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Step-By-Step, How-To Guide To Digital Transformation

Florian Wagner

OK, maybe this headline exaggerated. There probably is no one step-by-step guide to digital transformation, but it’s safe to say that a thorough evaluation of five clearly defined areas can help companies assess digital business readiness based on a Digital Business Innovation framework developed by Digital Bridge Partners & SAP. This assessment of the key elements we have observed in successful digital innovation stories serves to identify strengths, weaknesses, gaps, and opportunities on the road to digital transformation.

A framework for success

The Digital Business Innovation (DBI) framework is a system of assessing the CIO’s and IT’s readiness for, and progress along, a digital transformation journey.

The framework consists of four pillars supported by DBI leadership:

  1. Define a digital strategy to raise awareness, set direction, and drive decision making
  2. Apply a best practice organizational innovation model and culture, including agile solution development processes to drive digital business value
  3. Establish a collaborative and agile IT operating model that allows for incubation of new approaches
  4. Deliver the right platforms ‒ technical and commercial ‒ to support enterprise-wide transformation and innovation required by digital business model changes

 Where should your digital transformation start?

According to the 2015 MIT Center for Information Systems Research survey, board members think that 32% of company revenues will be threatened by digital disruption by 2020. This should create a sense of urgency in any company. But preparing for transformation requires clarity in two areas: a strategy that outlines the scope, depth, and size of the change needed to realize your goals, and an assessment of what is required in terms of culture, capacity, leadership, models, and tools.

Many digital maturity assessments exist, but most are quite complex and time consuming, or lead toward a specific vendor’s solution. However, this assessment was designed to bring quick, clear focus to proven key success factors. The sample assessment questions below are a starting point for the conversations we have with technology leaders across a range of industries, so they are necessarily high-level. This approach focuses efforts on the degree to which maturity has been achieved and identifying strategic next steps rather than simplistic, tactical snapshots of the status quo.

The assessment

1. Leadership

  • To what degree do the CIO and IT recognize the importance of leading/driving a digital business innovation agenda?
  • To what degree is the CIO a key leader of digital business innovation?
  • How mature is IT’s drive of the digital business innovation function and culture?

2. Digital strategy

  • How well defined is the company-wide, CEO/board-driven business transformation agenda?
  • To what degree has the company committed to a comprehensive digital strategy that is aligned with your business transformation agenda?
  • To what degree does your leadership have a clear portfolio management approach to evaluate the risks and rewards of digital transformation?

3. Innovation model

  • To what degree do business peers look to IT as their co-innovation partner?
  • To what degree does your innovation model work enterprise-wide through agile, cross-functional teams working a well-managed portfolio of innovations?
  • To what degree is your organization ahead of competitors in its ability to leverage technology to drive innovation and financial results in both business processes and business models?

4. IT operations

  • To what degree has IT built a roadmap to close its tools and skills gaps between what is required and what is in place today to deliver on your digital strategy?
  • To what degree do business teams leverage IT’s tools and skills to drive digital business innovation?
  • To what degree does IT blend security, reliability, openness, and agility to support both ongoing operations and innovation work?

5. Platform

  • To what degree does IT have the end-to-end technical and commercial platforms required to facilitate effective digital transformation?
  • To what degree does IT have a clear plan for developing the technology platforms (owning or joining industry platforms, Big Data analytics, and APIs) required to facilitate value creation across your entire ecosystem?
  • To what degree is your organization clear about its relationship to the platform business models emerging in your value ecosystem (own, co-develop, join, counter)?

If a far more granular view would be helpful, use SAP’s Digital Innovation and Transformation Assessment.

Comments

Florian Wagner

About Florian Wagner

Florian Wagner is marketing director for IT audience messaging at SAP. Together with his team, he is responsible to address the IT audience and to drive relevant thought leadership topics. He writes about technology trends on digital transformation, cloud and platform strategies with a focus on customer experiences.

When It Comes To Transformation, Simple Is Always Best, Get Going, And Move Quickly

Florian Wagner

Many digital maturity assessments exist, but most are quite complex and time consuming or lead toward a specific vendor’s solution. We propose an alternative, much simpler approach, designed to bring quick, clear focus to proven key success factors.

We have found these are particularly useful in executive workshop settings (from large industrial companies, to technology companies, to consumer goods and media players) where the leadership team is trying to gain alignment on whether and how to proceed. The simple assessment questions below are a starting point for the conversations we have with leaders across a range of industries, so are necessarily high-level. The approach focuses efforts on the degree to which maturity has been achieved and strategic actions and next steps, rather than simplistic, tactical snapshots of the status quo. The approach can also serve as a basis for supporting the organizational behavior change many of our clients seek in parallel with their digital transformation.

Leadership

  • To what degree do the CIO and IT recognize the importance of leading/driving a digital business innovation agenda?
  • To what degree is the CIO a key leader of digital business innovation?
  • How mature is IT’s drive of the digital business innovation function and culture?

Digital strategy

  • How well defined is the company-wide, CEO or board-driven business transformation agenda?
  • To what degree has the company committed to a comprehensive digital strategy that is aligned with your business transformation agenda?
  • To what degree does your leadership have a clear portfolio management approach to evaluate the risks and rewards of digital transformation?

Innovation model

  • To what degree do business peers look to IT as their co-innovation partner?
  • To what degree does your innovation model work enterprise-wide through agile, cross-functional teams with a well-managed portfolio of innovations?
  • To what degree is your organization ahead of competitors in its ability to leverage technology to drive innovation and financial results in both business processes and business models?

IT operations

  • To what degree has IT built a roadmap to close its tools and skills gaps between what is required and what is in place today to deliver on your digital strategy?
  • To what degree do business teams leverage IT’s tools and skills to drive digital business innovation ?
  • To what degree does IT blend security, reliability, openness, and agility to support both ongoing operations and innovation?

Platform

  • To what degree does IT have the end-to-end technical and commercial platforms required to facilitate effective digital transformation?
  • To what degree does IT have a clear plan for developing the technology platforms (owning or joining industry platforms, Big Data analytics, and APIs) required to facilitate value creation across your entire ecosystem?
  • To what degree is your organization clear about its relationship to the platform business models emerging in your value ecosystem (own, co-develop, join, counter)?

To ensure long-term success, reassess the factors at the appropriate levels (departmental, enterprise-wide) and cadences (monthly, quarterly, bi-annually).

There are two reasons for keeping this assessment at a very high level at this stage. First, the key to success in digital business innovation is quickly cycling through the build, measure, and learn loop. Assessment is key to the measuring and learning steps. By making the assessment simple, we hope to dramatically increase the frequency of assessment and the speed of your build-measure-learn loop.

Second, a high-level assessment will help CIOs focus their thinking and activity on strategic change rather than on business as usual (often as a tactical service provider to the enterprise). This regular zooming out to gain perspective and clarity is key to the long-term success of digital business leadership.

Benefits of the assessment

In summary, by working through these questions, the assessment can:

  1. Help CIOs begin and manage their transformation journey based on industry best practices and field research
  1. Establish a common, benchmarked framework to clarify the requirements for successful digital transformation
  1. Identify investment opportunities for CIOs to explore in establishing digital business leadership
  1. Define a roadmap and order of operations
  1. Help identify go-forward activities, starting with those that directly drive the final results and those that will require partnership and collaboration

If a far more granular view would be helpful, use SAP’s Digital Innovation and Transformation Assessment.

Comments

Florian Wagner

About Florian Wagner

Florian Wagner is marketing director for IT audience messaging at SAP. Together with his team, he is responsible to address the IT audience and to drive relevant thought leadership topics. He writes about technology trends on digital transformation, cloud and platform strategies with a focus on customer experiences.

Meteo Protect CEO Gabriel Gross: Digitalization Tackles The Last Unmanaged Insurance Risk

Verena Wiszinski

Warm or cold. Wet or dry. Windy or calm. Weather impacts everyone and almost every industry, influencing mood, sales decisions, and activities. With even the most seemingly small variation in temperature, precipitation, or change in wind speed, there is always a potential for major financial implications in sales, revenues, and losses. In fact, US$2 trillion dollars, or 3.5%, of the world’s GDP, can be lost each year due to unexpected weather variations that influence resource supplies and demand for goods and services. Approximately 90% of the world’s 570 million farms (just one of many weather-sensitive business sectors) run the risk of sacrificing up to 50% of their revenue when the weather is too cold or too mild in any given year.

Gabriel Gross, CEO of Meteo Protect, thought that it was absurd for the weather to remain an unpredictable and largely unmanageable insurance risk. Passionate about technology innovation, he decided to invest in the development of a solution that maps large volumes of weather and financial data to define how weather affects a business and test the effect that even the smallest variation from what is considered seasonal weather conditions has on cash flow, profit, and losses.

I had the great fortune to spend some time recently with Gross. We discussed how increased digitalization is changing the insurance customer experience and what role IT teams should play to drive improved predictability and insight.

gabriel gossHow is digital technology transforming the insurance industry and the customers it serves?

Digital transformation is profoundly impacting the insurance industry. Clients are increasingly demanding customized services because they are experiencing increased competition. In turn, insurers are expected to provide accurate and thorough risk analysis, which is the key to providing better pricing. This capability is not just an option that makes clients feel good about doing business with the insurer. It’s about keeping them engaged by offering the level of value they need to stay competitive, namely real-time intelligence that cannot be obtained anywhere else.

This is why we created Meteo Protect. As a fintech company, we have captured that specific value by collecting and processing weather-related data quickly and efficiently. Banks and insurers partner with us to get these insights, which can help them become a competitive player. Without this information, assessing weather risks would continue to be complex, and proactive decision-making helps to minimize related loss in revenue, mindshare, and market share.

For example, our underwriting and pricing platform, Vivaldi, produces real-time risk assessment and hedging solutions using a global weather database. Available as a mobile app, it aggregates weather-related data, analyzes risks, and prices and underwrites policies based on clients’ specifications. This technology enables insurers to sustainably produce a customer experience that is efficient, cost-effective, and fully customized to their unique needs and risk profile. Clients are now empowered to choose their own parameters, purchase individualized products, and agree with transparent pricing terms.

More importantly, the insurance industry is changing. Insurance companies are reducing costs and generating insights that could save businesses – their own and their clients.’ Simultaneously, the role of IT is now at the center of the value that the insurer provides.

Your IT organization plays an integral part of driving digital transformation success for Meteo Protect. How has your IT team evolved to fulfill their new role?

From the beginning, we hired highly skilled, highly educated, and highly reliable technologists. Eventually, we grew to have two separate IT teams: a group of data and weather science experts and a traditional technology staff. Over time, we decided to merge them together because we felt that our data science capabilities – which is our core business – couldn’t progress without the integrated expertise of our technology workforce.

Recently, we decided to move our data, except for client information, to the cloud. This strategic move has increased security and cost predictability. Plus, it allows us to scale our IT operations as we continue to grow and handle more data.

For the insurance industry, customer experience can mean the difference between growth and decline. What should insurers – and digital startups like yourself – consider when they decide to touch this central aspect of digitalization?

The biggest challenge is defining the customer experience itself. Digital transformation journeys are long and complicated, and it’s hard to know which experiential elements are key to the client. Never is a solution created and never upgraded. It’s an evolutionary process as we find ways to improve insights, value, and overall adoption. We don’t do this daily, but I can say that regular updates are made monthly. It’s critical to operate along the fine line between the customer experience and business longevity.

It is also crucial to realign processes and business models with the client’s digital journey. Sometimes, the technology prompts a change in the market or other external players. Other times, it’s the market that triggers an update to match the technology to new ways of working and emerging opportunities.

From my perspective, the IT area is an integral part of both challenges. Often, IT is evolving with new technology that is being developed to fit the reality of ever-changing user needs and requirements. But, there are moments when it ignites a wave of transformation that adds immense value to our business, our clients, and our clients’ clients.

One last piece of advice for anyone looking to begin their digital transformation: get a firm understanding of the digital strategy. Executives must ask themselves whether the goal is to transform the entire company, modernize a particular organization, or completely change an entire industry. In addition, a general understanding of the priorities and pressures within the IT team is essential to understand the level of management and technical capacity that can be afforded to support such a change. And last, but certainly not least, it is essential that the IT leader partners with all affected business functions and engages in consistent, two-way dialogue about business needs and challenges and the possible solutions that can resolve them.

Learn more about mining Data – The Hidden Treasure Inside Your Business.

Comments

Verena Wiszinski

About Verena Wiszinski

Verena Wiszinski is a Senior Integrated Marketing Specialist within the Global IT Audience Marketing team at SAP. She enjoys staying connected with customers and thought leaders and talking first hand with them about their experiences, thoughts, and needs within business transformation.

3 Ways Robots Will Co-Evolve with Humans

Christopher Koch

Comments

Christopher Koch

About Christopher Koch

Christopher Koch is the Editorial Director of the SAP Center for Business Insight. He is an experienced publishing professional, researcher, editor, and writer in business, technology, and B2B marketing. Share your thoughts with Chris on Twitter @Ckochster.

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Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Hans Thalbauer

About Hans Thalbauer

Hans Thalbauer is the Senior Vice President, Extended Supply Chain, at SAP. He is responsible for the strategic direction and the Go-To-Market of solutions for Supply Chain, Logistics, Engineering/R&D, Manufacturing, Asset Management and Sustainability at SAP.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Melissa Friedman

About Melissa Friedman

Melissa Friedman is a senior marketing manager of Global Partner Operations at SAP. She manages SAP Virtual Agency, a multi-language, online demand-generation platform for SAP partners. In her spare time, Melissa is a professional photographer who specializes in wedding, bar/bat mitzvah, and portrait photography. Follow Melissa on Twitter and LinkedIn, or view her photography work.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Adam Winfield

About Adam Winfield

Adam Winfield writes about technology, how it's affecting industries, how it's affecting businesses, and how it's affecting people.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Gavin Mooney

About Gavin Mooney

Gavin Mooney is a utilities industry solution specialist for SAP. From a background in Engineering and IT, Gavin has been working in the utilities industry with SAP products for nearly 15 years. He has had the privilege of working with a number of Electricity, Gas and Water Utilities across the globe to implement SAP’s Industry Solution for Utilities. He now works with utilities to help them identify the best way to run simple and run better with SAP's latest products. Gavin loves to network and build lasting business relationships and is passionate about cleantech and the fundamental transformation currently shaking up the utilities industry.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Kris Hansen

About Kris Hansen

Kris Hansen is senior principal, Financial Services for SAP Canada. He is focused on understanding the financial services industry and identifying new and interesting digital opportunities that create disruptive business value.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Wilson Zhu

About Wilson Zhu

Wilson Zhu is a Marketing Manager at SAP. He focuses on the topic of Digital Supply Chain and IoT. Follow him on Twitter: @thezhu.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Roger Noia

About Roger Noia

Roger Noia is the director of Solution Marketing, SAP Jam Collaboration, at SAP. He is responsible for product marketing and sales enablement for our dedicated sales team as well as the broader SAP sales force selling SAP Jam.

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

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awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

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Drew Schiller

About Drew Schiller

Drew Schiller co-founded and serves as the Chief Executive Officer of Validic, the leading digital health platform for connecting patient-generated data from apps, wearables, and in-home medical devices to the healthcare system. At Validic, Drew leads the corporate strategy, drives key day-to-day initiatives, and works closely with senior executives at partner organizations to stay ahead of the innovation curve.

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awareness