value system that takes our unique human abilities into account. Why would we want to give up our humanity in favor of letting machines determine whether or not an action or idea is valuable? Instead, while we let artificial intelligence get better at being what it is, we need to get better at being human. That’s how we’ll keep coming up with groundbreaking new ideas like jazz music, graphic novels, self-driving cars, blockchain, machine learning – and AI itself.

Read the executive brief Human Skills for the Digital Future.

Build an intelligent enterprise with AI and machine learning to unite human expertise and computer insights. Run live with SAP Leonardo.


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About Dan Wellers

Dan Wellers is founder and leader of Digital Futures at SAP, a strategic insights and thought leadership discipline that explores how digital technologies drive exponential change in business and society.

Kai Goerlich

About Kai Goerlich

Kai Goerlich is the Chief Futurist at SAP Innovation Center network His specialties include Competitive Intelligence, Market Intelligence, Corporate Foresight, Trends, Futuring and ideation.

Share your thoughts with Kai on Twitter @KaiGoe.heif Futu