Sections

Disrupt With Digitization

Sven Denecken

Innovation requires reimagined processes – and the CIO needs to lead this transformation.

Enterprises today must be prepared for the transformation that the digital economy is forcing upon them.

Now, you might think, “Another digital buzzword article.” Well, yes, some dismiss it as a buzzword, but the challenge for many has just started. But let’s not look at only the problems; there are opportunities if seized right – and you can win big.

For example, competing for new business, or even exploring a new revenue stream by creating a new business model, are things you need to look out for constantly – and for sure you can learn from startups, because that is what they do: challenge the status quo. In a fast-moving digital economy, the window to capture these opportunities closes quickly; companies that are unprepared to pounce when occasions arise will likely get stuck on the road to irrelevance. In my job as product manager, my team constantly screens such opportunities, as innovation needs to be weighted fast and implemented via co-innovation even faster if there is a chance of success – and it must also be adapted fast if reality kicks in.

Successful companies need to be willing to change: They must assess whether they are truly in a position to reinvent business processes every day, not just every generation. And here is where the modern CIO comes in. Yes, digital officers arise at every corner of every industry, and they are needed ambassadors or agents of change. But today I think we should be clear: If every company will soon be a “software” company (which I very much believe, as data will rule the world) you need a modern chief information (and innovation) officer to help business and the company board of directors to make this change happen.

Here are 3 key lessons we have learned from the CIOs we constantly speak with during our co-innovation work. (Of course, there are also many lessons we learn from CIOs who are not embracing it – but will they still be CIO next year?)

Lesson #1: Four trends to check if you are on track

As I stated earlier, there are four inescapable trends are creating the pressures that shape today’s digital transformation:

  • The empowered customer: Whether your customers are Generation Z consumers or multi-national conglomerates, they all share one vitally important characteristic: Each demands to be treated as a unique segment of one. You have no choice but to meet that expectation.
  • Competitive and regulatory pressures: Transparency is a necessary part of business today, and that means competitors and regulators alike can dissect any business process. Staying ahead of the former and meeting the standards of the latter requires operational excellence and accountability at every step in the value cycle.
  • Globalization: More businesses today must be prepared to go global in order to remain relevant. Expanding into new markets can no longer be done effectively with costly, infrastructure-heavy international build-outs. Enterprises need a pay-as-you-go strategy with scalable capacity, which can be adjusted rapidly to meet market conditions in any region.
  • Technological progress: The tide of innovations and discoveries is unrelenting. Businesses must be agile enough to quickly adopt new strategies, and be steered by insightful, knowledgeable leadership that can sort winning inventions from dead-end novelties.

Lesson #2: Unprecedented levels of business agility

The need for an unprecedented level of business agility to match the rapid pace of innovation and transformation present in business is not restricted to a particular industry. Rather, we see entire markets, including transportation, logistics, and e-commerce, being reinvented on a seemingly daily basis. For any industry in which the production, shipment, and transaction of a product is still relevant, transformation supported by digitization is fast becoming a necessity.

Pressures to reshape the business using a digital template are likewise common across the industry spectrum. Companies — both in the business-to-business (B2B) and business-to-consumer (B2C) worlds — expect personalized interactions as a “segment of one,” which necessitates individualization of products and services, and freedom of choice. The business has no choice but to meet these demands — on the platform the customer chooses — or risk losing customers to a competitor.

The common solution that addresses these pressures is agility, and the way to achieve that agility is with a flexible, digital core at the heart of every organization that can meet the demands presented by increasing across-the-board disruption.

In my presentations I often state why we need to talk about a digital core: As long as something is produced (even if it is a service), as long as something is delivered or shipped, and as long as something will be paid – there is a need for a core. It is as simple as that. Every CIO surely knows that end-to-end processes often start at the edges or with systems of engagement, but they are of limited value if they do not connect with the core – the heart that makes your company run.

Now building on top of this, with a digital core, organizations can do far more than simply meet these pressures at a minimum level of success. They can pivot in near real time to capitalize on innovations in areas such as cloud, Big Data, and business network connectivity to completely transform the business, whether it’s to keep up with the growing influence of emerging topics such as the Internet of Things (IoT), 3D printing, or augmented reality, or to defend against new competitors launching up all around them.

A digital core is an enabling platform for transformation and innovation, but what are its hallmarks? We find five key characteristics that make up a digital core:

  1. A digital core provides the enterprise with the capability to drive and anticipate business outcomes in real time.
  2.  It integrates the business seamlessly across all value chain processes such as client interaction, administration, production, and research and development.
  3.  The digital core increases efficiency by automating processes and distributing responsibility for customer insights across an intelligent business network.
  4. It increases effectiveness by converting signals in business data into tangible action, essentially bringing Big Data to the size and scale needed to turn insight into action for the everyday user.
  5. The digital core increases enterprise agility by elevating each employee’s view of the organization.

So how can the modern CIO help to disrupt with digitization?

Here is the modern CIO’s plan for success: They prioritize day-to-day operations that were formerly siloed lines of business to have complete visibility into the entire core business of the enterprise. Finance, sales, and manufacturing can then act in concert, basing decisions on the same information in real time. This is where the company wins big, and this is how the modern CIO will drive change for the better and help their company win in the digital economy.

Successful CIOs know that the race to digitization is on. Until recently, many of the clients I spoke with were still questioning the need for digitizing the enterprise. Now, they want to know the most efficient route to get there. And while SAP’s digital core S/4HANA Enterprise Management is certainly a monumental milestone, clients are surprised to discover that arriving at a digital core is not as difficult as it might seem to enable this level of transformation.

A digital core helps any business run faster and simpler, so getting there should not be as complicated as the siloed line-of-business applications and redundancies a business leaves behind.

Want more insight on digitization? See The Digitized Core At The Heart Of Reimagined Business.

Looking forward to your feedback! Follow me for the latest updates: @SDenecken (link to Twitter account).

Comments

Sven Denecken

About Sven Denecken

Sven Denecken is Senior Vice President, Product Management and Co-Innovation of SAP S/4HANA, at SAP. His experience working with customers and partners for decades and networking with the SAP field organization and industry analysts allows him to bring client issues and challenges directly into the solution development process, ensuring that next-generation software solutions address customer requirements to focus on business outcome and help customers gain competitive advantage. Connect with Sven on Twitter @SDenecken or e-mail at sven.denecken@sap.com.

When It Comes To Transformation, Simple Is Always Best, Get Going, And Move Quickly

Florian Wagner

Many digital maturity assessments exist, but most are quite complex and time consuming or lead toward a specific vendor’s solution. We propose an alternative, much simpler approach, designed to bring quick, clear focus to proven key success factors.

We have found these are particularly useful in executive workshop settings (from large industrial companies, to technology companies, to consumer goods and media players) where the leadership team is trying to gain alignment on whether and how to proceed. The simple assessment questions below are a starting point for the conversations we have with leaders across a range of industries, so are necessarily high-level. The approach focuses efforts on the degree to which maturity has been achieved and strategic actions and next steps, rather than simplistic, tactical snapshots of the status quo. The approach can also serve as a basis for supporting the organizational behavior change many of our clients seek in parallel with their digital transformation.

Leadership

  • To what degree do the CIO and IT recognize the importance of leading/driving a digital business innovation agenda?
  • To what degree is the CIO a key leader of digital business innovation?
  • How mature is IT’s drive of the digital business innovation function and culture?

Digital strategy

  • How well defined is the company-wide, CEO or board-driven business transformation agenda?
  • To what degree has the company committed to a comprehensive digital strategy that is aligned with your business transformation agenda?
  • To what degree does your leadership have a clear portfolio management approach to evaluate the risks and rewards of digital transformation?

Innovation model

  • To what degree do business peers look to IT as their co-innovation partner?
  • To what degree does your innovation model work enterprise-wide through agile, cross-functional teams with a well-managed portfolio of innovations?
  • To what degree is your organization ahead of competitors in its ability to leverage technology to drive innovation and financial results in both business processes and business models?

IT operations

  • To what degree has IT built a roadmap to close its tools and skills gaps between what is required and what is in place today to deliver on your digital strategy?
  • To what degree do business teams leverage IT’s tools and skills to drive digital business innovation ?
  • To what degree does IT blend security, reliability, openness, and agility to support both ongoing operations and innovation?

Platform

  • To what degree does IT have the end-to-end technical and commercial platforms required to facilitate effective digital transformation?
  • To what degree does IT have a clear plan for developing the technology platforms (owning or joining industry platforms, Big Data analytics, and APIs) required to facilitate value creation across your entire ecosystem?
  • To what degree is your organization clear about its relationship to the platform business models emerging in your value ecosystem (own, co-develop, join, counter)?

To ensure long-term success, reassess the factors at the appropriate levels (departmental, enterprise-wide) and cadences (monthly, quarterly, bi-annually).

There are two reasons for keeping this assessment at a very high level at this stage. First, the key to success in digital business innovation is quickly cycling through the build, measure, and learn loop. Assessment is key to the measuring and learning steps. By making the assessment simple, we hope to dramatically increase the frequency of assessment and the speed of your build-measure-learn loop.

Second, a high-level assessment will help CIOs focus their thinking and activity on strategic change rather than on business as usual (often as a tactical service provider to the enterprise). This regular zooming out to gain perspective and clarity is key to the long-term success of digital business leadership.

Benefits of the assessment

In summary, by working through these questions, the assessment can:

  1. Help CIOs begin and manage their transformation journey based on industry best practices and field research
  1. Establish a common, benchmarked framework to clarify the requirements for successful digital transformation
  1. Identify investment opportunities for CIOs to explore in establishing digital business leadership
  1. Define a roadmap and order of operations
  1. Help identify go-forward activities, starting with those that directly drive the final results and those that will require partnership and collaboration

If a far more granular view would be helpful, use SAP’s Digital Innovation and Transformation Assessment.

Comments

Florian Wagner

About Florian Wagner

Florian Wagner is marketing director for IT audience messaging at SAP. Together with his team, he is responsible to address the IT audience and to drive relevant thought leadership topics. He writes about technology trends on digital transformation, cloud and platform strategies with a focus on customer experiences.

Meteo Protect CEO Gabriel Gross: Digitalization Tackles The Last Unmanaged Insurance Risk

Verena Wiszinski

Warm or cold. Wet or dry. Windy or calm. Weather impacts everyone and almost every industry, influencing mood, sales decisions, and activities. With even the most seemingly small variation in temperature, precipitation, or change in wind speed, there is always a potential for major financial implications in sales, revenues, and losses. In fact, US$2 trillion dollars, or 3.5%, of the world’s GDP, can be lost each year due to unexpected weather variations that influence resource supplies and demand for goods and services. Approximately 90% of the world’s 570 million farms (just one of many weather-sensitive business sectors) run the risk of sacrificing up to 50% of their revenue when the weather is too cold or too mild in any given year.

Gabriel Gross, CEO of Meteo Protect, thought that it was absurd for the weather to remain an unpredictable and largely unmanageable insurance risk. Passionate about technology innovation, he decided to invest in the development of a solution that maps large volumes of weather and financial data to define how weather affects a business and test the effect that even the smallest variation from what is considered seasonal weather conditions has on cash flow, profit, and losses.

I had the great fortune to spend some time recently with Gross. We discussed how increased digitalization is changing the insurance customer experience and what role IT teams should play to drive improved predictability and insight.

gabriel gossHow is digital technology transforming the insurance industry and the customers it serves?

Digital transformation is profoundly impacting the insurance industry. Clients are increasingly demanding customized services because they are experiencing increased competition. In turn, insurers are expected to provide accurate and thorough risk analysis, which is the key to providing better pricing. This capability is not just an option that makes clients feel good about doing business with the insurer. It’s about keeping them engaged by offering the level of value they need to stay competitive, namely real-time intelligence that cannot be obtained anywhere else.

This is why we created Meteo Protect. As a fintech company, we have captured that specific value by collecting and processing weather-related data quickly and efficiently. Banks and insurers partner with us to get these insights, which can help them become a competitive player. Without this information, assessing weather risks would continue to be complex, and proactive decision-making helps to minimize related loss in revenue, mindshare, and market share.

For example, our underwriting and pricing platform, Vivaldi, produces real-time risk assessment and hedging solutions using a global weather database. Available as a mobile app, it aggregates weather-related data, analyzes risks, and prices and underwrites policies based on clients’ specifications. This technology enables insurers to sustainably produce a customer experience that is efficient, cost-effective, and fully customized to their unique needs and risk profile. Clients are now empowered to choose their own parameters, purchase individualized products, and agree with transparent pricing terms.

More importantly, the insurance industry is changing. Insurance companies are reducing costs and generating insights that could save businesses – their own and their clients.’ Simultaneously, the role of IT is now at the center of the value that the insurer provides.

Your IT organization plays an integral part of driving digital transformation success for Meteo Protect. How has your IT team evolved to fulfill their new role?

From the beginning, we hired highly skilled, highly educated, and highly reliable technologists. Eventually, we grew to have two separate IT teams: a group of data and weather science experts and a traditional technology staff. Over time, we decided to merge them together because we felt that our data science capabilities – which is our core business – couldn’t progress without the integrated expertise of our technology workforce.

Recently, we decided to move our data, except for client information, to the cloud. This strategic move has increased security and cost predictability. Plus, it allows us to scale our IT operations as we continue to grow and handle more data.

For the insurance industry, customer experience can mean the difference between growth and decline. What should insurers – and digital startups like yourself – consider when they decide to touch this central aspect of digitalization?

The biggest challenge is defining the customer experience itself. Digital transformation journeys are long and complicated, and it’s hard to know which experiential elements are key to the client. Never is a solution created and never upgraded. It’s an evolutionary process as we find ways to improve insights, value, and overall adoption. We don’t do this daily, but I can say that regular updates are made monthly. It’s critical to operate along the fine line between the customer experience and business longevity.

It is also crucial to realign processes and business models with the client’s digital journey. Sometimes, the technology prompts a change in the market or other external players. Other times, it’s the market that triggers an update to match the technology to new ways of working and emerging opportunities.

From my perspective, the IT area is an integral part of both challenges. Often, IT is evolving with new technology that is being developed to fit the reality of ever-changing user needs and requirements. But, there are moments when it ignites a wave of transformation that adds immense value to our business, our clients, and our clients’ clients.

One last piece of advice for anyone looking to begin their digital transformation: get a firm understanding of the digital strategy. Executives must ask themselves whether the goal is to transform the entire company, modernize a particular organization, or completely change an entire industry. In addition, a general understanding of the priorities and pressures within the IT team is essential to understand the level of management and technical capacity that can be afforded to support such a change. And last, but certainly not least, it is essential that the IT leader partners with all affected business functions and engages in consistent, two-way dialogue about business needs and challenges and the possible solutions that can resolve them.

Learn more about mining Data – The Hidden Treasure Inside Your Business.

Comments

Verena Wiszinski

About Verena Wiszinski

Verena Wiszinski is a Senior Integrated Marketing Specialist within the Global IT Audience Marketing team at SAP. She enjoys staying connected with customers and thought leaders and talking first hand with them about their experiences, thoughts, and needs within business transformation.

3 Ways Robots Will Co-Evolve with Humans

Christopher Koch

Comments

Christopher Koch

About Christopher Koch

Christopher Koch is the Editorial Director of the SAP Center for Business Insight. He is an experienced publishing professional, researcher, editor, and writer in business, technology, and B2B marketing. Share your thoughts with Chris on Twitter @Ckochster.

Tags:

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Drew Schiller

About Drew Schiller

Drew Schiller co-founded and serves as the Chief Executive Officer of Validic, the leading digital health platform for connecting patient-generated data from apps, wearables, and in-home medical devices to the healthcare system. At Validic, Drew leads the corporate strategy, drives key day-to-day initiatives, and works closely with senior executives at partner organizations to stay ahead of the innovation curve.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Carolyn Beal

About Carolyn Beal

Carolyn Beal is senior director of Solution Marketing for Social Software at SAP. Her specialties include product marketing, marketing communications, CRM, and demand generation.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Jayne Landry

About Jayne Landry

Jayne Landry is the global vice president and general manager for Business Intelligence at SAP. Ms. Landry joined Crystal Decisions in 2002 and came into SAP through the Business Objects acquisition in 2007. A seasoned executive with 20+ years of experience in the technology sector, Jayne has held leadership roles in high-tech companies in the CRM, mobility, and cloud applications space. Ms. Landry holds a Bachelor of Commerce degree from the University of Auckland, and has continued executive development with Queen’s University, Ontario, and through work with the Sauder School of Business at the University of British Columbia.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim and Michael Rander

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Rick Knowles

About Rick Knowles

Rick Knowles is senior vice president (SVP) and general manager (GM) of the partnership between SAP SE and Apple, Inc. In this role, he oversees the strategic roadmap in building state-of-the-art applications for some of the most complex business systems in the world. Rick has been with SAP for close to 20 years, where he has held executive positions such as SVP and chief of staff, GM of One Customer Experience, and SVP and chief operating officer for SAP Americas, the company’s largest geographic market. You can follow him on Twitter @RickKnowlesSAP.

About Michael Rander

Michael Rander is the Global Research Director for Future Of Work at SAP. He is an experienced project manager, strategic and competitive market researcher, operations manager as well as an avid photographer, athlete, traveler and entrepreneur. Share your thoughts with Michael on Twitter @michaelrander.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Florian Wagner

About Florian Wagner

Florian Wagner is marketing director for IT audience messaging at SAP. Together with his team, he is responsible to address the IT audience and to drive relevant thought leadership topics. He writes about technology trends on digital transformation, cloud and platform strategies with a focus on customer experiences.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Michael Brenner

About Michael Brenner

Michael Brenner is a globally-recognized keynote speaker, author of  The Content Formula and the CEO of Marketing Insider GroupHe has worked in leadership positions in sales and marketing for global brands like SAP and Nielsen, as well as for thriving startups. Today, Michael shares his passion on leadership and marketing strategies that deliver customer value and business impact. He is recognized by the Huffington Post as a Top Business Keynote Speaker and   a top  CMO influencer by Forbes.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Verena Wiszinski

About Verena Wiszinski

Verena Wiszinski is a Senior Integrated Marketing Specialist within the Global IT Audience Marketing team at SAP. She enjoys staying connected with customers and thought leaders and talking first hand with them about their experiences, thoughts, and needs within business transformation.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness