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Are You Social Selling Or Social Spamming?

Mark Babbitt

The Social Age has ushered in a new way of connecting, contributing, and collaborating like we’ve never seen before.

We can now communicate with anyone at any time, anywhere in the world over a variety of platforms. We can now begin to build mutually beneficial relationships with a single Tweet, post, or upload. We can share our stories, build awareness, and right some wrongs from our kitchen table, the subway, and during work.

Social media, when used for good, is beyond powerful – it is unifying.

And then there’s the dark side: the trolls, drama queens, divas, fakers, takers, ask-holes – and especially the spammers – who pollute social media with their own brand of selfishness.

Lately, it’s the spammers that have caught my attention most. That’s probably because I can shut down the other malcontents easily enough, but those spammers… they won’t go away. The worst part? They don’t see themselves as spammers! They call what they do “social selling.”

I prefer to call it what it is: social spamming.

How do you tell the difference between social selling and social spamming? Well, you are a social spammer if you:

Send auto DMs and emails

Use of auto-DMs on Twitter, for any reason, is unacceptable. Yes, this includes those ridiculous “Thanks for following me, {Twitter_Handle}! Let’s also connect on Facebook {Facebook URL} and LinkedIn {LinkedIn URL}!” messages. It also includes ANY request to download a FREE ANYTHING by visiting your site.

Auto DMs suck. Period. And everyone knows that by now. Which means you’re either blissfully unaware… or you don’t care.

Abuse LinkedIn inmail

You connect with people on LinkedIn using “InMaul” (Steve Levy’s clever term) not to build a mutually beneficial relationship, but to sell them something on your very next communication. And then there are the below-average recruiters, sourcers, and HR types who target people, then send an InMail to promote their job posting or an open requisition… but that job doesn’t actually exist. And you knew that, but decided that increasing your network for future commission-based sales was more important than getting job seekers’ hopes up – and then dash them – for your personal gain.

This isn’t just the Social Age equivalent of telemarketing… it’s a violation of trust.

Treat LinkedIn like Facebook

When you contribute to the rapid downfall of LinkedIn by posting a Donald Trump meme, a math game, or a pretty picture of a sunset – or anything else that doesn’t involve professional networking or career development, you are a spammer.

Social media is NOT all about you and your personal agendas – that is especially true, some of us still believe, of LinkedIn.

Add the unwilling and unknowing to Facebook groups

When you add people to your Facebook group without their permission, you’re a spammer. I mostly blame Facebook for this one; why would they allow ANYONE else be able to add you to their Facebook groups without asking you first?!

And yet I can only be added by a “friend” so many times to the “Fans of Days of Our Lives” Facebook Group before I start to take it personally.

Exploit Facebook tags

You tag people on your Facebook posts not because they are already involved in the discussion, or even because the discussion is relevant to them, but because you want them to read and share your latest post or join in your latest outrage. You know those tags mean YOUR stuff shows up in MY Facebook timeline, right? That your drama becomes my drama?

Why would you do that?

Seek Facebook friends from low places

So, we have 138 friends in common on Facebook… but I’ve never heard of you. And yet you still send a “friend” request? We have a different definition of “friend.” As Jon Ferrara says, “How about following me on Twitter first, adding value to my conversation, then reach out on LinkedIn with a tailored invite demonstrating that you’ve taken time to understand who I am and why your connecting. Finally after you’ve earned some trust and intimacy, now let’s be friends on Facebook.”

Leverage fake Twitter followers

If you create, sell, or buy fake Twitter followers, you are deliberately contributing to the noise and everything that can be wrong with social media. You are a cheater. And a liar. Besides, you know that we all know how to discover how “real” your Twitter followers are, right?

Maybe not, because you are probably that unaware character who also sends all of those auto-friggin-DMs.

Scrape email addresses

You scrape websites, including LinkedIn, for email addresses. You then work around every aspect of the CAN-SPAM law to send an email you had no business sending. And now, even though it might tell you the email address really is me so you can sell it to some other spammer, we all have to hit that ‘Unsubscribe’ button you put in the bottom of each email as required by CAN-SPAM.

Which proves you knew better.

Scrape cell numbers

You read in a blog somewhere that people always respond to a text, even if they don’t respond to email or social. So you went to the ‘Contact Info’ section of LinkedIn, or perhaps our website, and scraped a phone number. And now you text and text and text and text. Even when I don’t answer your feeble attempts to sell me your crap via text, you text. This, my spammy unfriend, is why we have ‘Block’ buttons on our phones. (Thanks to Nicole Virant for her contribution to this post… she brought this one home.)

Fail to follow up

You make it through all the filters in place. Based on implied trust, you convince me you are interested in building a relationship. And then I never hear from you again. Or, perhaps even worse, we set up a time to talk and you either don’t show up or are ill-prepared?

From my perspective (and Jon Ferrara’s): This is one of the worst kinds of spam, because you got past the gatekeepers only to become a total time-suck.

Any attempt to sell lead-generation services

As Janet Fouts says, “You endorse me for several things on Linkedin over a series of days to get my attention, then ask to connect only to send an automated spam message asking me if I want to buy leads.”

I get this all the time, and my immediate thought is, “You got to me by spamming. If I use your system or service, is that how you want me to be thought of too?” Yeah, I’ll pass.

Expose cleavage on KinkedIn – the UNprofessional network

The newest trend on LinkedIn is also one of the most concerning – a likely carryover from the Twitter wannabe-Kardashians who seem to show up in every trending topic on that platform. I’m talking about the profile pictures from young women who seem to attract a lot of attention from frat brothers, single young men, and lonely old men.

Cover the girls up, ladies… your cleavage shots, duck lips, and Vogue-poses are just contributing to the noise in social media. (Credit to Julie Albright for the term “KinkedIn” – made coffee come out my nose when I first read it.)

So there you have it… 12 ways we know you’re using “social selling” as an excuse to use social and digital media as a personal spamming platform.

If you are doing any of these, either to promote your business or inject others into your personal life, drama, or ambitions without their consent… you’re a social spammer.

Do us all a favor: Stop.

Help us get social media back to what it was intended to be…  social.

For more insight on social media strategies, see Should You Outsource Your Company’s Social Media Initiative?

The post Are You Social Selling or Social Spamming? appeared first on Switch & Shift.

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How To Master Social Media Marketing In 2017

Michael Brenner

Social media is a constantly evolving medium, from which sites are trending within your industry to the latest Facebook features and Instagram influencers – let alone the development of completely new social media platforms every time you turn on your laptop. How can modern marketers expect to keep up?

The secret is to embrace the change. After all, it is the rapid advancements and constant stream of innovations that have provided digital marketers with so much to work with in the first place. So, no, your social media marketing campaigns this year are not going to look the same as the ones you used in 2016—at least, not if you want to generate more leads and stand a chance against your competitors.

If you want to make an impact with your social media efforts, it is time to give your strategy a refresh. Here is what you need to know to master your social media marketing and to stay ahead of the trends in 2017.

Customize your use of major and niche social media sites

Facebook is still number one, and that isn’t going to change in 2017. In fact, Facebook itself is a world in itself to keep up to date with – in this year alone, it is predicted that Facebook Live will be monetized and that the Call to Action buttons for local business pages will be updated.

Currently the top five social media sites in terms of reach and impact are:

  1. Facebook
  2. Instagram
  3. Twitter
  4. Pinterest
  5. Tumblr

While these networks are important, there is also value in niche networks for many businesses. For example, DeviantArt is geared towards illustrators, designers, and other artists, as well as art enthusiasts – and has a huge network of 26,000,000. While this site might be useless for, say, an insurance brokerage, it would be incredibly powerful for a photography school. Other examples include eToro for finance professionals, Wayn for travel and tourism, 43 Things for health and wellness brands—and the list goes on as more networks are created and gain active users.

This year, instead of trying to have your brand on every major site and spreading your resources too thin, create a strategy that makes sense for your industry – and your business.

Start with the biggest. With 1.79 billion monthly active users, Facebook is a wise choice.

Next, choose one or two other major networks. Visual industries like clothing and apparel, food, and travel are well-suited to sites like Pinterest and Instagram, while service-oriented industries may gain more leads from LinkedIn and Twitter.

Finally, consider a niche social media network. Many have several million active users and may offer a unique way for you to reach out to leads and to build brand awareness.

Make your video more sophisticated

pixabay

Throughout 2016, the use of video on social media grew, but its impact exploded. A recent survey by Wyzowl found that 84% of consumers said they have been convinced to make a purchase choice after viewing a brand’s video – and 91% claimed to have watched a video to learn about a product or service they were interested in. Now consider that only 63% of businesses taking advantage of video right now.

Videos that engage with viewers tend to be very effective. While customer testimonials and demonstration videos will always have their place, add challenges, puzzles, games, and surveys to your video content, along with informational videos, to keep people interested and talking on social media. Buzzfeed’s Tasty does an excellent job of this.

For some businesses, live streaming can make a strong impact. Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram are all being used by social media savvy brands to engage with consumers in real-time with interviews, Q&A sessions, and brand events.

If you haven’t already branched into video, 2017 is the year. If you are already using promotional videos on your social media channels, then this is the year to make them better. The use of video for social media marketing is no longer new. This year, it’s about coming up with creative, fresh ideas that will capture your audience and inspire leads.

Focus on the influencers

A business could run eleven different social media accounts, with Twitter updates every two hours, Facebook postings twice a day, vibrant Pinterest boards, and an active presence on LinkedIn. But they still would not make the same impact that a couple of mentions by one major social media influencer would create. The big influencers have legions of followers who often look to their voice as a sort of industry guiding force.

While in the past, consistent regular posting was the way to go, make sure you aren’t overextending your marketing efforts with too many platforms – and too many posts. You may not just be draining your resources, but these resources may be better spent with a more concentrated focal point, like an industry influencer.

Furious Pete (TV, food, and fitness) has more than 5 million YouTube followers. Kristina Bazan (fashion) has more than 2.4 million Instagram followers. Jake Paul (millennials) has more than 17 million social media followers. A social media mention from an influencer, or better yet, a video post that mentions your product or service is going to reach a profoundly broad and engaged audience.

Many major companies are now partnering – and paying – the big influencers to promote their product. If you want to master social media, pay attention to who the influencers are in your market.

They don’t have to be the biggest names around, but with a few hundred thousand followers you can make an impact if you can get these people to share, like, tweet, or feature your content in some way. Use resources like BuzzSumo and find the top blogs in your industry to get a better idea of who the influencers are that you may want to connect with.

Examine your social media ads – a lot

Ads continue to be a popular social media marketing tool as they offer marketers a cost-effective way not just to build brand awareness, but also to test their products and messaging and to get important feedback for building future campaigns.

Facebook ads still offer the best ROI by far – 95.8%, compared to 63.5% on Twitter and 2.1% on Snapchat. However, these numbers can shift quickly, especially as the newer networks like Snapchat and Instagram blossom in 2017.

Managing director of Traktek Partners Cyril Lemaire warns that Twitter will see a double-digit decline in active users this year. While this may or may not come to pass, it is important to be agile and to switch gears midstream if your ads aren’t working.

Make sure you are consistently measuring the results of your advertising campaigns, and track changes over time. This will help your team make smart decisions when it comes to social media advertising.

Take a fresh approach to your social media marketing efforts in order to take advantage of the opportunities that are available right now. No longer does it make sense to just chug away with your accounts and follow general trends. Your marketing efforts should be both more sophisticated and much more creative. The brands that can master these qualities will leap ahead in 2017.

For more insight on social media strategies, see How To Weave Social Media Into The Fabric Of The Business.

Image: pixabay

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About Michael Brenner

Michael Brenner is a globally-recognized keynote speaker, author of  The Content Formula and the CEO of Marketing Insider GroupHe has worked in leadership positions in sales and marketing for global brands like SAP and Nielsen, as well as for thriving startups. Today, Michael shares his passion on leadership and marketing strategies that deliver customer value and business impact. He is recognized by the Huffington Post as a Top Business Keynote Speaker and   a top  CMO influencer by Forbes.

The Death Of The Water Cooler Moment: Advertising In The On-Demand Landscape

Michael Brenner

The water cooler moment ranks among the unsung cultural drivers of modern corporate life. Imagine it’s Monday morning in the office, staff are arriving and preparing for the working week ahead, but leaving their desks for a minute or two to grab a glass of water or a cup of coffee or tea, and lingering around the water cooler discussing the weekend’s news or must-see binge-worthy series on Netflix.

As a cultural phenomenon it was almost unique. There was no broadcasting taking place, no additional message being transmitted, just groups of people gathering together to discuss key moments in popular culture and current events. But to dismiss this sort of occurrence as simple is to miss out on the bigger picture altogether.

It was the social and psychological complexity of the water cooler moment that made it so valuable for advertisers and digital marketers. People don’t want to be socially excluded. They don’t want to miss out on the cultural products du jour or appear ignorant on the issues of the day.

This psychology exerts pressure; it pushes media consumers and television watchers to follow the herd, bunching up and collecting themselves into one place. This makes the life of a media services provider much easier.

The end of an era

Two things torpedoed the water cooler moment: advances in technology and shifting attitudes towards television consumption. Homes that once had a single central television set are now not so limited. Several decades ago, as televisions became cheaper, households often bought second or third sets for other rooms. In recent years, computers have found pride of place in the home, providing more screens on which to view broadcasts traditionally reserved for the television.

Tablets and smartphones now proliferate, as do on-demand media services. Consumers can watch whatever they want, whenever they want, however they want, and wherever they want. The water cooler moment hinged on communal experience; it required groups of people gathering in front of devices – not necessarily in the same place – but certainly at the same time. This doesn’t happen in the same way it used to.

Attitudes have shifted, too. To understand this, we only need to look at news coverage. News was once carefully regimented. Unless you were close enough to an event to hear about it through word of mouth or even witness it for yourself, information was fed to you via newspapers in the morning and evening, and via 25-minute bulletins at set points throughout the day.

Again, this delivered us a sense of communal experience, of witnessing the unfolding of events together, en masse. The audience was unified in their consumption of facts and figures, delivered at regular intervals.

Not anymore. Now there is rolling news, there is 24-hour connection via smartphones and other devices, there are news websites, there are live blogs, there are Twitter accounts and Medium posts, there are even dissident blogs giving you unfiltered, unrefined versions of alternative news.

Your understanding of the world is now solely your own; and no one else’s.

Beyond the cooler: What’s next for digital marketing?

Broadcasters must adapt. There is a new status quo, and media products must be positioned to fit into this renewed conception of what is normal. However, marketers must remember that this is not – or not yet, anyway – a complete revolution.

In 2013, Business Insider reported that television remains the dominant device in living rooms, at least in America, although it continues to lose ground to other pieces of tech. Statistics released by Marketing Charts in 2016 show that this is still the case and that the majority of U.S households are still loyal to the schedules, with 13 hours of scheduled television for every hour of “time-shifted” content.

We exist now in a state of transition in the media. The water cooler moment is gone, simply because users can now catch-up or re-watch key moments at any time, and so the sense of commonality is removed from the process. The water cooler moments that remain – such as the Super Bowl – are priced so far out of the market for advertisers that they might as well not exist at all.

So, what can broadcasters do? They need to create new water cooler moments, facilitating new conversations and new meeting points, tying the different mediums together. As digital marketers, we cannot afford to turn our backs on traditional forms of television just yet; instead, we need to integrate our efforts and connect with our audience en masse, across all channels.

While the water cooler has fallen, social media has risen. Social platforms may lack the human element of water cooler conversations, but they make up for this in power and scope. Look online; people are talking, discussing television shows and other cultural products in vast numbers, creating a powerful flow of discourse. The next step for broadcasters is to position their products at the heart of that discourse.

A new type of conversation around the digital water cooler

The conversation is still there; it has just moved online. In many ways, social media has become the digital water cooler, providing a forum for information exchange and cultural communication.

We can view this as a web, stretching out, linking, and uniting all the different positions in which the media engages with the public.

For digital marketers and broadcasters – now bereft of the water cooler moments they once tapped into – this represents a whole new space in which to build momentum and to spark conversation. Marketers can accompany traditional television content with hashtags and social media information to help start the discourse online, deploying directly clickable share buttons when the content is posted on a smart device.

Interaction can be incentivized with competitions and other giveaways or nurtured by opening up strategizing sessions to collaborative effort. Such interaction enhances the profile of a broadcast or a media product, while also breeding data that can then be fed back into the planning process and used in outlining future objectives.

Platforms come and platforms go, but some things remain constant; humans are social creatures and there will always be a market for discussing popular culture. In this sense, the water cooler moment never went away at all, it just changed form.

To find out more about shaping the digital water cooler, click here.

This post is the third of a seven-part series, “Reimagining Media in The Digital Age.” Check back weekly for further blogs in the series.

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About Michael Brenner

Michael Brenner is a globally-recognized keynote speaker, author of  The Content Formula and the CEO of Marketing Insider GroupHe has worked in leadership positions in sales and marketing for global brands like SAP and Nielsen, as well as for thriving startups. Today, Michael shares his passion on leadership and marketing strategies that deliver customer value and business impact. He is recognized by the Huffington Post as a Top Business Keynote Speaker and   a top  CMO influencer by Forbes.

Is Personalization Killing Your Relationships With Customers?

Christopher Koch

 

Customers Want Personalization…

 

Customers expect a coordinated, personalized response across all channels. For example, 91% expect to pick up where they left off when they switch channels.

Source: “Omni-Channel Service Doesn’t Measure Up; Customers Are Tired of Playing Games” (Aspect Blog, January 29, 2014)

laptop_phone

 


 

… And they Want it Now

 

Customers also want their interactions to be live – or in the moment they choose. For example, nearly 60% of consumers want real-time promotions and 48% like online reminders to order items that they might have run out of.

realtime

That means companies need to become a Live Business – a business that can coordinate multiple functions in order to respond to and even anticipate customer demand at any moment.

Source: “U.S. Consumers Want More Personalized Retail Experience and Control Over Personal Information, Accenture Survey Shows” (Accenture, March 9, 2015)

 


 

But There’s a Catch: Trust

 

73percent

Customers are demanding more intimacy, but there’s only so far companies can go before they cross over the line to creepy. For example, facial-recognition technology that identifies age and gender to target advertisements on digital screens is considered creepy by 73% of people surveyed.

Source: “In-Store Personalization: Creepy or Cool?” (RichRelevance, 2015)

 


 

How to Earn Their Trust and Keep It

 

Here are some ways to improve trust while moving forward with omnichannel personalization.

trustfall

1-01

Customers Want Value for Their Data

An Accenture study found that the majority of consumers in the United States and the United Kingdom are willing to allow trusted retailers to use some of their personal data in order to present personalized and targeted products, services, recommendations, and offers.

Source: “U.S. Consumers Want More Personalized Retail Experience and Control Over Personal Information, Accenture Survey Shows” (Accenture, March 9, 2015)

 

2-01

Don’t Take Data, Let Customers Offer It

Customers who voluntarily provide data are less likely to be annoyed by personalization that’s built around it. Mobile apps are a great way to invite customers to share more data in a relationship that they control.

 

3-01

Be Clear About How You Will Use Data

Companies should think about the customer data transaction – such as what information the customer is giving them, how it’s being used, and what the result will be – and describe it as simply as possible.

 


 

download arrowTo learn more about how to personalize without destroying trust, read the in-depth report Live Businesses Deliver a Personal Customer Experience Without Losing Trust.

 

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About Christopher Koch

Christopher Koch is the Editorial Director of the SAP Center for Business Insight. He is an experienced publishing professional, researcher, editor, and writer in business, technology, and B2B marketing. Share your thoughts with Chris on Twitter @Ckochster.

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Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

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Dr. Achim Krüger

About Dr. Achim Krüger

Dr. Achim Krüger is Vice President of Operational Excellence (EAM and EH&S) at SAP. After starting his career as an officer with the German Air Force, he held several positions in the areas of maintenance of helicopters and transport aircraft as well as systems engineering, before he worked in higher commands as a logistics general staff officer. Joining SAP in 2002, Dr. Krüger first served as a consultant before establishing the SAP for Defense & Security industry portfolio and later assumed several other duties in Solution Management and Development,

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Marcell Vollmer

About Marcell Vollmer

Marcell Vollmer is the Chief Digital Officer for SAP Ariba (SAP). He is responsible for helping customers digitalize their supply chain. Prior to this role, Marcell was the Chief Operating Officer for SAP Ariba, enabling the company to setup a startup within the larger SAP business. He was also the Chief Procurement Officer at SAP SE, where he transformed the global procurement organization towards a strategic, end-to-end driven organization, which runs SAP Ariba and SAP Fieldglass solutions, as well as Concur technologies in the cloud. Marcell has more than 20 years of experience in working in international companies, starting with DHL where he delivered multiple supply chain optimization projects.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Nic Smith

About Nic Smith

Nic Smith leads the global product marketing organization for business intelligence and cloud analytics at SAP. As a data-driven marketing leader, his experience in enterprise and business consumer marketing strategies supports customer innovation and consistently drives growth targets. Nic brings a unique blend of experience in product marketing, field marketing, product management, digital marketing, and customer experience with a proven record of leading great teams and initiatives for companies such as SAP, Microsoft, and Business Objects.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Jayne Landry

About Jayne Landry

Jayne Landry is the global vice president and general manager for Business Intelligence at SAP. Ms. Landry joined Crystal Decisions in 2002 and came into SAP through the Business Objects acquisition in 2007. A seasoned executive with 20+ years of experience in the technology sector, Jayne has held leadership roles in high-tech companies in the CRM, mobility, and cloud applications space. Ms. Landry holds a Bachelor of Commerce degree from the University of Auckland, and has continued executive development with Queen’s University, Ontario, and through work with the Sauder School of Business at the University of British Columbia.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Roger Noia

About Roger Noia

Roger Noia is the director of Solution Marketing, SAP Jam Collaboration, at SAP. He is responsible for product marketing and sales enablement for our dedicated sales team as well as the broader SAP sales force selling SAP Jam.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Stephen Cloughley

About Stephen Cloughley

As part of the global Life Sciences Business Unit at SAP, Stephen Cloughley drives supply chain solutions with a special focus on serialization in the wholesales, consumer, and pharmaceutical industries. Stephen is a chemical engineer from University College Dublin and has over 20 years experience in the software industry in Europe, South Africa, and the United States.   

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Dr. Ravi Prakash Mathur

About Dr. Ravi Prakash Mathur

Dr. Ravi Prakash Mathur is Senior Director of Supply Chain Management (SCM) and Head of Logistics and Central Planning at Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories Ltd. He heads the global logistics, central planning, and central sourcing for the pharmaceutical organization. Winner of the 2015 Top 25 Digitalist Thought Leaders of India award from SAP, Dr. Mathur is an author, coach, and supply chain professional with 23 years of experience and is based in Hyderabad. He is also actively involved in academic activities and is an internal trainer for DRL for negotiation skills and SCM. In 2014, he co-authored the book “Quality Assurance in Pharmaceuticals & Operations Management and Industrial Safety” for Dr. B. R. Ambedkar University, Hyderabad. He is also member of The Departmental Visiting Committee (DVC) for Department of Biotechnology, Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology (MNNIT) Allahabad. Professional recognitions include a citation from World Bank and International Finance Corporation for his contribution to their publication “Doing Business in 2006” and the winner of the Logistics-Week Young Achiever in Supply Chain Award for 2012.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

About Michael Brenner

Michael Brenner is a globally-recognized keynote speaker, author of  The Content Formula and the CEO of Marketing Insider GroupHe has worked in leadership positions in sales and marketing for global brands like SAP and Nielsen, as well as for thriving startups. Today, Michael shares his passion on leadership and marketing strategies that deliver customer value and business impact. He is recognized by the Huffington Post as a Top Business Keynote Speaker and   a top  CMO influencer by Forbes.

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awareness