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Cybersecurity: Is it Time To Change Our Mindset?

Mark Testoni

For years, the standard approach to cybersecurity has been to build bigger and bigger walls to “keep the bad guys out.” But as the threat of cybercrime has evolved over time, this approach alone is not enough. Here, we look at the growing cybersecurity challenge and key imperatives facing CIOs.

As the Internet has pervaded all aspects of business and personal life, so has the list of cyber threats that could impact your enterprise. It’s not just rival companies looking to steal ideas. Currently an attack on your network could come from a wide range of sources. Your company could find itself under siege from organized crime, terrorist groups, and even foreign governments.

State and commercial interests are merging, with the networks of private companies now seen as key targets when countries are in conflict. For this reason, many corporations are adopting the same cybersecurity strategies as our national security organizations.

The enemy within

A data breach event could potentially cost millions of dollars, leaving your corporate reputation in ruins. With so much at stake, how do you protect your organization and its intellectual property from all attacks?

This is the challenge. Technological developments have moved so fast in recent years that few networks could ever claim to be 100% impenetrable. And as fast as IT security experts establish barriers to their systems, technologically advanced hackers find ways around them.

Rapid detection, agile response

So, how can commercial companies respond to the evolving cyber threat?

What we need is an entirely new mindset when it comes to cybersecurity. We should assume that hackers can and will access our networks. To complement the evolution of perimeter defenses, we need to shift our focus to detecting and acting on attacks as quickly as possible.

If this approach is to be successful, speed is essential. It is not enough to look in the rear-view mirror to understand what happened yesterday. We need a “front windshield view” to analyze, understand, and respond to threats as they occur.

Revolutionary new approach

With traditional computing approaches, companies simply cannot react fast enough to respond effectively to cyber attacks as they take place. These companies are often only able to determine that a cyber attack has already occurred and attempt to limit the damage to their operations and customers. The prevalence of this can be seen in the number of companies issuing reports about data breaches and offering credit monitoring to their compromised customers. Companies need a way to detect attacks as they are happening, and before the attacker has an opportunity to cause damage.

Sophisticated in-memory computing solutions are enabling this revolution in the way we approach cybersecurity. In an environment where there will never be one, single cyber-product answer, we need to bring the best of all worlds together in an integrated, high-performance manner. For example, with our strategic partners SS8, ThreatConnect, and Babel Street, we are leveraging SAP HANA as a high-performance hub to integrate real-time cyber-situational awareness and threat context. This enables the enterprise to understand the threat, find it, and act on it in real time.

This high-performance computing platform can achieve speeds many thousands of times faster than traditional data architectures. This enables the processing of huge data sets in seconds rather than days and allows analysis at true cyber speed. Companies using this capability can detect and stop cyber attacks while they are underway and before their data can be compromised.

Setting priorities

From the outset, we need to understand that breaches are possible and not all targets can be protected equally. Instead we must identify the high-value targets that are most likely to be attacked and prioritize the areas where a security breach would be most damaging.

For example, finance operations and critical infrastructure are key for most organizations. In addition, personal information is a high-value commodity that cyber criminals are increasingly targeting.

Managing security risk

The Internet has given us the greatest opportunity for economic expansion since the Industrial Revolution. And when you consider the fact that e-commerce accounts for trillions of dollars each year, losses due to security breaches seem minimal.

However, cyber crime is evolving and the threat is growing.

There is no absolute solution or quick fix. The imperative for CIOs is to deploy their available resources effectively to close the aperture of risk as much as possible, and re-evaluate their strategy on an ongoing basis. They need solutions with speed to detect and stop attacks while they are underway. And they must use the latest in-memory technology innovations to stay one step ahead of the cyber criminals.

Threats to your organization can come in many forms, including Supply Chain Fraud: Theft That’s Hidden in Plain Sight.

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Mark Testoni

About Mark Testoni

Mark Testoni is president and chief executive of SAP NS2. He is one of the nation’s leading experts in the application of information technology to solve problems in government and industry, especially in the U.S. national security space. With more than 15 years of IT industry experience, 20 years in the U.S. Air Force, and 30 years of public sector management experience, Testoni is a sought-after business strategist and thought leader, with a proven record of rebuilding under-performing organizations and converting visionary ideas into reality. record of rebuilding under-performing organizations and converting visionary ideas into reality.

Tags:

CIO , cybersecurity

Cybersecurity: It’s More Than Just Technology

Stefan Guertzgen

Last week I visited the ARC Forum in Orlando, and cybersecurity was one of the most prominent topics throughout the whole event. Here are some key lessons I learned:

There are different categories of cyberattacks. On one end are high-frequency attacks perpetuated by attackers with low-level skills. Those typically have a low impact on your company and its operations.

On the other end are less frequent but high-impact attacks that affect critical operations or that target high-value data. Such attacks require a high skill set on the attacker’s side.

How do you protect yourself and your company from both types of attacks?

The first category includes such things as spam, common viruses, or Trojans, most of which you can to fight with technology like spam filters or anti-virus software. However, the boundaries are blurring. The more the attacks move toward the high-impact category, the more you need resources with special skill sets that at least match those of the cyberattackers.

In other words, technology, skilled resources, and executive-level commitment and support must go hand-in-hand to build a resilient cybersecurity and threat protection system.

Sid Snitkin, from ARC, presented a five-stage maturity model comprising the following levels:

  • Secure
  • Defend
  • Contain
  • Manage
  • Anticipate

The higher you climb on this “maturity ladder,” the more skilled resources come into play, and the more you have to break up silos within and beyond your company boundaries. Dan Rosinski, from Dow Chemical, stated that “it takes more than a village” to establish a strong cybersecurity. Fostering collaboration between IT, engineering, operations, legal, safety, purchasing, and business is a critical success factor.

Also, cybersecurity is not a one-off exercise. As hacker’s skill sets grow exponentially, you need to dynamically revisit your strategy and tools. Increasingly, new hardware and software are developed with embedded security and self-protection, especially tools that are used at the perimeter of a company’s environment. Hence, cybersecurity should be considered as a journey that just has started.

Share your experiences and thoughts on cybersecurity with us!

For more insight on cybersecurity technology, see Machine Learning: The New High-Tech Focus For Cybersecurity.

Comments

Stefan Guertzgen

About Stefan Guertzgen

Dr. Stefan Guertzgen is the Global Director of Industry Solution Marketing for Chemicals at SAP. He is responsible for driving Industry Thought Leadership, Positioning & Messaging and strategic Portfolio Decisions for Chemicals.

Jumpstart Your 2017 Digital Transformation With A Model Company-Driven Approach

Arend Weil

Digital transformation can be an exciting experience with the right mix of technology, commitment, and leadership. Someone on the executive team sets a company-wide initiative to improve a particular area of the business by using the latest technology. The entire leadership team is committed once they understand the possible outcomes. The workforce, in general, is inspired about the opportunity to simplify their daily work experiences, deliver customer experiences that make a difference, and add value to the bottom line.

Year after year, I see an exponentially growing number of companies putting digital transformation at the center of their corporate strategies. Some are committed to sweeping digital transformation initiatives, while others may take a more conservative “one organization at a time” approach. But no matter their comfort level, there is one common thread that connects these businesses: The fear of wasted time, effort, money, and potential.

And this fear is not made up out of thin air. Each year, enterprises spend US$400 billion on digital projects that do not deliver what they promise, according to a Genpact study. The culprit? Misjudged business transformation strategies.

Now suppose you had a road map that clearly showed the path to digital transformation and a reference solution that demonstrates the feasibility of the ultimate goal – all tailored for your industry or line of business. Could it change your digital transformation narrative for 2017?

Introducing model companies

A model company is a pre-packaged, ready-to-use, end-to-end reference solution, tailored to an industry or line of business. It comprises state-of-the-art applications and proven best practices and encapsulates the experience from successful, real-life digital transformation projects. Embedded in an overall transformation road map and delivered as part of a service, a model company-driven approach enables you to reduce cost, decrease risk, and accelerate adoption.

Here are four ingredients which are, based on my experience, essential to delivering on that promise:

  • A preconfigured solution that includes all required applications, customized settings, and sample data to get started immediately. These components are all prepackaged in a way that lets you decide whether you want to run your model company in the cloud or on premises. No matter which path you choose, you gain quick and easy access to these solutions without consuming limited resources.
  • Relevant business content covering end-to-end processes that encompass the experience and knowledge relevant to your industry, line of business, and business users. Every element is documented in an easy-to-access format to help you understand, adapt, and adopt best practices.
  • Proven accelerators that support configuration guides, test cases, how-to advice on scenarios, process variants, implementable steps, demo scripts, or questionnaires. With these tools, you can make the best use of the solution in an efficient and guided way.
  • Quick-start services that help you become familiar with the model company and unlock the full potential of all related tools, accelerators, and processes. These services are delivered in a manner that allows you to enjoy the hands-on experience very quickly.

The beauty of the model company approach is that you can jumpstart your transformation not just in theory, but hands-on. You can access lessons learned in real systems and move in an agile way – instead of spending your resources and time on commodities. Driven by a model company, your digital strategy can become a detailed map for true innovation.

Get on the path to digital transformation that delivers outcomes

Planning and resolving post-transformation challenges is the toughest battle in the digital transformation journey. Business leaders must choose the right roles and functions to hire or outsource. New operational processes must be created and established. And even the workplace culture should foster a safe environment for information sharing and unprecedented transparency.

All too often, these decisions are nothing more than guesswork. A model company-driven approach can help chart the finer details of your digital strategy with certainty. By injecting a level of standardization into your digital strategy, you can build a future of disruptive value for your business and customers with low-cost implementations of the latest technology, faster time to value, and constant innovation.

The choice is yours: disrupt or be disrupted. Learn more about The Disruptive Effects of Digital Business Models.

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Arend Weil

About Arend Weil

Arend Weil manages the SAP global service portfolio for R&D, engineering, sustainability, and asset management. He is focused on creating service offerings and solutions that increase delivery speed through reuse and repeatability. Latest initiatives include for example cloud based model companies, which combine SAP software innovations with real best practices. Over the course of 20 years, his passion for IT has taken him from the days of C-64 to the Internet of Things.

3 Ways Robots Will Co-Evolve with Humans

Christopher Koch

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Christopher Koch

About Christopher Koch

Christopher Koch is the Editorial Director of the SAP Center for Business Insight. He is an experienced publishing professional, researcher, editor, and writer in business, technology, and B2B marketing. Share your thoughts with Chris on Twitter @Ckochster.

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Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Andre Smith

About Andre Smith

An Internet, Marketing and E-Commerce specialist with several years of experience in the industry. He has watched as the world of online business has grown and adapted to new technologies, and he has made it his mission to help keep businesses informed and up to date.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Neil Patrick

About Neil Patrick

Neil Patrick is director of the GRC Center of Excellence in EMEA for SAP.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Ioana Sima

About Ioana Sima

Ioana Sima is an architecture student at Ion Mincu University of Architecture, CMO of DigitalWebProperties, coffee lover, and avid gamer. Despite my academic background, I decided to pursue a career in digital marketing. Why? Because it's thrilling, fascinating, and unpredictable. My goal is to contribute to the creation of something truly meaningful & to grow professionally. Follow me on Twitter if you enjoy gaming, dank memes, and digital marketing.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Bruce McCuaig

About Bruce McCuaig

Bruce McCuaig is director - Product Marketing at SAP GRC solutions. He is responsible for development and execution of the product marketing strategy for SAP Risk Management, SAP Audit Management and SAP solutions for three lines of defense. Bruce has extensive experience in industry as a finance professional, as a chief risk officer, and as a chief audit executive. He has written and spoken extensively on GRC topics and has worked with clients around the world implementing GRC solutions and technology.

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Tags:

awareness

Donuts, Content Management and Information Governance

Ina Felsheim

I was on vacation for two weeks, which was awesome, and my girls mainly wanted to do two things:

I had my own list of projects, too. The big one was installing glass tile on the kitchen backsplash. (Grout everywhere. That’s all I’m saying.)

After two weeks of glorious holiday, I sat down to take stock. The old technical writer in me came creeping out, and I began to count how many sets of instructions we followed over the course of the two weeks—more than 15, definitely. And the amazing thing? They were all right. Every. Last. One. From proper application of fabric paint to proper frying temperature for homemade donuts, to putting together a shoe rack that came in 20 pieces.

I’m pretty sure this wouldn’t have happened five years ago. The difference comes from an increased awareness in the importance of great user assistance. Without successful “use,” who’s going to evangelize your product?

Information Governance: Part of a Larger Food Pyramid

In EIM, we have a well-seasoned group of information developers. They apply information governance principles every day:

  • Create a single source of master information (in this case, product step-by-step instructions)
  • Manage versioning of master information (as product updates happen)
  • Survey end-users of the information to gauge quality, freshness, and applicability of master information
  • Establish master information Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, or Informed (RACI) models for owners, reviewers, and informed stakeholders.

Sometimes, we group this knowledge management work into other categories, like content management. However, information governance needs to also be inclusive of these activities; otherwise, how can we be successful? No one can live on donuts alone!

Does your information governance program include content management? Do you have comments about the quality of EIM user assistance (online help, PDFs, printed documentation, etc.)?

Comments

Richard Howells

About Richard Howells

Richard Howells is a Vice President at SAP responsible for the positioning, messaging, AR , PR and go-to market activities for the SAP Supply Chain solutions.

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awareness