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The Future Of Marketing In An Increasingly Ad-Free World

Michael Brenner

The future of marketing is being debated by leaders in our industry. Some see a shift to more customer-focused content marketing. Others want to continue pushing product promotion content interruptions. Which side are you on?

Ad blocking gets serious

There are approximately 200 million monthly active users of ad blockers globally, according to a recent study by Adobe and PageFair. And a more recent study by Comscore found that 10% of U.S. consumers are already using ad blocking.

Apple’s mobile operating system now allows users to enable ad blocking, so expect to see much higher ad blocker usage this year.

Brands are going out of their way to get and keep consumer eyeballs. Packaged goods giant Unilever, for example, has so far spent $15 million on its “future hunting” Foundry program, in hopes of connecting with marketing-tech startups to earn more consumer attention, loyalty, and ultimately, sales.

Ad blocking is not the only challenge marketers are facing. According to Deloitte, 55% of TV programming is now viewed via DVRs, video-streaming subscriptions, and other sources. And for millennials ages 14 to 25, this number jumps up to 72%.

People are no longer consuming media the same way a mass audience would in the past. They are now customizing content according to their own preferences. Rather than fighting this fragmentation, many companies, like Clorox Co., are embracing it.

Clorox has shifted more than 40% of its media spending to digital. Using programmatic media, the company is able to not only save money but reach people with more relevant ads to convert them into sales. According to Clorox chief marketing officer Eric Reynolds, this is the secret to their steady growth.

Improved targeting is only one part of the agenda. The industry also needs to find more creative, effective ways to reach today’s consumers, either by making it harder for viewers to avoid ads or to get them to opt in.

Increasing popularity of unavoidable ads

Some companies are spending their marketing dollars on media where ads are harder to avoid. For example, GE has shifted money to sports programming like NFL football and NCAA games. Others are pouring their dollars into the least avoidable forms of digital advertising. Pre-roll, search, and mobile newsfeed ads on Facebook and Google are increasingly annoying and impossibly difficult to avoid, even with ad blockers on.

What makes Google and Facebook so attractive for marketers though isn’t just their relative immunity to ad blockers alone; their huge audiences also allow brands to minimize costs while maximizing reach.

Content marketing on the rise?

More marketers are doing content marketing now if they haven’t already. But not everyone is a fan. Procter & Gamble global brand officer Marc Pritchard is one of them. He feels the term content marketing itself is “overused and underdefined.

Pritchard prefers calling marketers’ work “advertising,” since at the end day it’s about influencing consumer purchasing decisions to achieve a brand’s goals. And while I don’t agree with Pritchard that the term “content marketing” is still misunderstood by many in our industry, I don’t think calling it the exact opposite of what it is will help either.

PepsiCo Global Beverage Group president Brad Jakeman, on the other hand, wants the industry to stop using the term “advertising” in favor of “content.” Amen, brother! No one ever asked for an ad to interrupt their content experience. But everyone consumes content.

Love it or hate it, content marketing isn’t going away anytime soon. According to PQ Media, content marketing currently accounts for $67 billion in U.S. spending, and is expected to continue to grow.

It’s easy to imagine why Pritchard feels this way. P&G’s CEO doesn’t hand him a bucket of money to do marketing, especially not content marketing. The CEO of P&G and many other consumer brands wants their marketing team to make ads and coupons. And lots of them. Reach and frequency, baby!

And while they litter the streets and the airwaves with enough pieces of torn up paper to host a ticker tape parade, they “count what they catch.”

To many in the marketing world, reach and frequency is awesome. It is the source of their budget and power. It is easy to buy reach and frequency and shout into the wind. Who cares if no one hears it?

Just don’t ask Pritchard, and countless other CMOs who love their big advertising budgets, to try and figure out engagement.

I once said this to a big brand CMO (right to his face) after he told me they only care about reach: “Well, I guess you can shout into the wind, or you can engage directly with your target audience.” I was suggesting they try and measure engagement.

He didn’t care. He wasn’t moved. He certainly didn’t change. He just went and bought more ads.

Making avoidable ads unavoidable

With the growth of content marketing, it’s often assumed that the creative and production costs associated with content marketing would be higher compared to media spending.

However, a recent survey by Percolate found that 20% of overall marketing budgets are allocated to creative costs, and the biggest driver is not content marketing.

Marketers are now spending more on creative costs for traditional ads to make them more appealing to their target audience so viewers will not avoid them.

New face for brick-and-mortar stores

People can avoid ads, but they still have to buy things. To reach people in store, brands have to find new ways to encourage people to make purchases in stores rather than online.

Revlon, a brand that has relied heavily on traditional advertising and promotion displays in the past, began experimenting with adding beauty consultants to cosmetics counters in shopping malls. The brand hopes to use trial samples to drive purchases at stores. Hey, this feels more like content marketing than advertising. Help your customers and they will be more likely to buy from you.

Even fast-food chains are revamping their physical stores as a marketing tactic to attract more customers. Domino’s Pizza, for instance, has renovated 2,000 stores as part of its “pizza theater re-image,” with openly visible kitchens that allow customers to order and watch their pizzas being made.

Similarly, Wendy’s has opted for a more contemporary look, with fireplaces, flat-screen TVs and low-slung, cushioned chairs. Many grocery stores, such as Kroger, are also getting a face-lift to look more upscale, adding higher-end amenities such as coffee shops and sushi and oyster bars.

The new brick and mortar: Amazon

While e-commerce represents a very small percentage of total grocery sales – estimated at 2%, according to Morgan Stanley – it inevitably still has an impact on margins, particularly in-store promotions. With customers taking fewer trips to the shopping malls, in-store displays are reaching fewer and fewer people.

And 2016 may actually be the year for grocery e-commerce. Morgan Stanley’s consumer survey found that 26% of online shoppers are expected to purchase groceries online this year, up from only 8% a year ago.

This trend explains why many companies, such as Clorox, are dedicating more promotion resources to e-commerce sites and businesses like Amazon and Walmart.com. While one would think that big retail players like Target and Walmart would be consolidating, the reality is that retail is fragmenting too, like marketing and media. Small-format stores are growing in number as a result of urbanization, requiring big companies to reallocate and diversify their resources.

“Native advertising for e-commerce”

P&G is the world’s biggest ad spender for “point-of-market entry,” or sampling. It offers customers samples of its products at times when customers are most likely going to make brand decisions. For example, in the past P&G has provided samples of Pampers diapers to maternity wards and at Lamaze classes.

This growing interest in targeting and reaching consumers with product samples at the right moment, even when they are not shopping at stores physically, has fueled the growth of companies like Exact Media, which specializes in distributing highly targeted sample packages to consumers. In the last year alone, Exact Media’s sales has tripled, with big clients like P&G, Johnson & Johnson, and Unilever under its belt.

Exact Media’s CEO Ray Cao says the idea is like “native advertising for e-commerce.” He explains, “If I’m getting a shirt, and I also get a sample of laundry detergent, it doesn’t feel like I’m getting a random banner ad.”

Maybe P&G isn’t lost forever.

Rethinking product packaging

Coke’s “Share a Coke” labels, which feature people’s names printed on the bottles, is perhaps one of the best examples of customizing packaging to better connect and reach consumers.

Many other brands are also tapping into customized packaging to get closer to their customers. Clorox’s Brita, for example, has partnered with Amazon to sell chip-enabled water filters, which will automatically generate online orders of replacements when a customer’s old filter is almost used up.

Technological advances such as digital printing, conductive inks, Bluetooth-enabled packaging, and near-field communications for mobile phones, are opening up endless possibilities for brands to re-imagine their packaging to better engage consumers and win their loyalty.

The future of marketing focuses on customer value

OK, so traditional marketing tactics are not dead. Many are finding new ways to reach, engage, and convert their target consumers by focusing on providing value. But let’s please not call all this cool stuff “advertising.” It’s just what marketing is supposed to be: helpful!

What do you think? Have you seen any other disruptive trends or ideas that you think marketers should know or try out? Please share your thoughts below!

Photo Source: flickr

To learn how you can start to create content people actually want, contact me here and let’s talk about how we can help, or subscribe here to receive my latest updates.

The post The Future Of Marketing In An Increasingly Ad-Free World appeared first on Marketing Insider Group.

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About Michael Brenner

Michael Brenner is a globally-recognized keynote speaker, author of  The Content Formula and the CEO of Marketing Insider GroupHe has worked in leadership positions in sales and marketing for global brands like SAP and Nielsen, as well as for thriving startups. Today, Michael shares his passion on leadership and marketing strategies that deliver customer value and business impact. He is recognized by the Huffington Post as a Top Business Keynote Speaker and   a top  CMO influencer by Forbes.

Shaping Consumer Buying Habits In A Post-Choice World

Shady Ghattas

Have you noticed how stressed-out many marketing professionals have become over the past few years?

Or, if you’re a marketer who’s been in the game for a while, have you reflected on how much more hectic and challenging your job has become since social media forced you to drink through the data firehose?

The explosion of Internet media has introduced more customer touch points than marketers can possibly keep up with. When TV, magazines, billboards, and the like were the only ways to be seen by consumers, it was manageable. Today, not a chance. CEOs are pushing CMOs harder and harder to prove the ROI of their marketing investments—something most marketers still struggle with.

At its core, the role of the marketer has always been about choice/rejection. Choose our brand, reject the competitor. Marketers target the “moments of truth” to achieve this. In the digital world, there are many more moments of truth to manage. Think of all the interactions on social media and how brands need to get defensive really quickly in some situations. In the past, marketers had a good idea of when those moments were, and they were largely in control during those moments.

While most marketers continue to grapple with these new realities of today, let’s look at how you’ll need to do marketing to be successful 5 to 10 years from now—and how you can start laying the foundations today so you don’t get caught unprepared again.

The next wave of marketing—which has already begun in some areas—will be based on automation. Automation will create a new paradigm for marketers, one where choice/rejection is removed from the equation. The digital age expanded the number of touch points for choice/rejection, whereas the automation age has the potential to eliminate them. The question becomes: “What is the role of the marketer if there is no opportunity to influence?”

Think for a second about Amazon Dash, a device that enables you to purchase products by simply pressing a button. Think about that smart fridge that might be in your kitchen a few years from now, ordering a new carton of milk for you when it recognizes that you’re running low. Imagine that each virtually mindless, purely habitual purchase you make is no longer even that – the possibility of you breaking the mold and choosing something new has gone from 1% to 0.1%. To marketers, that is a world of difference. Unilever is one company that seems to understand this thread, given its $1B acquisition of Dollar Shave Club.

When you no longer go into the store to select your brand of laundry detergent, how does a competing brand tempt you to choose their product instead? If a brand can no longer tempt you with an attractive promotion, superior product placement, better pricing or product (the traditional 4Ps of marketing), how does a marketer get you to switch to their brand?

The answer is the marketer can no longer be about just marketing. The marketer needs to become an expert on the entire customer experience.

The complete customer experience is in part about how the front office and the back office work together. If you press the Dash order button but your order never arrives or arrives late, that’s not a positive experience. If you order but your billing is out of whack, that’s not a positive experience either. The entire shopping experience, from ordering to receiving, must link together perfectly. Automation will provide an opportunity for brands that can offer a better overall experience to win in the market. Brands that get the automation piece right, integrate their front and back office, and offer that amazing customer experience will see their margins rise and the risk of losing customers fall significantly.

Ivey Business School marketing professor Niraj Dawar explains, “Spending billions to remind consumers to buy your brand will seem inordinately wasteful. Instead, advertising dollars will be redeployed to building relationships, challenging incumbents, increasing rates of consumption, and influencing algorithm designers and owners. Brand loyalty will be redefined, forcing marketers to differentiate much more clearly between mere repurchase and actual loyalty. Marketers of incumbent brands will need to ask whether the algorithm is “loyal” or the consumer is. For challengers, the critical question will be what they need to do to compel consumers to change the algorithm’s default settings.”

The companies that succeed in the digital age will not just get the customer experience right, they’ll also understand that it’s about the power of connecting the business and the brand at every node. With this comes an opportunity for emerging players to steal market share, but also an opportunity for incumbents to keep a firm grip on theirs.

Join SAP Hybris at The Gathering, an exclusive union of the world’s bravest brands, in Banff on February 22-24. You can also register for the online-only SAP Hybris LIVE: Digital Summit happening on March 8.

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Shady Ghattas

About Shady Ghattas

Shady Ghattas is Customer Solution Director of SAP Hybris Canada (SAP). He is a digital transformation leader with a focus on customer experience from marketing to commerce.

SMBs: Seize The Moment! In Marketing, Timing Is Everything

Bernard Chung

What’s the dominant trend in marketing right now? Personalization. It’s the ability to identify customers and prospects, and capture enriched information on each individual to develop a deeper profile.

I believe there’s another major evolution right around the corner, which I call “marketing in the moment.” And no marketer can afford not to seize the opportunity.

From building the brand to building a relationship

To elaborate on this concept, let’s think about the evolution of marketing. Not long ago, companies were able to rely on the strength of their brand and on marketing to the masses. Marketers devoted most of their effort to building the brand. Consumers recognized “Coke,” for instance, and bought it.

Then Coca-Cola recognized that not everyone wanted a traditional Coke; some preferred caffeine-free, others wanted low-calorie and sugarless. Marketers began to differentiate their buyers, segmenting the different target audiences, tweaking the product offerings and the message and the advertising channel.

Today, marketers have refined this approach to the point of individualized interactions – because they can. Digital technology offers enormous power to capture and analyze behavioral data for deep insight into each customer’s intents and motivations.

The next wave: knowing when to engage

The idea of marketing in the moment is to deliver exactly the right message to a single individual – at exactly the right time. That’s not a green light to bombard the consumer at every moment, but instead to identify the right moment to have a discussion.

For example, if I call my bank to complain about an overdraft fee or report a lost ATM card, the representative would be ill-advised to pitch a product while I’m in that negative frame of mind. The rep doubtless has a few data points about me, and knows that I am currently considering remortgaging my house. But the context is wrong for trying to engage me in a discussion about refinancing.

Delivering instant response

The emerging model of customer engagement is known as “empathy marketing,” where the objective shifts to becoming empathetic to the individual. A key aspect of being empathetic is timing. There are moments in everyone’s life when they are open to influence and value information that meets their needs in that instant. And those needs change very fast.

To return to my banking example: I can do a Google search for information about refinancing, and very quickly identify a few companies I might do business with. Within seconds, my smartphone will buzz with a response from one or more of those sources with interest rates and terms.

If that information arrives the next day, it’s too late. Consumers today expect immediate gratification. They expect it not only for major financial decisions like this, but in their everyday activities: where to grab a pizza, get cash at an ATM, buy a Mother’s Day card, catch a screening of the latest 3D movie.

The three essential pillars for marketing in the moment

How is it possible to meet these expectations? Putting it simply, there are three fundamental pillars.

First is the ability to collect and analyze huge amounts of data and convert it to actionable insight. Since consumers use multiple channels to engage with organizations, the second pillar is to maintain a strong, consistent presence in all key marketing and commerce channels for a seamless customer journey from one channel to the other. This involves building a consolidated view of the customer across all relevant touchpoints to discover the customer’s real-time intent, and what information that person needs to move forward in the journey. The third pillar is the ability to work collaboratively within your organization to effectively manage and qualify leads, measure results, and make midcourse adjustments to your strategy on the fly.

Digital solutions designed for SMBs

Enabling this approach is what we call a digital core, which combines transactions and analytics on a single platform. Instead of relying on multiple applications for different processes, a single platform centralizes your customer data—CRM, financial information, and so on—and brings in external sources as well. Everything is connected: internally, marketing campaigns, sales data, and customer payment info, for example; and externally, the web, social media, and the Internet of Things. Powerful tools allow you to analyze and visualize enormous amounts of data to gain the type of insights I’ve described here.

While this approach may appear out of reach for small and midsize businesses, there are in fact digital solutions available – and economically accessible – that allow you to seize the marketing moment. And advisors are at the ready to support you with evaluation, implementation, industry-specific functionality, and ongoing services.

For more information, please visit the SAP S/4HANA Partner Packages site here.

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Bernard Chung

About Bernard Chung

Bernard Chung is Head of Audience Marketing for Marketing Line of Business at SAP Hybris.

3 Ways Robots Will Co-Evolve with Humans

Christopher Koch

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About Christopher Koch

Christopher Koch is the Editorial Director of the SAP Center for Business Insight. He is an experienced publishing professional, researcher, editor, and writer in business, technology, and B2B marketing. Share your thoughts with Chris on Twitter @Ckochster.

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Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

About Andre Smith

An Internet, Marketing and E-Commerce specialist with several years of experience in the industry. He has watched as the world of online business has grown and adapted to new technologies, and he has made it his mission to help keep businesses informed and up to date.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

About Neil Patrick

Neil Patrick is director of the GRC Center of Excellence in EMEA for SAP.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Ioana Sima

About Ioana Sima

Ioana Sima is an architecture student at Ion Mincu University of Architecture, CMO of DigitalWebProperties, coffee lover, and avid gamer. Despite my academic background, I decided to pursue a career in digital marketing. Why? Because it's thrilling, fascinating, and unpredictable. My goal is to contribute to the creation of something truly meaningful & to grow professionally. Follow me on Twitter if you enjoy gaming, dank memes, and digital marketing.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Bruce McCuaig

About Bruce McCuaig

Bruce McCuaig is director - Product Marketing at SAP GRC solutions. He is responsible for development and execution of the product marketing strategy for SAP Risk Management, SAP Audit Management and SAP solutions for three lines of defense. Bruce has extensive experience in industry as a finance professional, as a chief risk officer, and as a chief audit executive. He has written and spoken extensively on GRC topics and has worked with clients around the world implementing GRC solutions and technology.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

About Richard Howells

Richard Howells is a Vice President at SAP responsible for the positioning, messaging, AR , PR and go-to market activities for the SAP Supply Chain solutions.

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awareness