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How CIOs Can Lead Digitalization Of Consumer Products Industry

Don Gordon

If you attended CES 2017 last month or, like me, just watched the highlights, you were doubtless astounded by all the new consumer gadgets and products. There was a countertop machine that brews 5 liters of beer in a couple of hours; cordless, hands-free breast pumps; and an electric skateboard that goes up to 20 mph. (We can only hope that people have the good sense not to combine these activities.)

But for all the talk about consumer-facing digital innovations, for consumer products (CP) companies, many of the opportunities are less about product and more about business model and process. Whether it’s innovating a direct-to-consumer service or using the Internet of Things (IoT) to realize supply chain efficiencies, CIOs are expected to play a leading role in digital initiatives. How individual CIOs respond to the digital challenge will help determine their own success as well as that of their organization.

History is on the CIO’s side – but time is not

The opportunities presented by the new digital frontier are profound, and leading CP companies are beginning to respond accordingly. Those that do not risk being left out of increases in market share and consumer loyalty. In one sense, the move toward a new digital future comes at a perfect time for CIOs. As noted in a recent CIO.com article:

“In the past, the CIO and IT roles were mostly about … controlling costs, business processes [and back-office] support. … IT was never seen as a strategic part of the business. … That time is over.”

As the shift to digital accelerates, CIOs need to consider a bolder, more strategic approach to their work. This will mean asking important questions like these:

  • Are my IT goals and objectives fully aligned with the business strategy?
  • Do I have the right skills? Does my team?
  • Do I understand the emerging technologies and the best practices associated with them?
  • Is our IT function organized in order to maximize innovation?
  • How will we measure ROI?
  • Ensure continuous improvement?

What digital means for IT leaders

To take full advantage of digitalization, CP companies will need to transform business models and processes. CIOs and other IT leaders will need to adopt new roles and responsibilities. Instead of “keeping the lights on” and managing system integrations and implementations, IT leaders are expected to take a new, more strategic role in the C-suite.

Now is the time for IT leaders in CP to become digital transformation leaders, setting clear direction and objectives and articulating the linkage between overall business strategy and IT directives. This means IT leaders will need to shift away from a systems support role and take the lead in developing digital strategy. For some accustomed to a more reactive role, the change will be uncomfortable – but for those who embrace it, the rewards will be extensive.

The journey will not be without difficulty. A survey performed by EIU indicates that CP lags other industries in terms of LoB-IT collaboration on strategy. But if CP companies continue to rely solely on product innovation to drive growth, their more digitally savvy competitors will keep taking share.

A CIO road map in CP

The needs and opportunities may seem daunting, but there are some very specific steps that IT leaders in CP can and should take:

  1. Promote development of a digital vision and strategy. Most companies do not have, or have not considered, a vision for digital. CIOs must educate senior leaders and boards about the importance of digitalization, the impact on markets and the raw opportunity available.
  1. Build digital skills and capacity. CIOs have a unique advantage in digital strategy. They can begin to build the new IT platform for the new digital economy, and develop the skills to engage with the consumer.
  1. Be the architect. Apps and tools may be flashy, but the CIO should begin to hone an integrated, end-to-end process. That means taking a hard look at legacy infrastructure systems and making the bold (and often short-term expensive) choices that will clear the path for innovation.
  1. Adopt agile, flexible sourcing. To be effective, IT teams must be responsive to opportunities and demands. That means having flexible and agile operational models that can build, support, and drive digitalization.
  1. Help change the culture. Digitalization is happening at the speed of now. That means CIOs need to help organizations with internal processes that can operate in an omnichannel, consumer-focused quality-driven change process, not one that’s mired by calendars, committees, and restrictive controls.
  1. Manage risk. With the rapidity of change comes a need for a governance framework that is likely going to need to be different. Risk-averse governance can slow down innovation. CIOs need to lead a governance strategy that protects at the same time it propels.

Consumers are expecting new relationships with products. Products are still important – but today, what sets your company apart is the consumer experience you deliver. To win, you need to engage with consumers like never before. This means capitalizing on moments of opportunity to ensure better outcomes – all in a digital economy where interactions happen in an instant, decisions are made in the here and now, and insight is needed in real time.  This deep transformation in the CP industry requires a fundamental evolution in the role of the CIO and the board’s understanding of what IT now brings to the business.

For more insight on digitalization strategies, see Bringing The Four Degrees Of Digital Transformation To Life.

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About Don Gordon

Don Gordon leads global Consumer Products industry marketing for SAP. Previously he led global Retail industry marketing for IBM. He lives in Philadelphia, considered by many to be the finest city on earth.

Zhena’s Gypsy Tea Brews Sustainable Growth On Cloud ERP

David Trites

Recently I had the pleasure of hosting a podcast with Paula Muesse, COO and CFO of Zhena’s Gypsy Tea, a small, organic, fair-trade tea company based in California, and Ursula Ringham from SAP. We talked about some of the business challenges Zhena’s faces and how the company’s ERP solution helped spur growth and digital transformation.

Small but complex business

~ERP helped Zhena’s sustain growthZhena’s has grown from one person (Zhena Muzyka) selling hand-packed tea from a cart, into a thriving small business that puts quality, sustainability, and fair trade first. And although the company is small its business is complex.

For starters, tea isn’t grown in the United States, so Zhena’s has to maintain and import inventory from multiple warehouses around the world. Some of their tea blends have up to 14 ingredients, and each one has a different lead time. That makes demand-planning difficult. In addition, the FDA and US Customs require designated ingredients be traced and treated a certain way to comply with regulations.

Being organic and fair trade also makes things more complicated. Zhena’s has to pass an annual organic compliance audit for all products and processing facilities. And all products need to be traceable back to the farms where the tea was grown and picked to ensure the workers (mostly women) are paid fair wages.

Sustainable growth

Prior to implementing its new ERP system, Zhena’s was using a mix of tools like QuickBooks, Excel, and paper to manage the business. But to sustain growth and ensure future success, the company had to make some changes. Zhena’s needed an integrated software solution that could handle all facets of the business. It needed a tool that could help with cost control and profitability analysis and facilitate complex reporting and regulatory requirements.

The SAP Business ByDesign solution was the perfect choice. The cloud-based ERP solution reduced both business and IT costs, simplified processes from demand planning to accounting, and enabled mobile access and real-time reporting.

Check out the podcast to hear more about how Zhena’s successfully transformed its business by moving to SAP Business ByDesign.

 This article originally appeared on SAP Business Trends.

Building a successful company is hard work. SAP’s affordable solutions for small and midsize companies are designed to make it easier. Simple to install and use, SAP SME Solutions help you automate and integrate your business processes to give real-time, actionable insights. So you can make decisions on the spot. Find out how Run Simple can work for you. Visit sap.com/sme.

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About David Trites

David Trites is a Director of SAP Global Marketing. He is responsible for producing interesting and compelling customer stories that will humanize the SAP brand, support sales and marketing teams across SAP, and increase the awareness of SAP in key markets.

Haier Asia Builds A Digital Platform To Speed Innovation And Win Consumers’ Loyalty [VIDEO]

Dinesh Sharma

08 Apr 2013 --- Intersection, Germany. --- Image by © Markus Hanke/www.MarkusHanke.de/CorbisFew words scare the corporate world like the term “disruption.” No matter the language, disruption conjures the fear of dilution, alteration, and disturbance. And as the world becomes increasingly hyperconnected, disruption seems to be an ever-present threat.

Nevertheless, the C-suite is remaining vigilant by embracing the digital economy as the new reality. According to a recent study conducted by the Economist Intelligence Unit, 80% of executives view hyperconnectivity positively – indicating that it presents more opportunities than threats. All the while, they are carefully watching the competitive landscape and anticipating the arrival of overnight digital sensations and the inventiveness of long-time adversaries.

However, this is only one side of the transformational change hyperconnectivity is bringing. Disruption is not just happening on the corporate side of the consumer market – consumers are steadily disrupting everything a business touches.

The secret? Go beyond the competition to find disruptive opportunity

Not that long ago, most businesses followed a one-time transaction model. They would manufacture the product and ship it to the retailer, and consumers would purchase it. However, hyperconnectivity has changed the rules – making this experience a distant memory.

Consumers are more connected to information and no longer interested in listening corporate rhetoric. By drastically changing everything in our lives, the Internet is giving more power to the consumer, putting them in a position to guide the conversation and dictate product and service offerings. From this perspective, it is easy to see that hyperconnectivity and its impact on social behavior are the true disruptors.

Haier Asia, a top-ranking multinational consumer electronics and home appliances company, is one of those few companies that quickly recognized how hyperconnectivity is powering consumer-based disruption. “When you look around, no consumer life business is making money. Why is that? Margins are so slim,” cites Yoshiaki Ito, president and CEO of Haier Asia. “Consumers are far, far faster than manufacturers because they are getting new information on a daily basis. In the meantime, traditional companies produce their products – taking 24 months. So the gap is just widening every second.”

Instead of surrendering to these challenges, Haier decided to disrupt itself and the market it serves. With a two-prong approach to digital transformation, the company created a service-based model to seize the potential of new consumer behaviors and accelerate its product development cycles.

“My strategy for Haier Asia is to double up the digital platform. This is a great opportunity to bring us to the next level by becoming a services provider and gaining a steady stream of new revenue,” says Ito.

How did Haier take advantage of hyperconnectivity to gain the attention of stakeholders and consumers? Watch the video below to find out.

This article originally appeared on SAP Business Trends.

Want more insight on managing digital disruption? See Three Keys To Winning In A World Of Disruption.

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About Dinesh Sharma

Dinesh Sharma is the Vice President of Digital Economy at SAP. He is a GM-level technology executive with leadership, technical innovation, effective strategic planning, customer and partner engagement, turnaround management and focused operational execution experience at both large enterprise and startup companies. Share your thoughts with Dinesh on Twitter @sharmad

Taking Learning Back to School

Dan Wellers

 

Denmark spends most GDP on labor market programs at 3.3%.
The U.S. spends only 0.1% of it’s GDP on adult education and workforce retraining.
The number of post-secondary vocational and training institutions in China more than doubled from 2000 to 2014.
47% of U.S. jobs are at risk for automation.

Our overarching approach to education is top down, inflexible, and front loaded in life, and does not encourage collaboration.

Smartphone apps that gamify learning or deliver lessons in small bits of free time can be effective tools for teaching. However, they don’t address the more pressing issue that the future is digital and those whose skills are outmoded will be left behind.

Many companies have a history of effective partnerships with local schools to expand their talent pool, but these efforts are not designed to change overall systems of learning.


The Question We Must Answer

What will we do when digitization, automation, and artificial intelligence eject vast numbers of people from their current jobs, and they lack the skills needed to find new ones?

Solutions could include:

  • National and multinational adult education programs
  • Greater investment in technical and vocational schools
  • Increased emphasis on apprenticeships
  • Tax incentives for initiatives proven to close skills gaps

We need a broad, systemic approach that breaks businesses, schools, governments, and other organizations that target adult learners out of their silos so they can work together. Chief learning officers (CLOs) can spearhead this approach by working together to create goals, benchmarks, and strategy.

Advancing the field of learning will help every business compete in an increasingly global economy with a tight market for skills. More than this, it will mitigate the workplace risks and challenges inherent in the digital economy, thus positively influencing the future of business itself.


Download the executive brief Taking Learning Back to School.


Read the full article The Future of Learning – Keeping up With The Digital Economy

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About Dan Wellers

Dan Wellers is the Global Lead of Digital Futures at SAP, which explores how organizations can anticipate the future impact of exponential technologies. Dan has extensive experience in technology marketing and business strategy, plus management, consulting, and sales.

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Why Millennials Quit: Understanding A New Workforce

Shelly Kramer

Millennials are like mobile devices: they’re everywhere. You can’t visit a coffee shop without encountering both in large numbers. But after all, who doesn’t like a little caffeine with their connectivity? The point is that you should be paying attention to millennials now more than ever because they have surpassed Boomers and Gen-Xers as the largest generation.

Unfortunately for the workforce, they’re also the generation most likely to quit. Let’s examine a new report that sheds some light on exactly why that is—and what you can do to keep millennial employees working for you longer.

New workforce, new values

Deloitte found that two out of three millennials are expected to leave their current jobs by 2020. The survey also found that a staggering one in four would probably move on in the next year alone.

If you’re a business owner, consider putting four of your millennial employees in a room. Take a look around—one of them will be gone next year. Besides their skills and contributions, you’ve also lost time and resources spent by onboarding and training those employees—a very costly process. According to a new report from XYZ University, turnover costs U.S. companies a whopping $30.5 billion annually.

Let’s take a step back and look at this new workforce with new priorities and values.

Everything about millennials is different, from how to market to them as consumers to how you treat them as employees. The catalyst for this shift is the difference in what they value most. Millennials grew up with technology at their fingertips and are the most highly educated generation to date. Many have delayed marriage and/or parenthood in favor of pursuing their careers, which aren’t always about having a great paycheck (although that helps). Instead, it may be more that the core values of your business (like sustainability, for example) or its mission are the reasons that millennials stick around at the same job or look for opportunities elsewhere. Consider this: How invested are they in their work? Are they bored? What does their work/life balance look like? Do they have advancement opportunities?

Ping-pong tables and bringing your dog to work might be trendy, but they aren’t the solution to retaining a millennial workforce. So why exactly are they quitting? Let’s take a look at the data.

Millennials’ common reasons for quitting

In order to gain more insight into the problem of millennial turnover, XYZ University surveyed more than 500 respondents between the ages of 21 and 34 years old. There was a good mix of men and women, college grads versus high school grads, and entry-level employees versus managers. We’re all dying to know: Why did they quit? Here are the most popular reasons, some in their own words:

  • Millennials are risk-takers. XYZ University attributes this affection for risk taking with the fact that millennials essentially came of age during the recession. Surveyed millennials reported this experience made them wary of spending decades working at one company only to be potentially laid off.
  • They are focused on education. More than one-third of millennials hold college degrees. Those seeking advanced degrees can find themselves struggling to finish school while holding down a job, necessitating odd hours or more than one part-time gig. As a whole, this generation is entering the job market later, with higher degrees and higher debt.
  • They don’t want just any job—they want one that fits. In an age where both startups and seasoned companies are enjoying success, there is no shortage of job opportunities. As such, they’re often looking for one that suits their identity and their goals, not just the one that comes up first in an online search. Interestingly, job fit is often prioritized over job pay for millennials. Don’t forget, if they have to start their own company, they will—the average age for millennial entrepreneurs is 27.
  • They want skills that make them competitive. Many millennials enjoy the challenge that accompanies competition, so wearing many hats at a position is actually a good thing. One millennial journalist who used to work at Forbes reported that millennials want to learn by “being in the trenches, and doing it alongside the people who do it best.”
  • They want to do something that matters. Millennials have grown up with change, both good and bad, so they’re unafraid of making changes in their own lives to pursue careers that align with their desire to make a difference.
  • They prefer flexibility. Technology today means it’s possible to work from essentially anywhere that has an Internet connection, so many millennials expect at least some level of flexibility when it comes to their employer. Working remotely all of the time isn’t feasible for every situation, of course, but millennials expect companies to be flexible enough to allow them to occasionally dictate their own schedules. If they have no say in their workday, that’s a red flag.
  • They’ve got skills—and they want to use them. In the words of a 24-year-old designer, millennials “don’t need to print copies all day.” Many have paid (or are in the midst of paying) for their own education, and they’re ready and willing to put it to work. Most would prefer you leave the smaller tasks to the interns.
  • They got a better offer. Thirty-five percent of respondents to XYZ’s survey said they quit a previous job because they received a better opportunity. That makes sense, especially as recruiting is made simpler by technology. (Hello, LinkedIn.)
  • They seek mentors. Millennials are used to being supervised, as many were raised by what have been dubbed as “helicopter parents.” Receiving support from those in charge is the norm, not the anomaly, for this generation, and they expect that in the workplace, too.

Note that it’s not just XYZ University making this final point about the importance of mentoring. Consider Figures 1 and 2 from Deloitte, proving that millennials with worthwhile mentors report high satisfaction rates in other areas, such as personal development. As you can see, this can trickle down into employee satisfaction and ultimately result in higher retention numbers.

Millennials and Mentors
Figure 1. Source: Deloitte


Figure 2. Source: Deloitte

Failure to . . .

No, not communicate—I would say “engage.” On second thought, communication plays a role in that, too. (Who would have thought “Cool Hand Luke” would be applicable to this conversation?)

Data from a recent Gallup poll reiterates that millennials are “job-hoppers,” also pointing out that most of them—71 percent, to be exact—are either not engaged in or are actively disengaged from the workplace. That’s a striking number, but businesses aren’t without hope. That same Gallup poll found that millennials who reported they are engaged at work were 26 percent less likely than their disengaged counterparts to consider switching jobs, even with a raise of up to 20 percent. That’s huge. Furthermore, if the market improves in the next year, those engaged millennial employees are 64 percent less likely to job-hop than those who report feeling actively disengaged.

What’s next?

I’ve covered a lot in this discussion, but here’s what I hope you will take away: Millennials comprise a majority of the workforce, but they’re changing how you should look at hiring, recruiting, and retention as a whole. What matters to millennials matters to your other generations of employees, too. Mentoring, compensation, flexibility, and engagement have always been important, but thanks to the vocal millennial generation, we’re just now learning exactly how much.

What has been your experience with millennials and turnover? Are you a millennial who has recently left a job or are currently looking for a new position? If so, what are you missing from your current employer, and what are you looking for in a prospective one? Alternatively, if you’re reading this from a company perspective, how do you think your organization stacks up in the hearts and minds of your millennial employees? Do you have plans to do anything differently? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

For more insight on millennials and the workforce, see Multigenerational Workforce? Collaboration Tech Is The Key To Success.

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